7.4/10
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173 user 197 critic

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

In San Francisco, a group of people discover the human race is being replaced one by one, with clones devoid of emotion.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)
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at Amazon

4 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Stan Ritchie ...
David Fisher ...
Tom Dahlgren ...
Garry Goodrow ...
Jerry Walter ...
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Storyline

The first remake of the paranoid infiltration classic moves the setting for the invasion from a small town to the city of San Fransisco and starts as Matthew Bennell notices that several of his friends are complaining that their close relatives are in some way different. When questioned later they themselves seem changed as they deny everything or make lame excuses. As the invaders increase in number they become more open and Bennell, who has by now witnessed an attempted "replacement" realises that he and his friends must escape or suffer the same fate. But who can he trust to help him and who has already been snatched? Written by Mark Thompson <mrt@oasis.icl.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Watch out! They get you while you're sleeping! See more »

Genres:

Horror | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 December 1978 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Die Körperfresser kommen  »

Box Office

Budget:

$3,500,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Dolby Stereo)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Among the sounds Ben Burtt used for the pod growing scene, the heartbeat came from an ultrasound recorded on his pregnant wife. The pod screams were recorded pig squeals. Additionally, the natural diegetic sounds (crickets, birds chirping) fade as the film progresses, until only mechanical sounds (sirens, the garbage trucks) are heard. See more »

Goofs

When the running man has his fatal "accident," two cars cross the intersection twice: a maroon Beetle with gray front wheel guards and a green car. We don't see the impact, hidden by a green commercial van, but from the impact timing, the second Beetle had to be the vehicle to strike him. The policeman arrives with the second green car. As they turn right on red, the vehicles parked across the street from the accident suddenly change. The green car has diagonally parked at the scene ahead of the victim, its red parka-wearing driver looking on, but the Beetle is nowhere to be seen. See more »

Quotes

Jack Bellicec: The rest of the world is trying to change people for fit the world. I'm trying to change the world to fit people.
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Connections

Referenced in Farscape: Beware of Dog (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

Amazing Grace
[Traditional]
As performed by the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards
Courtesy of RCA Limited
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Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Alive and richly done, with some great performances!
9 October 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Invasion of the Body Snatcher (1978)

The original 1950s version of this movie is such a favorite of mine, I hesitated to watch this one. But fear not. This is great, too. It's got the same theme, but very richly and creatively rendered, some superb photography, great night stuff, and most importantly, great acting by the key 3 or 4 people.

Director Philip Kaufman works sporadically as director and writer (he hit it big with "Raiders of the Lost Ark") and he clearly has a unique and somewhat fearless vision that remains rooted in Hollywood sensibilities. That is, this is no independent film, yet it's creative.

And it's scary. Between the development of fear over the actual biological invasion, and the old fashioned chase and hide sequences, this is a tense movie. But yet it's convincing, given the realistic, nuanced acting by the main couple, Donald Sutherland (as a Health Department official) and Brooke Adams (as a lab analyst in the same department). Of course, what happens isn't believable at all, somehow, but it's so close to feasible, and in fact so close to what we live with already (some people without feelings, out for themselves, part of a conspiracy, etc.), it isn't hard to pull it off.

Cinematographer Michael Chapman is about as good as it gets in the Hollywood vein, polished and with amazing, varied lighting (he also did "Raging Bull," "The Fugitive," and "Taxi Driver," for starters). So this movie works on every level. The one thing it isn't, of course, is original, but as a remake, we have to take it for how it handles it, 1970s style. Impressive.


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