6.1/10
6,672
73 user 55 critic

Eyes of Laura Mars (1978)

A famous fashion photographer develops a disturbing ability to see through the eyes of a killer.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

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From $3.99 (HD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
John Neville
...
Tommy Ludlow
...
Donald Phelps
...
Michael Reisler (as R.J.)
Frank Adonis ...
Sal Volpe
...
Michele
...
Lulu
Rose Gregorio ...
Elaine Cassell
...
Himself
Steve Marachuk ...
Robert
Meg Mundy ...
Doris Spenser
Marilyn Meyers ...
Sheila Weissman
Gary Bayer ...
Reporter
...
Reporter
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Storyline

Suddenly Laura Mars can see through the eyes of a serial killer as he commits his crimes. She contacts the police and with the aid of a police detective, tries to stop the killer. But first, they have to figure out who it is. Written by Brian W Martz <B.Martz@Genie.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Mystery | Thriller

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

2 August 1978 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Eyes  »

Box Office

Budget:

$7,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$20,000,000 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The spec script that John Carpenter sold producers was simply entitled "Eyes." It was extensively rewritten, the ending (and the killer's identity) was changed, and he had nothing to do with the final product, issued just months prior to his own breakout hit "Halloween." See more »

Goofs

When Laura enters her studio above the empty warehouse, she is wearing red high-heeled shoes. When she runs in terror through the warehouse, she is wearing sneakers, but immediately afterwards, she is once again wearing the high-heeled shoes. See more »

Quotes

Answering machine: [Recorded greeting on Michele and Lulu's answering machine] This is Lulu and Michele. We're not here, so go to hell! But if you're not a horny creep, leave a message at the beep!
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Crazy Credits

The film's closing credits roll over the first image of the movie, a black and white image of Laura's eyes as a negative. See more »

Connections

References Gone with the Wind (1939) See more »

Soundtracks

(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty
Performed by KC & The Sunshine Band (as K.C. and the Sunshine Band)
Written by Harry Wayne Casey (uncredited) & Richard Finch (uncredited)
Produced by Harry Wayne Casey (as K.C.) - Richard Finch (as Finch) for Sunshine Sound Enterprises Inc.
Courtesy of T.K. Records
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User Reviews

 
Better Than It Had To Be
31 January 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Jon Peters' first production as he transformed himself (with girlfriend Barbra Streisand's help) from hairdresser to movie producer, the movie is a gem of Seventies style at it's finest. The clothes, the hair, makeup, music, attitude, interiors and locations ride the crest of the high-style wave that flooded the world through the Eighties. Combining the improbable worlds of violence and fashion, with a story that centers on a famous photographer (Dunaway) and her ability to *see* her friends and colleagues being stalked and murdered, *Eyes* has moments of serious suspense, but that's hardly the reason to see this movie. Utilizing the actual photography of fashion god Helmut Newton, the film maker has exquisitely captured the 1978 New York fashion and disco scene in a way that none of the recent looks at the Seventies has been able to, but then, again, this movie was *made* in 1978, not 27 years later. The scenes of photo shoots are particularly fun to watch, with one scene portraying a burning car crash in Columbus Circle in which the models, clad in garter belts and fur coats cat-fight before the camera. The ingenuous use of *real* models add the precise amount of vacuity necessary to make the surreal shot work. Another photo shoot involves a model dead from a gunshot to his heart lying in a pool surrounded by exotically dressed disco-dancing models and a throbbing disco beat. The plot is secondary to style in this movie, and style is the only reason this movie should be remembered. Favorite moment: Darlanne Fluegel as the model Lulu haplessly trying to explain to the press *why* violence is important in fashion photos.


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