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Months of Meryl: Sophie's Choice (1982)

Hi, we’re John and Matt and, icymi, we are watching every single live-action film starring Streep...

#8 — Sophie Zawistowska, a Polish Holocaust survivor now fighting back personal demons as a Brooklyn émigré.

John: Meryl Streep is as defined by Sophie’s Choice as Tiffany's is by diamonds. Her “choice” is perhaps the most notorious scene in Streep’s oeuvre, known by people who have no idea that The Deer Hunter or Silkwood or Ironweed even exist. In only our eighth entry, we have already arrived at the performance in which the legend of Streep was crystallized forever...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Oscars flashback: Meryl Streep exclaims ‘Holy mackerel’ winning her 1st Oscar for ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’ [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Meryl Streep exclaims ‘Holy mackerel’ winning her 1st Oscar for ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’ [Watch]
Believe it or not, long before a record-shattering 21 Oscar nominations, there was a time when Meryl Streep was not the queen of the movies. After finishing at Yale Drama School in the 1970s, Streep found steady work on stage and television before her breakout role in 1978’s Best Picture Oscar winner, “The Deer Hunter.” That film brought Streep her first Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress (and first loss) for her performance as Linda, the fiancee of a troubled Vietnam vet (Christopher Walken in an Oscar-winning performance).

The following year she starred in three major films: as the love interest of Alan Alda in “The Seduction of Joe Tynan;” as Woody Allen’s lesbian ex-wife in “Manhattan;” and as the troubled Joanna Kramer opposite Dustin Hoffman in “Kramer vs Kramer.” It was that latter role that brought her a first-ever win at the Academy Awards. The first words exclaimed by Streep were “Holy mackerel!
See full article at Gold Derby »

Exclusive Interviews: Owen Wilson, Ed Helms & Katt Williams on the new comedy Father Figures

Author: Jon Lyus

This week sees the release of Father Figures, which stars a fresh-from-Zoolander 2 Owen Wilson and Ed Helms, himself recently recovered from The Hangover films. The film, a light-hearted tale of a pair of twins searching for their real father, marks the directorial debut of veteran cinematographer Lawrence Sher and has a fine supporting cast including Katt Williams, J. K. Simmons, Glenn Close, Ving Rhames, Harry Shearer and Christopher Walken.

Recently we had the chance to sit down with three stars of the new film, and Danielle DeLaite talked to Wilson and Helms about why their characters were so much fun to play, and how it was working with Christopher Walken and Terry Bradshaw. They also talk about their own parents growing up, and how this influenced their choices in the film. Owen Wilson also gives his reaction to seeing the lightsaber video where his voice
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Win! A Signed ‘Father Figures’ Poster

The hilarious comedy Father Figures is out in cinemas February 16 and to celebrate, Warner Bros. Pictures is giving you the chance to win a poster signed by Ed Helms and Owen Wilson!

In the Alcon Entertainment comedy “Father Figures,” Owen Wilson (“The Grand Budapest Hotel,” “Wedding Crashers”) and Ed Helms (“The Hangover” films, “We’re the Millers”) star as fraternal twins Kyle and Peter who accidentally discover they’ve been living with a lie all their lives. The kindly man in the photo on their mantle isn’t their father after all, but an invention their mother (Glenn Close) concocted to conceal the truth: that she actually doesn’t know who their real father is. See, it was the seventies, and things were crazy, and…well, you know. Armed with only a handful of clues, the brothers resolve to find the mystery man in what results in a wild road
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Is Meryl Streep the greatest film performer of all time? According to Oscar voters over the past 40 years, that might just be the case with her record shattering 21 nominations and 3 wins. She earned her latest bid for the 2017 film “The Post” for portraying “Washington Post” publisher Kay Graham in the Steven Spielberg movie. Where does her latest entry rank in her filmography? Tour through our photo gallery above of Streep’s 25 greatest performances ranked from worst to best.

Streep snagged her first Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress for “The Deer Hunter” (1978) and picked up her first trophy in that category the very next year for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979). She subsequently snagged two prizes in the lead category (“Sophie’s Choice” in 1982 and “The Iron Lady” in 2011) and competed 17 more times: Best Actress for “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” (1981), “Silkwood” (1983), “Out of Africa” (1985), “Ironweed” (1987), “A Cry in the Dark” (1988), “Postcards from the Edge
See full article at Gold Derby »

Journey's End and Ptsd in films

Edgar Jones Feb 2, 2018

Professor Edgar Jones writes for us on the portrayal in cinema of post-traumatic stress disorder...

War has served as an enduring theme for the commercial cinema, not least because of the dramatic opportunities it offers for warrior characters. However, since the Vietnam War significant attention has been directed to the ways in which trauma can change people film and cause lasting psychological harm. Both The Deer Hunter (Michael Cimino, 1978) and Apocalypse Now (Francis Ford Coppola, 1979) showed veterans struggling to cope with their wartime experiences. Such movies tapped into growing popular and professional concern about the long-term impact of combat on soldiers’ minds.

In 1980, the American Psychiatric Association formally adopted the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (Ptsd) based on clinical evidence largely derived from veterans of the Vietnam conflict. Filmmakers were increasingly drawn to the theme of psychological breakdown as a way of interpreting the war and Ptsd
See full article at Den of Geek »

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition
This article marks Part 2 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

In 1978, Meryl Streep, already renowned for her work on the New York stage, grabbed the attention of moviegoers across the country with her Oscar-nominated turn in the Best Picture champ “The Deer Hunter.” That year, however, would seem minor in comparison to what was on the horizon in 1979.

Streep was about to work with three of the decade’s hottest directors – Woody Allen, at his most in-demand after “Annie Hall” (1977) and “Interiors” (1978); Robert Benton, whose “The Late Show” (1977) was a big hit; and Jerry Schatzberg, who won critical acclaim with “The Panic in Needle Park” (1971) and “Scarecrow” (1973).

The resulting trio of Allen’s “Manhattan,” Benton’s “Kramer vs.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘The Deer Hunter’: A look back at her first Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The Deer Hunter’: A look back at her first Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 1 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

Prior to 1978, Meryl Streep was best-known for her acclaimed New York stage work. She made five Broadway appearances between 1975 and 1977, including a turn in “A Memory of Two Mondays/27 Wagons Full of Cotton” (1976) that brought Streep her first – and to date, only – Tony Award nomination. Her sole big screen appearance was a small, albeit memorable, turn opposite Jane Fonda in “Julia” (1977).

Streep’s name recognition increased significantly in 1978. First, there was her much-heralded performance in the epic NBC miniseries “Holocaust” that resulted in an Emmy Award. It was her second-ever appearance in a feature film, however – and in a Best Picture Academy Awards winner, no
See full article at Gold Derby »

Months of Meryl: The Seduction of Joe Tynan (1979)

Hi, we’re John and Matt and, icymi, we are watching every single live-action film starring Streep.

#4 — Karen Traynor, a Southern political operative who has an affair with a popular senator.

John: I can’t even imagine what it must have felt like to be an actressexual in 1979, the year when Meryl Streep catapulted herself from that interesting, up-and-coming actress of The Deer Hunter, the Holocaust miniseries (which brought her first Emmy win), and the New York theater scene, to first-class movie star, appearing in three successful films and winning her first Oscar for the year’s highest-grosser and Best Picture champ, Kramer vs. Kramer. But let’s not get too ahead of ourselves; buried in the middle of all this impressive acclaim is perhaps Streep’s least-known triumph of her early period: Jerry Schatzberg’s The Seduction of Joe Tynan.

This story of a liberal senator (Alan Alda, who
See full article at FilmExperience »

Meryl Streep Joins ‘Big Little Lies’ Season 2

Meryl Streep Joins ‘Big Little Lies’ Season 2
Meryl Streep has joined the cast of “Big Little Lies” Season 2 on HBO, Variety has learned.

Streep will play Mary Louise Wright, the mother of Perry Wright (Alexander Skarsgård). Concerned for the well-being of her grandchildren following her son Perry’s death, Mary Louise arrives in Monterey searching for answers.

The news comes on the heels of Streep receiving an Oscar nomination for her leading role in Steven Spielberg’s “The Post.” With the nomination, Streep broke her own record for the most Oscar acting nominations, bringing her total number of nods to 21. She has also been nominated for her roles in films like “The Deer Hunter,” “Kramer vs. Kramer,” “Silkwood,” and “The Devil Wears Prada.” She has won three Oscars throughout her career. Sources tell Variety that Streep will make around $800,000 per episode.

Streep is repped by CAA.

HBO announced in December that “Big Little Lies” would return for a second season, with most of
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Meryl Streep Breaks Own Record With 21st Oscar Nomination

Meryl Streep Breaks Own Record With 21st Oscar Nomination
Meryl Streep has broken her own Oscar record.

The actress received her 21st Academy Award nomination, in the best actress category, for her performance as Katherine Graham in “The Post.”

The nod extends Streep’s record by nine over Katharine Hepburn and Jack Nicholson, who are tied in second place with a dozen each.

Streep has won Oscars for “Kramer vs. Kramer” in 1979, “Sophie’s Choice” in 1982, and “The Iron Lady” in 2011. She’s received four nominations since then for “August: Osage County,” “Into the Woods,” “Florence Foster Jenkins,” and now “The Post.”

Streep also nabbed a Golden Globe nomination for best actress in a drama for “The Post,” but lost to “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” star Frances McDormand.

Her performance as the widowed Graham has been widely praised for its nuance as her character deals with the fallout from her 1971 decision for The Washington Post to publish the Pentagon Papers in the face of opposition
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hooray! May the Comment Party Begin Again...

And there was much rejoicing. I can "hear" you all again. You can hear each other. We didn't expect to take a vow of collective silence but I had just watched Novitiate, that movie about the nuns, in which The LEOgend is very very upset when people talk during conversation blackout periods so perhaps I spiritually triggered it? Anyway... Please Say Something To End The Silence.

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See full article at FilmExperience »

Months of Meryl: The Deer Hunter (1978)

Hi, we’re John and Matt and, in case you missed it, we are watching every single feature film starring Meryl Streep.

#2 — Linda, a working-class girl waiting for the return of her fiancé (and her fiancé’s pal) from Vietnam.

John: The Deer Hunter is a mammoth film, both an epic tale of a soldier’s journey to hell and back (and back again), and an intimate communal study. Meryl Streep is Linda, engaged to Nick (Christopher Walken) but in love with his best friend Michael (Robert De Niro). Streep is given an underwritten part and asked to stand-in for ideas about femininity — and often simply femininity itself — in a picture dripping with testosterone. The film carefully takes stock of its male relationships, tracing masculine bravado from the Pennsylvania mines to the roulette dens of Vietnam, both critical of masculinity and uncommonly poignant in uncovering the deep bonds that exist between men.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Meryl Streep Shares Thoughts on Oprah 2020, Can’t Remember Her Oscar Noms

Meryl Streep Shares Thoughts on Oprah 2020, Can’t Remember Her Oscar Noms
Meryl Streep stopped by “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” Monday night to promote her new film “The Post,” where she gave her two cents on Oprah potentially making a presidential bid and failed to remember the 20 films for which she’s received Oscar nominations.

Oprah’s speech accepting the Cecil B. DeMille award was one of the highlights of the 75th Golden Globe Awards, and added fuel to the long-simmering rumor that Oprah may run for president in 2020. Of the Globes, Streep said, “Oprah launched her presidential campaign, I think.”

She added that if Oprah were to run for president, she wouldn’t be against it, and joked that perhaps Hollywood should stage a White House takeover.

“Somebody from the stage [mentioned] Tom Hanks, and he seemed ready to go,” she said. “That would be a pretty good ticket. … You could just keep it in Hollywood, you know, you could have The Rock as the joint chief of staff, [link
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of Father Figures In St. Louis

Owen Wilson (“The Grand Budapest Hotel,” “Zoolander 2”) and Ed Helms (“The Hangover” films, “We’re the Millers”) star in the Alcon Entertainment comedy “Father Figures,” marking the directorial debut of veteran cinematographer Lawrence Sher (“The Hangover” films).

Wilson and Helms are Kyle and Peter Reynolds, brothers whose eccentric mother raised them to believe their father had died when they were young. When they discover this to be a lie, they set out together to find their real father, and end up learning more about their mother than they probably ever wanted to know.

The film also stars J.K. Simmons (“Whiplash”), comedian Katt Williams, NFL Hall of Fame quarterback-turned-actor Terry Bradshaw, Ving Rhames (the “Mission Impossible” films), Harry Shearer (“The Simpsons”), and Oscar nominee June Squibb (“Nebraska”), with Oscar winner Christopher Walken (“The Deer Hunter”), and Oscar nominee Glenn Close (“Albert Nobbs,” “Guardians of the Galaxy”) as the twins’ mother.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Turning 40: 3 Great Movies Released in 1978

We live in an age of revivals, reboots, and remakes. Hollywood seems to have lost the taste for original stories, preferring to reach back to the successful movies of the past, hoping to be able to play it safe and pocket a hefty profit in the process. Sometimes, it works – the remake of Stephen King’s “It” has proven this – and other times, it doesn’t – just think of the dismal reviews (and pretty lousy revenues) of this year’s “The Mummy”, which might have been a profitable movie per se, with its $400 million-plus debut against a $375 million budget, buy a disappointing debut for Universal’s “Dark Universe”.

Next year, many of the most famous and well-known movie franchises of our times will celebrate their thirtieth anniversaries. Some of these will be marked by remakes hitting the screens, either in the cinemas or through other mediums, such as video games,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “The Deer Hunter”

The Deer Hunter is a tragic story about a group of friends that are bit rowdy and out of control at times but are still there for one another when they need to be. They know as they reach their manhood that two things are going to be expected of them, that these are rites of passage that people in their town expect of them. They’ll get married, and/or they’ll enter the military. Well when the time comes they get shipped off to Vietnam, and eventually the horror begins. At one point they’re captured and forced to endure the kind

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “The Deer Hunter
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Turkeys

Each year the film industry sacrifices one of its blockbusters to the movie gods, in the hope that its other releases will be spared the vicious lash of mass opprobrium. This year the designated victim was Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets. Critics spotted Luc Besson’s space opera on the horizon, sensed weakness, singled it out from the big budget herd, and moved in for the kill, savaging it as, “a stinker”, “a travesty of storytelling” and, “one of the worst films I have ever seen”. Social media gleefully swooped on the carcass to declare it the year’s biggest Doa turkey. And all this before the public had even had a chance to see it.

Rotten Tomatoes gave Valerian a 49% rating, but looking at the site’s reviews round-up (something I do only when writing a piece like this), I’m struck now by how many
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Thank You for Your Service’ Review: Miles Teller Stars in a Clunky but Crucial Drama About What Supporting the Troops Really Means

‘Thank You for Your Service’ Review: Miles Teller Stars in a Clunky but Crucial Drama About What Supporting the Troops Really Means
Thank You for Your Service” begins on an Iraqi rooftop, where a young American soldier named Michael Adam Emory (Scott Haze) is shot in the head by a distant sniper. But the key moment of the sequence doesn’t come until a few seconds later, as Sergeant Adam Schumann (Miles Teller) slings his severely wounded comrade over his shoulder and races him down a sandy flight of stairs. It would be hard — almost superhuman — for Schumann to negotiate the descent even without Emory’s blood streaming into his eyes and the foundation quaking from the firefight outside. So he drops him. Not on purpose, of course, but there are some weights that men aren’t meant to carry. And when Schumann returns to his wife and kids in Kansas, it’s Emory who haunts him the most — not the guys who died, but the guy he dropped.

That acute, pervasive
See full article at Indiewire »

Antalya Festival: A Modest Christopher Walken Talks ‘King of New York,’ His Acting Style and Michael Cimino

Antalya Festival: A Modest Christopher Walken Talks ‘King of New York,’ His Acting Style and Michael Cimino
Antalya, Turkey — Veteran character actor Christopher Walken, at the Antalya Fest to screen his 1990 cult hit, Abel Ferrara’s “King of New York,” recalled that his mafia kingpin role – like many of his turns – grew out of his roots in the streets of Queens.

“My old neighborhood when I was kid, that’s where I come from, so the movie was very close to me,” he said, speaking to audiences at the Ataturk Culture Park cinema. “Abel was lucky to have such good actors. It was a highlight of my life.”

As for how he fell into acting on screen, in this case manifesting in himself the distinctive mobster Frank White, Walken confessed, “I don’t know. I became an actor after being a dancer, kind of accidentally.”

Even after 100 roles, Walken admits he still isn’t sure he’s doing things right.

“I don’t think I do it like other actors do it. I just pretend
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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