IMDb > Autumn Sonata (1978)
Höstsonaten
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Autumn Sonata (1978) More at IMDbPro »Höstsonaten (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
8.2/10   12,070 votes »
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Down 1% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Ingmar Bergman (writer)
Contact:
View company contact information for Autumn Sonata on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
October 1978 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A married daughter who longs for her mother's love gets visited by the latter, a successful concert pianist. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 14 wins & 2 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(42 articles)
Calvary
 (From Scorecard Review. 11 August 2014, 2:30 PM, PDT)

Afs Essential Cinema Preview: Liv Ullmann and Ingmar Bergman, Painfully Connected
 (From Slackerwood. 30 June 2014, 11:30 AM, PDT)

Film Review: ‘Trespassing Bergman’
 (From Variety - Film News. 19 February 2014, 5:12 PM, PST)

User Reviews:
Bergman directs Bergman See more (56 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Ingrid Bergman ... Charlotte Andergast

Liv Ullmann ... Eva
Lena Nyman ... Helena
Halvar Björk ... Viktor
Marianne Aminoff ... Charlotte's private secretary
Arne Bang-Hansen ... Uncle Otto

Gunnar Björnstrand ... Paul

Erland Josephson ... Josef
Georg Løkkeberg ... Leonardo
Mimi Pollak ... Piano instructor
Linn Ullmann ... Eva as a child
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Eva von Hanno ... Nurse (uncredited)
Knut Wigert ... Professor (uncredited)

Directed by
Ingmar Bergman 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Ingmar Bergman  writer

Cinematography by
Sven Nykvist 
 
Film Editing by
Sylvia Ingemarsson  (as Sylvia Ingmarsdotter)
 
Production Design by
Anna Asp 
 
Costume Design by
Inger Pehrsson 
 
Makeup Department
Cecilia Drott .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Katinka Faragó .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Peder Langenskiöld .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Ingeborg Kvamme .... props
Kaj Larsen .... props
 
Sound Department
Tommy Persson .... sound assistant
Owe Svensson .... sound mixer
Owe Svensson .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Arne Carlsson .... still photographer
Lars Karlsson .... assistant camera
Charlie Nykvist .... assistant camera
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Gisela Bergquist .... assistant costume designer
 
Music Department
Frans Brüggen .... musician: flute
Anner Bylsma .... musician: cello
Claude Genetay .... musician
Käbi Laretei .... musician: piano
 
Other crew
Knut Andersen .... others who helped
Bo Andersson .... others who helped
Jon Arvesen .... others who helped
Jo Banoun .... others who helped
Daniel Bergman .... others who helped
Ingrid Bergman .... administrator
Gunnar Bøvollen .... others who helped
Lars-Owe Carlberg .... administrator
Kerstin Eriksdotter .... continuity
Demetrios Glavas .... others who helped
Lena Hansson .... production assistant
Jarle Hole .... others who helped
Bjarne Kjos .... others who helped
Hans Lindgren .... location manager
Nils Melander .... laboratory technician
Per Mørk .... others who helped
Percy Nilsson .... others who helped
Tom Olsen .... others who helped
Rolf Persson .... others who helped
Ulf Pramfors .... others who helped
Gunnar Sakshaug .... others who helped
Åse Seim .... others who helped
Caroline Von Rosen .... attributes
Ragnar Waaranperä .... others who helped
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Höstsonaten" - France (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
99 min | UK:92 min
Language:
Color:
Color (Eastmancolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:M | Finland:K-12 | Netherlands:16 (original rating) | Norway:16 | Portugal:M/12 (Qualidade) | Singapore:PG | South Korea:12 (2012) | South Korea:15 (DVD rating) (2001) | Sweden:11 | UK:15 | UK:AA (original rating) | USA:PG | West Germany:12 (f)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
As Ingmar Bergman was essentially exiled from his native Sweden because of an ongoing battle with the tax authorities, the film was financed by his West German company, Personafilm GmbH, and Lew Grade's ITC Film, and shot in an old film studio outside Oslo in Norway.See more »
Goofs:
Boom mic visible: In the dialogue scene where Charlotte is lying on the floor and Eva is sitting on the sofa behind her, the shadow of the boom mic is visible on the curtains when the camera pans to Eva for a few seconds.See more »
Quotes:
Eva:You said my hair was too long and you had it cut short, it was hideous! Then you thought that I had crooked teeth, and you got me braces, I looked so grotesque! You would buy me books and I would read them and not understand them, and you would make me talk about them, and I would always be afraid that you would show up my stupidity.See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Liv & Ingmar (2012)See more »
Soundtrack:
Préludium Nr 2a, a-mollSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
12 out of 17 people found the following review useful.
Bergman directs Bergman, 24 June 2001
Author: Dennis Littrell from United States

Before she was an international star of incomparable charisma and beauty, and even before Ingmar Bergman became a legendary director of films bleak and intense, Ingrid Bergman played in the Swedish cinema. So it is entirely apropos that someday Bergman might direct Bergman.

Ingrid plays Charlotte, a concert pianist who has, upon the recent death of her longtime lover, Leonardo, returned to her native land to visit her daughter Eva (Liv Ullmann), whom she hasn't seen for seven years, and her husband Viktor (Halvar Bjork), who is a minister. Ullmann is frumpish in specs with her hair up and her dress loose and ill-fitting. She is Ingrid's nerdish daughter who has been throughout her life entirely overshadowed by her glamorous mother. Eva has an unpleasant surprise for mom. Her other daughter, Helena (Lena Nyman), who suffers from a crippling disease, perhaps muscular dystrophy, is on hand. Eva didn't tell her mother that Helena was now living with them. She says she didn't tell her because she knew that, if she had, Charlotte would not have come. And so we can guess that there are issues that will come out, issues between mother and daughter that have been festering for decades.

I got goose bumps seeing Ingrid Bergman as an elderly woman, and seeing the smooth, graceful style again, the elegant presence, a hint of the old gestures, the sly glances, the tentative smiles... It was really wonderful and at the same time disconcerting to examine her face (Sven Nykvist's intense close ups expose every inch of skin) and sigh and remember and understand the effect of the passing years. Ingrid is elegant but she has been robbed of her beauty so now we are able to see her character; unfortunately Ingmar's script allows little of the real Ingrid Bergman to appear. Hers is not a pleasant part to play. She is an entirely selfish and self-centered woman who has put her career before her family, but is unaware of what she has done. Eva seizes this opportunity to punish her mother by dredging up the neglect of her childhood to throw it in her mother's face (which perhaps explains why Charlotte hasn't been home in seven years). The sheer cold hatred that Eva expresses is enough to make the devil himself cringe. After a bit one begins to feel sorry for Charlotte, despite her failures as a mother, to have a daughter so unforgiving and so hateful.

Liv Ullmann is rather startling in this portrayal, with her penetrating eyes, her hard, Neandethalish forehead, the severe specs, and the uncompromising tone of her voice. Charlotte is ashamed and begs for forgiveness and tries to defend herself, but it is no use. Eva is too strong for her. This is one of the more intense scenes in cinema, and one not easily watched. Meanwhile in the upstairs bedroom and then in the hallway and down the staircase, Helena has heard them arguing and is pulling her crippled body over the floor, desperately trying to reach them. She cries out, "Mama! Mama!" but is not heard.

Viewers might want to pick sides between mother and daughter to say which is the more at fault. Indeed, it is hard to say who Bergman himself found more at fault. Perhaps there is no fault, only human weakness and stupidity. Such scenes are usually followed by a greater understanding, forgiveness and a willingness to start anew. However, although Charlotte wants that, it is not clear in Bergman's script that anything good will come of what has happened. Charlotte leaves, the minister returns to looking at his wife, (having overheard the argument, about which he has said nothing) and Eva writes a letter to her mother. It is not clear whether she wants to patch things up or to gain another opportunity to pick her mother to pieces. The viewer is left to decide.

Perhaps the best scene in the film is the one that follows dinner the night of Charlotte's arrival in which Eva plays the piano, a Chopin prelude. She has worked hard on it and hopes to please her mother. Alas, her play is not so good. After all, the mother is a genius, the daughter only the daughter of a genius. Charlotte sits down next to Eva and takes the keys to gently demonstrate how the piece should be played. We see and feel at once the inadequacy of the daughter in her mother's eyes. It is a great scene filmed with a tight focus on the faces of the two women. When Eva turns to stare at her mother, who is, of course, playing brilliantly with great finesse and touch, the expression on Eva's face, held for many long seconds, is unforgettable.

Not to second guess the master, but I would have liked to have seen the entire movie played in this, a more subtle key than that which followed. However when it comes to dysfunction and disease, Ingmar Bergman is unrestrained.

Ingrid Bergman was nominated for an academy award for best actress in this, her last feature film (she had already been diagnosed with cancer), but lost out to Jane Fonda in Coming Home (1978).

(Note: Over 500 of my movie reviews are now available in my book "Cut to the Chaise Lounge or I Can't Believe I Swallowed the Remote!" Get it at Amazon!)

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Message Boards

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Wow. Omnimedium
Did Viktor mail that letter? trudy-two2
99 or 89 min? taki15875
I not at all afraid to admit.... illbilly-1
La sinceridad en las relaciones humanas necrotranson
Eva and hate netta-sauri
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