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‘Wormwood’ Trailer: Errol Morris Explores The CIA, LSD & Mind Control

There are documentarians and then there are storytellers, and Errol Morris firmly fits in the latter category. While the director is best known for efforts like “Gates Of Heaven,” “The Fog Of War,” and “A Brief History Of Time,” his latest effort “Wormwood” probably falls more in line with his docu-drama classic, “The Thin Blue Line.” And Netflix has given the legendary filmmaker six episodes to unfold this fascinating story.

Continue reading ‘Wormwood’ Trailer: Errol Morris Explores The CIA, LSD & Mind Control at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Is Errol Morris’s ‘Wormwood’ a Documentary? Netflix Says Yes, Oscars Say No

Errol Morris has been ahead of the curve ever since he broke out with pet cemetery documentary “Gates of Heaven” in 1978. A decade later, “The Thin Blue Line” wowed critics but alienated the hidebound documentary community with its use of “reenactments” and a rousing Philip Glass score. Decades before Netflix created “Making a Murderer,” “The Keepers,” and “Witness,” Morris’ film actually solved a murder mystery and freed an innocent Death Row convict in a Texas prison.

Since then, Glass became a go-to movie composer, earning three Oscar nominations — and could score a fourth for this year’s Oscar documentary frontrunner “Jane.” Reenactments have become standard issue for nonfiction films, filling the void between talking heads, archival footage, cinéma vérité observation, and what isn’t visually available. And Morris isn’t the only filmmaker who is a presence in his films, yelling at his subjects from behind his invention, the Interrotron.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Is Errol Morris’s ‘Wormwood’ a Documentary? Netflix Says Yes, Oscars Say No

  • Indiewire
Errol Morris has been ahead of the curve ever since he broke out with pet cemetery documentary “Gates of Heaven” in 1978. A decade later, “The Thin Blue Line” wowed critics but alienated the hidebound documentary community with its use of “reenactments” and a rousing Philip Glass score. Decades before Netflix created “Making a Murderer,” “The Keepers,” and “Witness,” Morris’ film actually solved a murder mystery and freed an innocent Death Row convict in a Texas prison.

Since then, Glass became a go-to movie composer, earning three Oscar nominations — and could score a fourth for this year’s Oscar documentary frontrunner “Jane.” Reenactments have become standard issue for nonfiction films, filling the void between talking heads, archival footage, cinéma vérité observation, and what isn’t visually available. And Morris isn’t the only filmmaker who is a presence in his films, yelling at his subjects from behind his invention, the Interrotron.
See full article at Indiewire »

Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’

  • Indiewire
Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’
New York City’s annual Doc NYC festival kicks off this week, including a full-to-bursting slate of some of this year’s most remarkable documentaries. If you’ve been looking to beef up on your documentary consumption, Doc NYC is the perfect chance to check out a wide variety of some of the year’s best fact-based features. Ahead, we pick out 14 of our most anticipated films from the fest, including some awards contenders, a handful of buzzy debuts, and a number of festival favorites. Take a look and start filling up your schedule now.

Doc NYC runs November 9 – 16 in New York City.

EuroTrump

Donald Trump may seem like a sui generis figure, a one-of-a-kind monster who was forged in a perfect storm of racism, tweets, and chaos, but history suggests that he’s really just a new breed of an old type. You don’t even have to look
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Movies About the Afterlife — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Movies About the Afterlife — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of David Lowery’s “A Ghost Story,” what is the best movie about the afterlife?

Kate Erbland (@katerbland), IndieWire

It will come as no surprise to anyone that, as a child, I watched a lot of television. A lot. I was mostly obsessed with HBO — our single movie channel, number 2 on the dial; yes, my childhood TV had a dial, don’t ask — with intermittent deviations into mostly inappropriate mini-series (thus explaining my rarely disclosed expertise on “The Thornbirds”), and was pretty much given free range to watch whatever the hell I wanted, whenever I wanted. This is why my favorite
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Don’t Think Twice,’ ‘Green Room,’ ‘Burn After Reading,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Amour Fou (Jessica Hausner)

An ecstatically original work of film-history-philosophy with a digital-cinema palette of acutely crafted compositions. Amour Fou seamlessly blends together the paintings of Vermeer, the acting of Bresson, and the psychological undercurrents of a Dostoevsky novel. It is an intensely thrilling and often slyly comic work that manages to combine a passionately dispassionate love story of the highest order with a larger socio-historical examination of a new era of freedom,
See full article at The Film Stage »

4 Reasons Distributors Should Buy Errol Morris Gem ‘The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman’s Portrait Photography’

4 Reasons Distributors Should Buy Errol Morris Gem ‘The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman’s Portrait Photography’
Errol Morris is best known as an influential and Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker (“The Fog of War”), but he’s also a master of the short form who commands big bucks shooting commercials and episodic television. Then there’s the New York Times op-docs and essays, his many deep dives into photography and the bestsellers such as “Believing is Seeing: Observations on the Mysteries of Photography” and “A Wilderness of Error: The Trials of Jeffrey MacDonald.” However, none of this prepared me for his latest gem of a film,”The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman’s Portrait Photography,” a gentle exploration of a woman who’s also one of Morris’ best friends.

Read More: New York Film Festival Announces 2016 Documentary Lineup, Including New Films by Errol Morris and Steve James

Dorfman started out photographing the Beats in the early ’60s and became friends with poet Allen Ginsberg, who she shot many times over the decades.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

4 Reasons Distributors Should Buy Errol Morris Gem ‘The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman’s Portrait Photography’

  • Indiewire
4 Reasons Distributors Should Buy Errol Morris Gem ‘The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman’s Portrait Photography’
Errol Morris is best known as an influential and Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker (“The Fog of War”), but he’s also a master of the short form who commands big bucks shooting commercials and episodic television. Then there’s the New York Times op-docs and essays, his many deep dives into photography and the bestsellers such as “Believing is Seeing: Observations on the Mysteries of Photography” and “A Wilderness of Error: The Trials of Jeffrey MacDonald.” However, none of this prepared me for his latest gem of a film,”The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman’s Portrait Photography,” a gentle exploration of a woman who’s also one of Morris’ best friends.

Read More: New York Film Festival Announces 2016 Documentary Lineup, Including New Films by Errol Morris and Steve James

Dorfman started out photographing the Beats in the early ’60s and became friends with poet Allen Ginsberg, who she shot many times over the decades.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Dank Meme of the Mountains: Werner Herzog's Comic Side

  • MUBI
StroszekWerner Herzog is funny. It’s unfortunate that this needs to be restated, but such is the cultural conversation—between those who seem not to have taken Land of Silence and Darkness (1971) seriously enough (if at all) and those who prefer their auteurs give off the rarified air of a Tarkovsky, musing under a tree. Of course, the truth is both and neither; that Herzog has always been one for whom exercises in the absurd or even slapstick come in lock step with declarations of his artistic chops. The missing of this proverbial boat is epitomized in “The memeification of Werner Herzog: Why the respected director should be respected for his genius, not regarded as a joke,” published in the National Post last month. The article argues un-controversially that Werner Herzog is a very good filmmaker always worthy of more attention, but then argues that in spite of what
See full article at MUBI »

6 More Filmmaking Tips from Werner Herzog

6 More Filmmaking Tips From Werner Herzog

If there’s anyone who deserves a second Filmmaking Tips column, it’s Werner Herzog. It’s been almost four years since we posted the first list of his advice to fellow soldiers of cinema, and there’s just so much more to learn from the legend. He actually has his own Rogue Film School, where he directly imparts his wisdom to students during weekend seminars. He also leads a new online course at MasterClass, which began this week, where he talks about all facets of fiction and nonfiction filmmaking in a six-hour video course. He does many interviews (this week he participated in a Reddit Ama) and shares his philosophies and strategies often. Not even two of these columns properly sums it all up.

So, as is often the case, this is just an introduction to some essential tips from a unique artist and craftsman. Herzog
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Master Interviewer Errol Morris Proves a Slippery Subject at Idfa Q&A

Master Interviewer Errol Morris Proves a Slippery Subject at Idfa Q&A
According to documentary filmmaker Errol Morris’ own interview philosophy, through which he has coaxed controversial personalities ranging from Donald Rumsfeld to Robert S. McNamara to Fred A. Leuchter into revealing an unexpected side of themselves oncamera, “If you leave people alone and don’t interrupt them, within three or four minutes, they’ll show you just how crazy they really are.”

Audiences of the Intl. Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam got to see that theory in action as Morris, who’d been invited as Idfa’s central guest, commandeered a 90-minute masterclass, all but ignoring film theorist and moderator Bill Nichols’ questions as he spun amusing anecdotes and ideas for the overcrowded Pathe Tuschinski theater.

Nichols opened the session by likening the revolutionary impact of Morris’ “The Thin Blue Line” on the documentary medium to Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey,” rolling a clip that cut from the bone a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Errol Morris's 10 Documentaries to Watch List: Have You Seen Them All?

Errol Morris's 10 Documentaries to Watch List: Have You Seen Them All?
Every year the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (Nov 18-29) invites a key documentarian to make a list of non-fiction films to screen in the festival. In the past they've gone to the likes of Werner Herzog, Krzysztof Kieslowski, Ulrich Seidl, Heddy Honigmann and Rithy Panh. Morris’s Top 10 picks, below, include films by Herzog and Luis Bunuel. Morris will also conduct a Master Class moderated by doc maven Bill Nichols. And Idfa will also show six Morris films starting with his first, "Gates of Heaven" (1978), and running through "The Thin Blue Line," "Fast Cheap And Out Of Control," "Mr. Death: The Rise And Fall Of Fred A. Leuchter, Jr.," his Oscar-winning "The Fog Of War," the hilarious "Tabloid" and confounding "The Unknown Known." Morris's full list goes back in time and does not include all usual suspects; it leans toward the avant-garde. I share his love...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Errol Morris reveals Idfa top 10

Errol Morris reveals Idfa top 10
The festival will screen ten films picked by the Us filmmaker, who will also take part in a masterclass.

Errol Morris, the reverred documentary filmmaker, has revealed his top 10 programme for this year’s International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (Nov 18-29).

Each year, the festival invites an important figure in the world of documentary to compile a list of ten important works of factual film, all of which will be screened as part of the programme.

Morris’ selections include Werner Herzog’s surreal Fata Morgana, which is set in the Sahara Desert and features an exclusively Leonard Cohen soundtrack, and Dziga Vertov’s experimental early film Man With A Movie Camera.

Idfa will also show six of Morris’ films including his 1978 debut Gates of Heaven and his seminal investigative piece The Thin Blue Line.

Further screenings of his films will be: Fast Cheap And Out Of Control; Mr. Death: The Rise And Fall Of Fred A
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Why 1980 Was the Best Year in Movie History

  • Hitfix
Why 1980 Was the Best Year in Movie History
All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century. Click here for a complete list of our essays. How to decide in the grand scheme of things which film year stands above all others? History gives us no clear methodology to unravel this thorny but extremely important question. Is it the year with the highest average score of movies? So a year that averages out to a B + might be the winner over a field strewn with B’s, despite a few A +’s. Or do a few masterpieces lift up a year so far that whatever else happened beyond those three or four films is of no consequence? Both measures are worthy, and the winner by either of those would certainly be a year not to be sneezed at. But I contend the only true measure of a year’s
See full article at Hitfix »

Criterion Collection: Gates of Heaven / Vernon, Florida | Blu-ray Review

Long before he developed the still controversial cinematic technique of utilizing reenactments in The Thin Blue Line or his confessional-esque straight-to-lens Interrotron which was used for the first time in Fast, Cheap and Out of Control and continues to employ in works like his recent It’s Not Crazy, It’s Sports series for Espn, Errol Morris was struck by the absurdities found within the average American. Superbly paired together in their first HD home releases by the Criterion Collection, Morris’s first two features, Gates of Heaven and Vernon, Florida, simply observe the expressive outpourings of rural folk, the lens taking in their unaccountably amusing opinions, worries and musings on life and local events with local, unadorn color featuring above all.

The start of Morris’s filmmaking career unfolded in the wake of working alongside friend and provocateur Werner Herzog on Stroszek after failing to follow through with his
See full article at ioncinema »

Errol Morris on His Early Films, and What He Thinks of The Jinx

  • Vulture
Errol Morris on His Early Films, and What He Thinks of The Jinx
This week sees the release of wonderful new Criterion editions of three of the greatest documentaries of all time: Errol Morris’s first three films, Gates of Heaven, Vernon, Florida, and The Thin Blue Line. Re-watching these films, it’s at times odd to think that the same man made them: Gates of Heaven is the deadpan, deliberate tale of pet cemeteries in California; Vernon, Florida is a weirdly meditative, austere portrait of the offbeat personalities in a rural southern town. And The Thin Blue Line, one of the most influential documentaries of all time, is a gripping investigation into a cop killing in Texas — complete with an evocatively tense Philip Glass score, stylized cinematography, and detailed, cinematic slow-motion reenactments. (The film was famously instrumental in the eventual release of Randall Dale Adams, who had been wrongfully convicted of the murder and condemned to die in the electric chair.) But
See full article at Vulture »

Interview: Errol Morris Talks His Criterion Releases, Why 'The Unknown Known' Is "Superior" To 'Fog Of War' & More

A pet cemetery in California, two Secretaries of Defense, and numerous Ronald McDonalds lauding the cuisine of Taco Bell are among the sundry subjects in Errol Morris’ body of work. This Academy Award-winning filmmaker has been working steadily since 1978, crafting a number of invigorating documentaries that examine the way people orate, and what it reveals about themselves and the world around them. He gives special attention not just to how people say the things they do, but also to the things they don’t say. The Criterion Collection has graciously decided to shine a light on Morris’s first three films: “Gates of Heaven,” which chronicles the transportation of hundreds of dead animals from one pet cemetery to another; “Vernon, Florida,” a portrait of various residents of the titular town; and the game-changing “The Thin Blue Line,” which made reenactments a viable asset to documentarians, and more importantly, set a wrongfully convicted man free.
See full article at The Playlist »

Twenty Two Good to Great New Releases on DVD/Blu-ray This Week, Plus Muck

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! We were off last week due to SXSW 2015, so new releases from March 17th *and* March 24th are covered below. If you see something you like, click on the title to buy it from Amazon. The Sure Thing Walter (John Cusack) is only in his first year of college, but he already realizes that he’s flunking at life’s most important subject — love. Well, maybe that’s overstating things a bit, but he is lacking in the romance department, so when a friend on the West coast invites him for a visit with the promise of a sure thing in the form of a hot California girl jonesing to hook up Walter sets off on a cross-country drive. The one catch is the forced presence of Alison (Daphne Zuniga) on the road trip, but Walter’s willing to risk this hellish drive for a shot at female perfection. Surprise
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

New to Blu-ray: The Hobbit, Unbroken, Into The Woods, and More

This week’s new Blu-ray releases include a trio of big films that opened in theaters this past December, a groundbreaking documentary classic on Criterion, and more. Click on the links below to purchase: The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (Blu-ray 3D + Blu-ray + DVD + UltraViolet Combo Pack) - $27.99 (38% off) The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD UltraViolet Combo Pack) - $24.96 (44% off) Into the Woods (Blu-ray + Digital HD) - $19.99 (50% off) Unbroken (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD with UltraViolet) - $19.99 (43% off) Song One [Blu-ray] - $13.59 (32% off) The Thin Blue Line [Blu-ray] (Criterion Collection) - $22.99 (42% off) Gates of Heaven/Vernon, Florida [Blu-ray] (Criterion Collection) - $27.59 (31% off)

The post New to Blu-ray: The Hobbit, Unbroken, Into The Woods, and More appeared first on Collider.
See full article at Collider.com »

'Hobbit', 'Into the Woods', 'Unbroken' & 'Thin Blue Line' on DVD and Blu-ray This Week

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies We know this won't be the last we hear of The Hobbit as there will have to be the release of the extended edition and then there are box sets to consider, but we are getting closer to the end of our association with Middle Earth and it actually reminds me, what is Peter Jackson going to do nowc

Unbroken It's amazing to think that about a year ago we all thought this one had the best chance at winning Best Picture and now here we are, a year later and no one could really care less.

Into the Woods I really disliked this movie, but Mike, our resident lover of musicals, loved it. It's a story that cares nothing for its characters and feels like two movies smushed together to form a Frankenstein of a musical, and wow, the songs, I'm
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »
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