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Interiors (1978) More at IMDbPro »


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9 items from 2011


"Woody Allen: A Documentary" + Diane Keaton's "Then Again"

20 November 2011 5:40 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

I'd rather have opened with the spider scene from Annie Hall, but there doesn't seem to be an embeddable version of decent quality. At any rate, it's probably a little unfair to both Woody Allen and Diane Keaton to lump PBS's Woody Allen: A Documentary (airing in two parts tonight and tomorrow) and Keaton's new memoir, Then Again, into the same roundup. After all, of the 46 films he's made and the 50-odd films she's appeared in, Keaton has only been in seven Woody Allen movies (eight, if you count Play It Again, Sam [1972], which he wrote but which Herbert Ross directed). Diane Keaton is, of course, a director in her own right, too (her oeuvre includes an episode of Twin Peaks!), as well as a photographer, artist and designer. And Woody Allen is, well, Woody Allen. Draw a Venn diagram of their careers, and there's just a whole lot »

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Then Again: A Memoir by Diane Keaton – review

19 November 2011 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Diane Keaton's autobiography is an endearing ramble that reveals more about her close relationship with her mother than it does about her films

You would not expect a memoir by Diane Keaton to be a conventional "as told to" or ghosted showbusiness autobiography, and indeed she recognises her own eccentricity in a 1969 letter to her mother written after failing an audition for a Broadway comedy. "Too tall and too 'kooky' – a nice way of saying strange," she reports, using a newly fashionable term to describe the ditzy likes of Goldie Hawn, Liza Minnelli and herself. Her rambling, endearing book is not short of glamorous names, nor does it scorn ambition and fame. But she shares the stage with her family and most particularly with her mother, Dorothy Hall, as co-star. On the final page she calls the book "our memoir – your words with my words". In 1968 when she got »

- Philip French

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Review: Rhys Ifans Brings Roland Emmerich's Mammoth Historical Thriller Anonymous Down to Earth

27 October 2011 7:30 AM, PDT | Movieline | See recent Movieline news »

Sometimes directors with certain strengths try to stretch different muscles and you desperately wish they wouldn't: Woody Allen getting all serious with Interiors comes to mind. But Roland Emmerich, taking a break from cavorting with woolly mammoths and blowing up the world, is onto something with Anonymous, an intricate -- if not terribly convincing -- historical thriller positing that a minor Elizabethan poet named Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, and not William Shakespeare, wrote all those plays and sonnets that the world loves so well. »

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Elizabeth Olsen and Sean Durkin Talk Cults, Paranoia and the Sinister Folk Music of 'Martha Marcy May Marlene'

17 October 2011 11:19 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

On a cold Friday morning in Seattle, overcast skies and still groggy from sleep, I sat down with writer/director Sean Durkin and Elizabeth Olsen, the breakout star of his first feature film, Martha Marcy May Marlene. The film tells the story of a few paranoid weeks after Martha (Olsen) has runaway from a cult in upstate New York as she finds refuge in her sister and brother-in-law's lakeside home in Connecticut. Despite asking, Martha either won't or can't tell her sister where she's been as she is quickly swallowed up by paranoia of what will happen now that she's left. The lines of what's real and what's imagined begin to blur and the audience is left to decide for themselves. What exactly could have drawn Durkin to such a project?

"I wanted to tell a story about a cult," he said, almost testing me to find out whether or »

- Brad Brevet

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Elisabeth Olsen and Sean Durkin Talk Cults, Paranoia and the Sinister Folk Music of 'Martha Marcy May Marlene'

17 October 2011 11:19 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

On a cold Friday morning in Seattle, overcast skies and still groggy from sleep, I sat down with writer/director Sean Durkin and Elizabeth Olsen, the breakout star of his first feature film, Martha Marcy May Marlene. The film tells the story of a few paranoid weeks after Martha (Olsen) has runaway from a cult in upstate New York as she finds refuge in her sister and brother-in-law's lakeside home in Connecticut. Despite asking, Martha either won't or can't tell her sister where she's been as she is quickly swallowed up by paranoia of what will happen now that she's left. The lines of what's real and what's imagined begin to blur and the audience is left to decide for themselves. What exactly could have drawn Durkin to such a project?

"I wanted to tell a story about a cult," he said, almost testing me to find out whether or »

- Brad Brevet

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Your Fav' Sixties & Seventies Ladies

25 August 2011 10:15 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

During Summer 2011  -- winding down at last! -- we've been asking Tfe readers to choose the most memorable Best Actress nominated film characters. Which film characters have you taken into your hearts and headspace most fully? Who is always popping into mind unbidden? Below are the latest voting results for August's polls covering the 1960s & 1970s (previous results: 1980s and 1991-2010). We used five year intervals for voting and asked readers to choose the 5 most memorable characters from each group of 25 Oscar nominees.

If you're looking for these polls to provide a "face" of an era it looks like Julie Andrews wins the early 60s -- she was thoroughly modern back then! -- and Faye Dunaway takes over from there for a long run at the top (1966-1980) [* indicates that it was an Oscar winning role.]

1961-1965

Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn) Breakfast at Tiffany's Mary Poppins* (Julie Andrews) Mary Poppins [tie] Maria Von Trapp (Julie Andrews) The Sound of Music »

- NATHANIEL R

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Review: You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger – Desperation For Happiness, Whatever That Is

18 March 2011 5:44 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Woody Allen; there aren’t many words in film-land more likely to create a critical divide between outright adoration, exasperated annoyance, or the half-interested puzzlement of ‘oh yeah, isn’t that the guy that used to be funny’.

From the early knockabout idiocy of Take the Money and Run, through the comedic genius years of ‘Sleeper’, ‘Play It Again, Sam’ and ‘Annie Hall’, and into the up and down experimentation with more broad humour (‘Small Time Crooks’) and pseudo-scandinavian angst (the interminable ‘Interiors’), Allen has at least never been less than interesting. Perhaps his desire to be seen as a dramatist and not just a stand-up comic turned film humourist has caused an often problematic output, but in the last few years it has added a welcome sardonic and darkly funny streak, particularly when his natural ability to find amusement in human behaviour is balanced with »

- Mark Clark

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Allen: 'I want to work with Keaton again'

14 March 2011 7:39 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Woody Allen has revealed that he hopes to one day reunite on screen with his Annie Hall star Diane Keaton. Allen admitted to The Guardian that he still has a desire for a "tour de force part" opposite Keaton, who the filmmaker dated in the '70s and cast in his movies Sleeper, Love And Death, Interiors, Manhattan, Radio Days and Manhattan Murder Mystery. "I can't be the love interest anymore," Allen said. "I can't play opposite Scarlett Johansson, it's not appropriate. So what can I do? I'd love to have a wonderful tour (more) »

- By Simon Reynolds

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David Thomson on Woody Allen

10 March 2011 4:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Suppose you had to sum up the achievements of Woody Allen (pictured). What would you say? He'll be 76 in December and, by then, there will be another film on top of the 2010 entry, You Will Meet a Tall, Dark Stranger, the current work, and one more in the line of Allen pictures we can barely separate in our minds.

No one has done more in his time. No director is more recognisable. No movie-maker has been as much of a cultural figure, so beloved and then such a figure of suspicion. But time has passed and the furore over Mia Farrow and Soon-Yi Previn has faded, it seems to me, like some of his own movies. So, what would we say?

It is claimed the exposure of his private life diminished his American audience, and Allen has observed in recent years that he has had to rely on Europe for his support. »

- David Thomson

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9 items from 2011


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