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Jaws 2
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Jaws 2 (1978) More at IMDbPro »

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Jaws 2 -- Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water! The beach-goers of Amity are threatened again by a giant, man-eating shark in this thrilling sequel to Spielberg's masterpiece!

Overview

User Rating:
5.7/10   44,609 votes »
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Down 18% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Peter Benchley (characters created by)
Carl Gottlieb (written by) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Jaws 2 on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
16 June 1978 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water... See more »
Plot:
Police chief Brody must protect the citizens of Amity after a second monstrous shark begins terrorizing the waters. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
NewsDesk:
(79 articles)
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 (From Den of Geek. 26 February 2015, 8:15 AM, PST)

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 (From Entertainment Tonight. 26 October 2014, 8:40 PM, PDT)

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 (From MoreHorror. 19 August 2014, 7:33 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
Pacing could have been more tight, but it's often suspenseful and exciting. See more (254 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Roy Scheider ... Police Chief Martin Brody

Lorraine Gary ... Ellen Brody

Murray Hamilton ... Mayor Larry Vaughn

Joseph Mascolo ... Len Peterson

Jeffrey Kramer ... Deputy Jeff Hendricks

Collin Wilcox Paxton ... Dr. Lureen Elkins (as Collin Wilcox)
Ann Dusenberry ... Tina Wilcox

Mark Gruner ... Michael 'Mike' Brody
Barry Coe ... Tom Andrews
Susan French ... Grace Witherspoon - Old Lady

Gary Springer ... Andy Nicholas

Donna Wilkes ... Jackie Peters
Gary Dubin ... Eddie Marchand
John Dukakis ... Paul 'Polo' Loman

G. Thomas Dunlop ... Timmy Weldon

David Elliott ... Larry Vaughn Jr.
Marc Gilpin ... Sean Brody

Keith Gordon ... Doug Fetterman

Cindy Grover ... Lucy (as Cynthia Grover)
Ben Marley ... Patrick
Martha Swatek ... Marge

Billy Van Zandt ... Bob
Gigi Vorgan ... Brooke Peters
Jerry M. Baxter ... Helicopter Pilot
Jean Coulter ... Diane - Ski Boat Driver
Daphne Dibble ... Swimmer #1
Christine Freeman ... Terri - Water Skier
April Gilpin ... Renee
William Griffith ... Lifeguard
Gregory Harris ... Diver #2 (as Greg Harris)
Coll Red McLean ... Red - 'Old Man of the Sea'
Susan O. McMillan ... Girl Sailor
David Owsley ... Boy Sailor
Allan L. Paddack ... Crosby
Oneida Rollins ... Ambulance Driver
Frank James Sparks ... Diver #1 (as Frank Sparks)
Thomas A. Stewart ... Sparky - Assistant Dive Master
David Tintle ... Swimmer #2
Jim Wilson ... Swimmer with Child
Kathy Wilson ... Mrs. Bryant
Herb Muller ... Phil Fogarty
Fritzi Jane Courtney ... Mrs. Taft - Select Woman (as Jane Courtney)
Alfred Wilde ... Harry Wiseman - Select Man #1 (as Al Wilde)
Cyprian R. Dube ... Mr. Posner - Select Man #2 (as Cyprien 'Phil' Dube)
Mary A. Gaffney ... Mrs. Silvera
Bill Green ... Irate 'Dancing' Man (as William 'Bill' Green)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

George Buck ... Irate 'Letterbox' Man (uncredited)
Michael Smith ... Extra (uncredited)

Directed by
Jeannot Szwarc 
 
Writing credits
Peter Benchley (characters created by)

Carl Gottlieb (written by) and
Howard Sackler (written by)

Produced by
Joe Alves .... associate producer
David Brown .... producer
Richard D. Zanuck .... producer
 
Original Music by
John Williams 
 
Cinematography by
Michael C. Butler (director of photography) (as Michael Butler)
 
Film Editing by
Steve Potter 
Arthur Schmidt 
Neil Travis 
 
Production Design by
Joe Alves 
 
Art Direction by
W. Stewart Campbell  (as Stewart Campbell)
Gene Johnson 
 
Set Decoration by
Phil Abramson  (as Philip Abramson)
 
Costume Design by
Bill Jobe 
 
Makeup Department
Robert Jiras .... makeup artist (as Bob Jiras)
Philip Leto .... hair stylist (as Phil Leto)
Rick Sharp .... makeup artist
Ron Snyder .... makeup artist
Dorothy Parkinson .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Bill Badalato .... unit production manager
Tom Joyner .... production manager
Tony LaMarca .... unit production manager: second unit (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Joe Alves .... second unit director
Katy Emde .... second assistant director (as Kathy Marie Emde)
Scott Maitland .... first assistant director
Beau Marks .... second assistant director
Wilbur Mosier .... assistant director: second unit
Don Zepfel .... first assistant director
 
Art Department
Gary Seybert .... property master
Jim Ellis .... second props (uncredited)
Jerry Moss .... second props (uncredited)
Bill Parks .... construction coordinator (uncredited)
Richard A. Villalobos .... leadman (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
James R. Alexander .... sound (as Jim Alexander)
Robert L. Hoyt .... sound recordist
James Troutman .... sound effects editor (as Jim Troutman)
Alsie L. Florence .... sound recordist (uncredited)
Robert Jackson .... boom operator (uncredited)
George E. Marshall Jr. .... sound utility (uncredited)
John McDonald .... boom operator (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Roy Arbogast .... special mechanical effects
Robert A. Mattey .... special mechanical effects
Johnny Borgese .... special effects (uncredited)
Kevin Pike .... special effects foreman (uncredited)
Eddie Surkin .... special effects crew (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Chris Mueller .... sculptor: model (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Ted Grossman .... stunt coordinator
Gregory J. Barnett .... stunts (uncredited)
Jean Coulter .... stunts (uncredited)
Hubie Kerns Jr. .... stunts (uncredited)
Steven Knowles .... stunt performer (uncredited)
Greg Le Duc .... water stunt double (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
John L. Black .... key grip (as John Black)
David L. Butler .... camera operator: second unit (as David Butler)
Michael Dugan .... underwater camera operator
John Fleckenstein .... camera operator
Michael McGowan .... camera operator: second unit
Ron Taylor .... live shark photography
Valerie Taylor .... live shark photography
Donald M. Wolak .... gaffer (as Don Wolak)
Eugene Barragy .... key grip (uncredited)
Gabe Bolderoff .... grip (uncredited)
Bill Bryant .... best boy (uncredited)
Pat Campea Jr. .... second key grip (uncredited)
Jim Coe .... still photographer (uncredited)
Randy Dahlquist .... operator (uncredited)
Louis Goldman .... still photographer (uncredited)
John Gray .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
Robert L. Guthrie .... assistant camera (uncredited)
David Jarrell .... operator (uncredited)
Harvey Kamins .... operator (uncredited)
Joe Kelly .... best boy grip (uncredited)
J. Michael McClary .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
John McGowan .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
Sol Negrin .... cinematographer: re-shoots (uncredited)
Don Piel .... camera operator (uncredited)
Rich Redlands .... second key grip (uncredited)
Jack Vogel .... dolly grip (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
Liz Keigley .... location casting
Shari Rhodes .... location casting
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Laurann Cordero .... wardrobe: ladies
Gilbert Loe .... wardrobe: men (as Gil Loe)
Paul Saragusa .... wardrobe: men (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Freeman A. Davies .... assistant film editor (as Freeman Davies Jr.)
Michael T. Elias .... assistant film editor
Robert Hernandez .... assistant film editor
Sherrie Sanet .... assistant film editor (as Sherrie Sanet Jacobson)
 
Music Department
Stephen A. Hope .... music editor
John Neal .... music scoring mixer
 
Transportation Department
Dan Anglin .... driver co-captain (uncredited)
Mel Bingham .... driver captain (uncredited)
Philip Martin .... boat driver (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Al Ebner .... unit publicist
Bob Forrest .... script supervisor
Philip Kingry .... marine coordinator
Donald MacDonald .... production assistant
Esther Vivante .... script supervisor: second unit
Fred Zendar .... technical advisor (as Manfred Zendar)
Charles Ajar .... projectionist (uncredited)
Joe Catalfo .... first aid (uncredited)
Raechel Donahue .... voice talent (uncredited)
Harry Jukes .... 40 man (uncredited)
Irving Kramer .... location auditor (uncredited)
Max Manlove .... production secretary (uncredited)
Sherrill Patten .... timekeeper (uncredited)
Gene Starzenski .... set paramedic (uncredited)
Ron Veto .... underwater diver (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
116 min | Brazil:131 min (television version)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:M | Canada:PG (Manitoba) | Canada:A (Nova Scotia) (original rating) | Canada:AA (Ontario) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Canada:14 (Nova Scotia) (2001) | Chile:TE | Finland:K-16 | Iceland:16 | Italy:T | Netherlands:12 (original rating) | Norway:16 | Norway:15 (DVD) | Peru:14 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:PG | South Korea:15 (DVD rating) | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (tv rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (1987) (2000) (2001) | USA:PG (certificate #25237) | West Germany:16

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In one of the boat scenes a young man is seen reading a book: "Jaws" by Peter Benchley.See more »
Goofs:
Boom mic visible: When Brody and Ellen are sitting at the kitchen table on the morning after Brody was fired, when Ellen stands up to talk to their house keeper, the shadow of a crewman holding a boom mic is visible on the wall on the right of screen, while the shadow of the boom mic can be seen above the doorway.See more »
Quotes:
Helicopter Pilot:[over radio] That you, Brody?
Martin Brody:Yeah, Ed, listen, did you have a fix on those kids yet?
Helicopter Pilot:Negative - I'm still down.
Martin Brody:Well, you'd better get the hell up, because I'm out here all alone!
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Starstruck (1982)See more »
Soundtrack:
DowntownSee more »

FAQ

Is 'Jaws 2' based on a book?
Is it true that there are major differences between the movie and the novel?
How soon after 'Jaws' ends does 'Jaws 2' begin?
See more »
55 out of 65 people found the following review useful.
Pacing could have been more tight, but it's often suspenseful and exciting., 18 May 2001
Author: jiangliqings

*** out of ****

As a sequel to an immensely popular classic, Jaws 2 had a lot to live up to, and while it doesn't reach the level of sheer terror of the original, it's still effective in creating thrills, some scares, and excitement. The biggest flaw is the pace, since the scenes on land drag on over and over. These moments hurt an otherwise entertaining and often fun motion picture.

The plot is mostly a re-hash of Jaws. It even takes place in the same town, Amity. It's been years since the first shark was killed and Chief Martin Brody (Roy Scheider) begins to have his suspicions of another great white in the vicinity when two divers are reported missing, a boating accident that results in the mysterious disappearance of a mother and daughter, and a killer whale washed ashore with large bites all over it. Brody voices his beliefs to the mayor (Murray Hamilton), who, along with real estate developer Glenn Petersen (Joseph Mascolo), disregard this because of the current production of a hotel on the beach.

Brody's constant paranoia of the situation eventually gets him fired. Meanwhile, his two sons, Mike and Sean, sneak off to sail with a group of other teens. When another shark attack occurs and is confirmed, Brody sets off to find his sons before it's too late.

I've heard a lot of interesting things involving the making of this sequel. Apparently, Spielberg and Dreyfuss were interested in returning, but couldn't due to their filming of Close Encounters. The original story was supposed to be more character-oriented, without as much focus on the teens in peril, but when Spielberg had to back out the studio executives got nervous and went with Szwarc to make a more formulaic and "effective" sequel. Roy Scheider would be the only big star from the original who would return.

I'm a huge admirer of Steven Spielberg's film, and it would be hard for any other director to equal, much less surpass, his filmmaking techniques. Director Jeannot Szwarc does an overall solid job here. He knows what made the first film effective and holds off long camera shots of the shark for a while (in my opinion, maybe a little too long). The beginning of the film does a nice job of creating interest and a good set-up is appreciated. However, this set-up goes on a little too long. A half-hour would have been just fine, but Szwarc takes nearly 75 minutes for the film to focus on the shark hunting down the sailing teens.

You may wonder why I voice my complaint for this when in the original the shark didn't make it's first full appearance until near the end. Well, in that film's case there were three great characters (only one of whom returned) and some classic suspense sequences to crank up the tension (Dreyfuss and Scheider's exploration of the abandoned boat, anyone?). While Szwarc should be noted for trying to build up momentum, he slows down everything a little too much and thrill seekers looking for non-stop action may find it disappointing, and it might be more up their alley to look for Deep Blue Sea (which is considerably faster moving, though is an overall weaker film).

It is initially interesting to see how this sequel builds up its story with such scenes as the examination of a dead killer whale and a diver who runs into the shark, and it is quite entertaining to revisit Amity again, but Brody's constant back and forth debates with the town committee get tiresome after awhile. We know he's right and they're wrong and the film makers should have realized that these arguments get old quickly. To be fair, Scheider's performance does put in a bit more tension into these scenes, but it takes something more clever than that to keep things moving at a brisk pace.

The film does finally get moving in the last 35 or so minutes, and it's in those moments that make the film the overall effective sequel it is. The constant shark attacks deliver the goods. Szwarc knows how to milk tension into these scenes and doesn't disappoint. The finale is particularly an exercise in creating seat-gripping suspense. It's almost a match for the conclusion to Jaws. The final showdown between Brody and the shark is just as memorable and edge-of-the-seat as his final confrontation with the other great white in the original. John Williams' score is as effective as ever and serves to heighten the tension factor by a notch.

Admittedly, there are some implausibilities abound. Great whites aren't nearly that aggressive and for one that eats as much as it does, it's really quite hungry. The shark even pulls down a helicopter in one scene to presumably eat the pilot (In the TV version, there's an added scene of the shark trying to chomp the pilot). Brody's plan to kill the shark relies on quite a bit of luck, though I won't complain as much about this since it is the film's highlight sequence and is an example of masterful direction.

Most people tend to ridicule the visual effects in the Jaws series. In my opinion, they're more effective and significantly better than CGI renditions of animals seen in the more recent thrillers like Deep Blue Sea, Anaconda, and Lake Placid. Szwarc's high angle shots of the great white are the best, evoking a sense of terror by just looking at the top of this ferocious animal. With an animatronic shark, it's not nearly as mobile as what can be rendered by computer technology, but it beats having the animal look like a refugee from a video game. There are also other things that set this film above those aforementioned movies, such as restraint, seriousness, and no annoying over-reliance on mostly unfunny self-deprecating humor.

To mention how effective the script is would probably be a moot point. Anybody watching this movie wants to see it for the shark attacks. Howard Sackler and Carl Gottlieb do a reasonable job of repeating what was successful in the original story without completely ripping it off. This time around, there's no compelling monologue like Robert Shaw's retelling of the fate of the men on the U.S.S. Indianapolis, but the screenwriters can be credited for not writing any laughably ludicrous dialogue. When the stranded teens argue, everything they say is reasonable within the context of the situation they're in.

The film's performances are overall decent. Roy Scheider has always been one of my favorite actors; he's easily the best here and is very good as the man determined to save his sons. Martin Brody is still by all means a great character, and Scheider's portrayal of him as an everyman caught up in a terrifying situation makes it extremely easy to sympathize with him. Lorraine Gray is decent as his wife and though she gets more screen time than before she's still not given a chance to fully flesh out her character. And, boy, we all saw her character develop in Jaws the Revenge, but we all know how that turned out. Murray Hamilton and Joseph Mascolo are appropriately sneaky and sly as the town mayor and real estate developer. They're really not so much people as they are those who have to be wrong all the time. It's a cliche, and it's not as effective as it was in Jaws. I can't really say which actor who portrays the teens does the best job. They're all fairly equal and they are pretty good at not annoying us, which makes it easier to feel for them when the shark attacks begin.

It's basically like this: when the film takes place on land, it's sometimes slow-moving and not always interesting. When it's on water, it's often exciting and tense, with suspense that sometimes equals the original. It's definitely not as great a thriller as Jaws, but it is a worthy sequel and certainly is better than the likes of Deep Blue Sea, Anaconda, and Lake Placid.

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