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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2001

1-20 of 23 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Oscars 2017: Sara Bareilles to Perform During 'In Memoriam' -- Why It Will Be the Saddest Ever

23 February 2017 1:06 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

2016 saw the unexpected and untimely deaths of a slew of beloved icons and screen legends, which means viewers can expect one monumental In Memoriam segment at the 88th Annual Academy Awards on Sunday.

It was announced on Thursday that Sara Bareilles will be performing during the emotional tribute. "Sara’s unique artistry will honor those we’ve lost in our community including familiar faces and those behind the scenes who have enriched the art of moviemaking," producers Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd said in a statement.

The tribute will no doubt have everyone in tears, especially when you consider just how many icons have passed away since last year's awards show.

Photos: Stars We've Lost In Recent Years

Looking back over the past year, here are just a few of the late stars who will likely be honored at this year's Oscars ceremony.

Getty Images

Comedian and actor Garry Shandling, who died on »

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My favourite best picture Oscar winner: The Sting

22 February 2017 5:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Continuing our series of Guardian writers’ picks of the great Academy Award winners, Andrew Pulver explains why the Paul Newman and Robert Redford caper is the most purely enjoyable film in Oscar history

No one, in all honesty, would go to the best picture Oscar list for a defining rundown of the best American cinema. Too many short-shelf life films get through the voting process and rise to the top: Crash? A Beautiful Mind? Really? Middling-to-decent tends to triumph. Actual dyed-in-the-wool classics are rare: The Deer Hunter and The Godfather, and possibly No Country for Old Men and Birdman, are among the only highlights of the past five decades.

Related: My favorite best picture Oscar winner: Unforgiven

Continue reading »

- Andrew Pulver

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ ‘Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown,’ and More

21 February 2017 7:44 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Fireworks Wednesday (Asghar Farhadi)

After a festival tour back in 2006, Asghar Farhadi’s Fireworks Wednesday was theatrically re-released by the newly established Grasshopper Films, and now it’s arriving on DVD. The drama is another precisely calibrated, culturally specific demonstration of Farhadi’s skills in constructing empathy machines. Further in line with the director’s filmography, this story has a nesting-doll structure that combines ingrained social hierarchies, domestic drama, and a tragic intersection of misunderstandings. And while it »

- The Film Stage

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‘The Red Turtle’ Director Michaël Dudok de Wit’s 10 Favorite Films

16 February 2017 11:30 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

If one is looking to experience a dose of astonishing beauty, now in theaters in the Oscar-nominated animation The Red Turtle. A co-production with Studio Ghibli, Michaël Dudok de Wit’s first feature-length film is a humble, patient drama with an emotionally rich finale. To celebrate its theatrical release here in the U.S., we’re highlighting the director’s all-time favorite films, which he submitted to BFI‘s latest Sight & Sound poll. Featuring classics from Kubrick, Cimino, Kurosawa, and more, on the animation side, he makes sure to recognize a Miyazaki masterwork, along with a seminal Disney film.

“Just before the team arrived, Studio Ghibli called me and said, ‘We’ve been thinking about the list of words that are supposed to be spoken in the film and we think you should drop the dialogue entirely,'” the director told us, speaking about the production process of his film. »

- Jordan Raup

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Arrival,’ ‘The Edge of Seventeen,’ ‘The Tree of Wooden Clogs’ & More

14 February 2017 6:50 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arrival (Denis Villeneuve)

Within the alien subgenre, there lies another. Therein, knowledge is treasure and the fifth dimension is love. The major rule: once the mystery and the chills have subsided, the revelations are enlightening and the welcomes warm. Thankfully, Denis Villeneuve‘s Arrival is more worthwhile than that. The film juggles a bit of world-building with meaty, compelling characters while trying to make linguistics look cool. No easy task, but the film does so in a breeze »

- The Film Stage

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The 2017 Oscar Nominees: Everything you need to know about the Best Actress race

10 February 2017 8:36 AM, PST | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

The 2017 Oscar Nominees: Everything you need to know about the Best Actress race The 2017 Oscar Nominees: Everything you need to know about the Best Actress race Adriana Floridia2/10/2017 11:36:00 Am

This year's Best Actress race is extremely competitive.

Some of our favourite performances couldn't secure the nomination, and it was simply because there were so many incredible female performances. We're sad that names like Annette Bening for 20th Century Women, Amy Adams for Arrival and Hailee Steinfeld for The Edge of Seventeen weren't among the nominees, but we also love the five nominated performances so much. Seriously, it was just a great year for women acting in film, and with the talent out there today, it's always going to be hard, and therefore even more of an honour, to land that Oscar nomination.

Though there's five women in the running here, the race has been pretty much narrowed down to two major threats. »

- Adriana Floridia

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Scott Reviews Alexandre Moors’ The Yellow Birds [Sundance 2017]

3 February 2017 4:08 PM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

In my review of his new film A Ghost Story, I mentioned that David Lowery’s greatest weakness prior to making it was in tying his creativity to slight variations on other people’s movies. Alexandre MoorsThe Yellow Birds, which Lowery cowrote with R.F.I. Porto, suggests he has not completely worked past that stage of his artistic development. A jumbled mix of stock war-film influences (The Deer Hunter, Apocalypse Now, and Platoon remain potent inspirations for men of a certain age), The Yellow Birds features some fine acting and character work inside a plot that tries five different paths without committing to any of them. This could be a potent way to explore the unpredictability of war, but instead feels like a callous attempt to maintain an audience’s interest in what is already plenty interesting – the corrosive effect of violence, no matter who perpetrates it.

Bartle (Alden Ehrenreich »

- Scott Nye

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Richard Portman Dies: ‘Star Wars’ Sound Master & ‘Deer Hunter’ Oscar Winner Was 82

31 January 2017 11:37 AM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Richard Portman, an Oscar winner who wove the signature overlapping dialogue on Robert Altman’s 1975 landmark Nashville into a complex and hypnotic tapestry as central to the film as each character, died Saturday night at his home in Betton Hills, Fl. Celebrated and 11 times Oscar-nominated for his work as sound editor on films as diverse as Harold and Maude (1971), The Godfather (1972), Star Wars (1977) and The Deer Hunter (the 1978 Michael Cimino film for which he won… »

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Richard Portman, ‘Star Wars’ Sound Engineer and 11-Time Oscar Nominee, Dies at 82

31 January 2017 11:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Sound engineer Richard Portman, who received 11 Academy Award nominations and won for his work on Michael Cimino’s “The Deer Hunter,” died on Saturday at his home in Tallahassee, Fla. He was 82.

“He was an icon of his craft of motion picture sound re-recording, recognized with the highest honors of his field,” his daughter Jennifer Portman wrote on her Facebook page. “He was eccentric, irreverent, and real.”

Portman worked on nearly 200 movies and mixed the sound for George Lucas’ “Star Wars.”

Portman received two Oscar sound nominations in 1973 for Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather” and Michael Ritchie’s “The Candidate.” He was also double-nominated in 1974 for Peter Bogdanovich’s “Paper Moon” and Mike Nichols’ “The Day of the Dolphin.”

Portman received his first nom in 1971 for “Kotch,” directed by Jack Lemmon. He was also up for Oscars for Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein,” Herbert Ross’ “Funny Lady,” Michael Apted’s “Coal Miner’s Daughter, »

- Dave McNary

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Richard Portman, 'Star Wars,' 'The Godfather' and 'Nashville' Sound Man, Dies at 82

30 January 2017 6:32 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Richard Portman, the accomplished sound man who collected 11 Oscar nominations and won for his work on Michael Cimino's The Deer Hunter, has died. He was 82.

Portman, whose prolific list of credits includes Carnal Knowledge (1971), The Godfather (1972), Paper Moon (1973), Star Wars (1977) and Body Heat (1981), died Saturday at his home in Tallahassee, Fla., his daughter, Jennifer Portman, confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter. He had recently suffered a broken hip from a fall.

A perfectionist and rerecording mixing specialist, Porter received a pair of Oscar sound nominations in 1973 for his work on Francis Ford Coppola's The »

- Mike Barnes

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Richard Portman, 'Star Wars,' 'The Godfather' and 'Nashville' Sound Man, Dies at 82

30 January 2017 6:32 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Richard Portman, the accomplished sound man who collected 11 Oscar nominations and won for his work on Michael Cimino's The Deer Hunter, has died. He was 82.

Portman, whose prolific list of credits includes Carnal Knowledge (1971), The Godfather (1972), Paper Moon (1973), Star Wars (1977) and Body Heat (1981), died Saturday at his home in Tallahassee, Fla., his daughter, Jennifer Portman, confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter. He had recently suffered a broken hip from a fall.

A perfectionist and rerecording mixing specialist, Porter received a pair of Oscar sound nominations in 1973 for his work on Francis Ford Coppola's The »

- Mike Barnes

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8 Great Films That Are Under 90 Minutes

29 January 2017 10:00 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

For those of us cinephiles who easily get caught up in the world of a good movie, no runtime is too extreme. We can stay up and watch all four hours of Sergio Leone’s Once Upon a Time in America or all three hours of Oliver Stone’s JFK, Cimino’s The Deer Hunter, or Kubrick’s Spartacus because they’re all great movies.

But as you’ve probably learned by now, not everyone is like us. The eye-widening, masterful technique used by a filmmaker or the suspense a writer incorporates in his or her story is not always enough to keep everyone in their seats for two or three or even four hours. It’s one of the main arguments, or excuses, people use to explain why they prefer TV shows over movies.

We’ve heard it a thousand times: movies are too long (though I never really understood this contention, »

- Luke Parker

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Meryl Streep's Marriage Has Lasted as Long as Her Career

27 January 2017 9:30 AM, PST | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

Meryl Streep knows a thing or two about long-term success, and her marriage is no exception. She and sculptor Don Gummer have been married since 1978, and he's been by her side at a number of industry events and award shows in the years since. Meryl may have been mentioned more than God in Oscars acceptance speeches over the last decade, but at the 2012 Academy Awards, it was her husband who received a sweet shout-out. When Meryl won best actress for The Iron Lady, she said, "First I'm going to thank Don because when you thank your husband at the end of the speech they play him out with the music, and I want him to know that everything I value most in our lives you've given me." The pair first met after her partner John Cazale - of The Godfather and The Deer Hunter - died of bone cancer. She »

- Laura Marie Meyers

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Important War Films From Our Lifetime

25 January 2017 8:03 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

By Sofia Smith-Londono.

War films are often great sprawling stories of sacrifice, heroism, the atrocities and intricacies of war. For many of us, these visceral, telling tales of war are as close as we’ll get, but behind the camera lies an important story of a real life event that has to be told.

Mel Gibson’s new film Hacksaw Ridge out in cinemas on 26th January displays the horror of war and one man’s determination to put a little bit of the world back together again. This is the story of Desmond Doss (BAFTA nominated Andrew Garfield) how he overcame monumental adversity and how he miraculously saved 75 men at the Battle of Okinawa without carrying a weapon

Saving Private Ryan (1998)

Steven Spielberg brings to light the reality of one of the bloodiest wars and most brutal scenes in recent history. The film opens on 6th June 1944, D-Day with the allied invasion of Normandy. »

- The Hollywood News

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10 Fun Facts About the 2017 Oscar Nominees

24 January 2017 12:31 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The 2017 Academy Award nominations were announced Tuesday morning, and “La La Land” was expected to do well. But with 14 nods, it’s tied for the most-nominated movie in Oscar history. Meryl Streep’s nomination was a bit of a surprise but not wholly unexpected, given how much the Academy has historically loved her work.

Check out 10 fun facts and figures about this year’s nominees (compiled with some help from the Academy):

1. With 14 nominations, “La La Land” ties the record held by “All About Eve” (1950) and “Titanic” (1997). “Titanic” won 11 awards, tying it for the winningest film along with “Ben Hur” (1959) and “The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King” (2003).

2. Meryl Streep extends her lead as the most nominated performer with her 20th nomination for “Florence Foster Jenkins.” She earned her first acting nomination for “The Deer Hunter” (1978). Her last win came for “The Iron Lady” (2011).

3. With a running time of 7 hours 47 minutes, »

- Lawrence Yee

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Meryl Streep Responds to Oscar Nomination With a Gif

24 January 2017 10:01 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

How did Meryl Streep respond to her record-setting 20th Oscar nomination? A single Gif.

“Please find the following Gif as a statement on behalf of Meryl Streep,” a Paramount publicist wrote in an email following the nomination announcements Tuesday morning. The Gif in question, which features Streep dancing, originates from the Paul McCartney music video “Queenie Eye.”

The iconic actress was nominated for her role as the questionably-talented opera singer in “Florence Foster Jenkins.” Some of Streep’s other notable nominations include best actress nods for 1983’s “Sophie’s Choice,” 1996’s “The Bridges of Madison County,” and 2007’s “The Devil Wears Prada,” and supporting actress nods for 1979’s “The Deer Hunter,” 1980’s “Kramer vs. Kramer” and 2015’s “Into the Woods.” Of her 20 nominations, she’s taken home three statues for “Kramer vs. Kramer,” “Sophie’s Choice,” and “The Iron Lady.”

Streep’s Oscar nomination comes after being honored for her »

- Jacob Bryant

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Meryl Streep Makes History with 20th Oscar Nom: A Look Back at Her Iconic Nominated Roles

24 January 2017 7:08 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Meryl Streep is defending her (unofficial) title of Queen of the Oscars.

On Tuesday morning, Meryl Streep received her 20th Academy Award nomination — this year in the Best Actress category for her performance in Florence Foster Jenkins. Streep’s nod makes her the most nominated performer in Oscars history. 

In honor of Streep’s incredible feat (which she celebrated with an epic gif of her dancing; see below), we’re looking back at the roles that got her the accolades. Think of it as a pre-ceremony binge list!

via Giphy

(We’re just as excited as you, Meryl!)

1979: The Deer Hunter »

- Maria Yagoda

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Robert De Niro Writes Meryl Streep a Letter in Support of Her Golden Globes Speech

11 January 2017 12:06 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Robert De Niro is the latest celebrity to voice his support for Meryl Streep following her anti-Donald Trump acceptance speech she gave at the 2017 Golden Globes on Sunday.

In a letter, obtained by People, written by De Niro to his longtime friend, the actor writes that “what she said was great” and “needed to be said.”

“I have so much respect for you that you did it while the world was celebrating your achievements,” De Niro wrote, adding that he feels the same way about punks and bullies. “It is so important that we All speak up.”

The two actors previously worked together on the 1974 film “The Deer Hunter,” “Falling in Love” (1984) and “Marvin’s Room” (1996). They were last seen together at President Obama’s farewell party last Friday.

Read More: Golden Globes: Meryl Streep Calls Out Donald Trump in Cecile B. DeMille Award Acceptance Speech

Upon receiving the Cecile B. »

- Liz Calvario

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Robert De Niro Praises Meryl Streep on Her Golden Globes Speech: ‘It Needed to Be Said, You Said It Beautifully’

9 January 2017 8:47 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Fans and celebrities alike have voiced support for Meryl Streep following her impassioned acceptance speech at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards on Sunday evening, but perhaps no one is prouder than her longtime friend, Robert De Niro.

The 73-year-old actor, who received the Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 2011 show, wrote a heartfelt response to Streep, 67, in a letter, obtained exclusively by People.

“What you said was great. It needed to be said, and you said it beautifully,” De Niro expressed. “I have so much respect for you that you did it while the world was celebrating your achievements. »

- karenmizoguchi

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13 Times Queen Meryl Streep Ruled Over the Golden Globes

8 January 2017 9:00 AM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Meryl Streep may reign over the Oscars, but her real kingdom is the Golden Globes.

Her nomination for Florence Foster Jenkins this year -- as Best Actress in a Comedy or Musical -- marks her 30th in 38 years. She will also receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award, the first person to get that honor in the same year as a nomination in over two decades. (Sophia Loren managed it in 1995.)

Related: Meryl Streep Once Feared Aging in Hollywood Would End Her Career: 'I Thought Each Movie Would Be My Last'

Ahead of tonight's show -- which will no doubt provide at least one more "Yas, Meryl! Yaaas!" moment -- here are 13 reasons why she is and will forever be the Queen of the Golden Globes:

Getty Images

1. She earned her first nomination in 1979 as Best Actress in a Supporting Role for The Deer Hunter. (She lost to Dyan Cannon for Heaven Can Wait.) Meryl was nominated »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2001

1-20 of 23 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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