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2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Thorn in my side

5/10
Author: Ali Catterall from London, England
13 July 2010

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

This is what the Bible has to say on the subject of ravens: "an abomination" (Leviticus 12-21). While according to Isiah (34, 8-11), on the day of the Lord's scorched-earth policy, our feathered pals will fill their blackened bellies with the crispy flesh of the damned. So it's appropriate this much maligned bird, intelligent and music-loving, should feature so heavily in Damien: Omen II as a demonic fixer for teenage Antichrist Damien Thorn (Scott-Taylor).

With hell boy still largely unaware of his destiny, it's the raven who's responsible for much of the murdering, usually by just perching up and belching along to an undulating Jerry Goldsmith choir. That's something those Old Testament prophets neglected to mention; the 'Father of Omens' has a habit of introducing itself with a loud, beak-smacking gut-honk. Not only will it pop your eyes like fried eggs, it'll burp in your face for an aperitif.

Set some 7 years after the events of The Omen, the troubled sequel finds the little devil living the high life with uncle Richard (Holden), Richard's second wife Ann (Grant), and gormless cousin Mark (Donat). Damien's turned out marvellously considering his first adopted father was gunned down while trying to turn him into a colander. Charming, cheeky, insouciant and savvy, he's Holden Caulfield with a helmet haircut. And like most boys on the verge of their thirteenth birthday ("considered by many cultures to have initiation rites"), Damien's going through some startling changes. If only pubic hair and frenzied masturbation were the extent of it.

Shorn of Satanic nannies and hell-hounds, but with the burping raven on constant call, facilitating his rise to badness are a bunch of well-appointed acolytes and corporate thugs, smoothing his entry into the obscenely rich and powerful Thorn Industries, which plans to control - or withhold - food distribution in famine-afflicted territories (good business say some, 'unethical' think others - and horribly familiar we say, from the vantage point of the 21st century). Meanwhile, anybody who gets in Damien's way is slaughtered, and which teen hasn't fantasised about that? Following the trajectory of many future captains of industry, Damien is packed off to military school, where brooding academy sergeant Daniel Neff (Henriksen) informs him of his true nature. "Why?" he howls despairingly. "Why me?" A playful riff on the traumas of puberty, it's the one truly affecting scene because it's so honest. The remainder can be fed to the flames.

If The Omen had a certain vaudevillian grandeur, the sequel feels like a cheap, made-for-TV slasher. More reliable than buses, you can set your watch by the slayings, including a damn good pecking, a deadly plunge under the ice (the most effective set-piece) and death by lift cable, featuring a technician chopped in half width-ways; if the film was aiming to trounce the original's straightforward decapitation, it's just not half as effective in its execution.

It makes one wonder what original director Mike Hodges could have done with it, before fleeing production three weeks into the shoot. As Hodges told the 'Guardian' in 2003, during a row about the design budget the apoplectic producer placed a handgun on the table. "I said, 'Is that loaded?' And he said, 'Yes.' And then we just looked at each other for a bit." Hodges retains a credit (unlike Leo McKern and Ian Hendry, drowned by sand in the first 10 minutes), but the script might have been so different: 'You're a big man, but in you're in bad shape. Now sit down and behave yourself before I summon Baal and Lilith to play conkers with your b****cks."

With the exception of Henriksen, and the beguiling Scott-Taylor, the acting is uniformly stilted, and a quick buck for Holden who was originally pencilled in to play Robert Thorn, but passed as he didn't want to star in a film about the devil. Having seen The Omen clean up, he wasted no time hopping on board for the sequel. More pertinently, the original film was shot with an alternative ending in which Damien died but Alan Ladd Jnr, sniffing bucks, nixed the idea. All of which proves once and for all that the love of sequels is actually the root of all evil.

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2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Good movie

6/10
Author: atinder from United Kingdom
15 January 2010

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I really liked this sequel and some good gory deaths in this movie.

I love scene where the women is attack by the crows one of best scenes in the movie.

which i could not leave out, The others deaths are good too not as gory as the first movie but these deaths scenes did have some great atmosphere.

This not as scary of as good as The 1st Omen movies, This acting in this movie was really good.

It stared of really well and start with it but near the end and the ending for me just felt a little flat for me, i could have had better ending.

It's a really good movie

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2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Predictable, But Good Sequel!

7/10
Author: jbartelone from United States
1 November 2008

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Damien-Omen II picks up with Damien now being sent to live with his Aunt, Uncle, and cousin, in Chicago where he attends military school, and discovers who he is. Johnathon-Scott-Taylor is excellent as 13-year old Damien Thorn. There are some good suspenseful scares along the way, but instead of Rottweiler dogs foreshadowing that something evil is soon to happen, we get some menacing crows.

Injuries and deaths occur in several different places; one to a reporter on a deserted highway, a man who falls through the ice while playing hockey on a frozen lake, a chemical plant, and a hospital doctor who gets "graphically" electrocuted by a suddenly malfunctioning elevator. The predictability is exactly what the audience would expect. Those who get too close to Damian in discovering who he is or anger him in any way usually suffer serious consequences, that most often involve death.

Despite its predictability, the second Omen movie works because of young Johnathon Scott-Taylor's portrayal of Damien. There is a calmness within his character that gradually builds to anger when Damien is provoked or questioned. But Damien also sends a message that he "feels bad" after he has killed or hurt someone, and even worse, because he can't do anything about it. This is where Omen II is the only area where it is better than the original Omen. In the original Omen, Harvey Stephens played Damian amazingly well. However, because of his age, didn't really talk or converse his feelings about why he killed or hurt others. In Omen II, after Damian discovers who he is, he runs through the trees as if trying to escape the horror inside of him. You can feel the emotional impact, "Why Me???!" "Why Me???!" he cries.

Being a teenager gives Damien more groundwork to explore his identity. I would have liked him to further discover his background. Adding additional dimensions to the "why?" element of Damien's personality would have made the film better. Unfortunately, the downside is that after the "Why Me? Why Me?" scene, nothing is answered, and Omen II goes back to Damien killing people who get in his way, without the substance that the movie could have had.

The acting of Johnathon Scott-Taylor is very good, and there are enough suspenseful moments to make Damien-Omen II, better than most sequels of the horror era.

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3 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

An excellent sequel and Jonathan Scott-Taylor was the best Damien

10/10
Author: horrors_R_us from United States
1 June 2007

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I have to say that as fan of horror movies (whether they be new or old), I loved this sequel. I remember watching they original and being very intrigued.

When I recently heard about the sequel, though it's very old, I jumped on the opportunity to watch this. Now, I'm only fourteen, but I just loved this movie (and Jonathan Scott-Taylor). This is definitely a movie that I'm going to record on video to watch again, and again.

On to the movie itself. It was very well acted and had good graphics for it's time. People rag on some of the death scenes, but I have to say that I was impressed with what they had. Maybe Joanne's death was a little silly, but I liked that you could even have a little bit of a laugh.

I thought all of the characters were well acted, and that Jonathan Scott-Taylor was, in my opinion and a decent amount of others, the best Damien to hit the screen. With his eyes and black hair, he really set the feel of being the Antichrist. He was really, really good. The thing that I loved was how Jon made you almost feel bad for Damien. Like, when he killed Mark and then let out a strangled yell. There were even tears. It was especially heart-wrenching that Damien didn't even know he was the Antichrist until half-way through the movie. It was so sad when he screamed at the top of his lungs why it had to be him that was born of the devil and a jackal.

Overall, it was a strong movie and I highly recommend it to people who enjoyed the first film, have an open mind and aren't to hard on things like this. Afterall people, it's just a movie. It's mean't to be fun and enjoyable. Just relax and be a little less "RAWR!", 'kay? ^ ^

~Haley~

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4 out of 6 people found the following review useful:

Thorn in my side

3/10
Author: Ali_Catterall from London, England
3 November 2009

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

This is what the Bible has to say on the subject of ravens: "an abomination" (Leviticus 12-21). While according to Isiah (34, 8-11), on the day of the Lord's scorched-earth policy, our feathered pals will fill their blackened bellies with the crispy flesh of the damned. So it's appropriate this much maligned bird, intelligent and music-loving, should feature so heavily in Damien: Omen II as a demonic fixer for teenage Antichrist Damien Thorn (Scott-Taylor).

With hell boy still largely unaware of his destiny, it's the raven who's responsible for much of the murdering, usually by just perching up and belching along to an undulating Jerry Goldsmith choir. That's something those Old Testament prophets neglected to mention; the 'Father of Omens' has a habit of introducing itself with a loud, beak-smacking gut-honk. Not only will it pop your eyes like fried eggs, it'll burp in your face for an aperitif.

Set some 7 years after the events of The Omen, the troubled sequel finds the little devil living the high life with uncle Richard (Holden), Richard's second wife Ann (Grant), and gormless cousin Mark (Donat). Damien's turned out marvellously considering his first adopted father was gunned down while trying to turn him into a colander. Charming, cheeky, insouciant and savvy, he's Holden Caulfield with a helmet haircut. And like most boys on the verge of their thirteenth birthday ("considered by many cultures to have initiation rites"), Damien's going through some startling changes. If only pubic hair and frenzied masturbation were the extent of it.

Shorn of Satanic nannies and hell-hounds, but with the burping raven on constant call, facilitating his rise to badness are a bunch of well-appointed acolytes and corporate thugs, smoothing his entry into the obscenely rich and powerful Thorn Industries, which plans to control - or withhold - food distribution in famine-afflicted territories (good business say some, 'unethical' think others - and horribly familiar we say, from the vantage point of the 21st century). Meanwhile, anybody who gets in Damien's way is slaughtered, and which teen hasn't fantasised about that?

Following the trajectory of many future captains of industry, Damien is packed off to military school, where brooding academy sergeant Daniel Neff (Henriksen) informs him of his true nature. "Why?" he howls despairingly. "Why me?" A playful riff on the traumas of puberty, it's the one truly affecting scene because it's so honest. The remainder can be fed to the flames.

If The Omen had a certain vaudevillian grandeur, the sequel feels like a cheap, made-for-TV slasher. More reliable than buses, you can set your watch by the slayings, including a damn good pecking, a deadly plunge under the ice (the most effective set-piece) and death by lift cable, featuring a technician chopped in half width-ways; if the film was aiming to trounce the original's straightforward decapitation, it's just not half as effective in its execution.

It makes one wonder what original director Mike Hodges could have done with it, before fleeing production three weeks into the shoot. As Hodges told the 'Guardian' in 2003, during a row about the design budget the apoplectic producer placed a handgun on the table. "I said, 'Is that loaded?' And he said, 'Yes.' And then we just looked at each other for a bit." Hodges retains a credit (unlike Leo McKern and Ian Hendry, drowned by sand in the first 10 minutes), but the script might have been so different: 'You're a big man, but in you're in bad shape. Now sit down and behave yourself before I summon Baal and Lilith to play conkers with your b****cks."

With the exception of Henriksen, and the beguiling Scott-Taylor, the acting is uniformly stilted, and a quick buck for Holden who was originally pencilled in to play Robert Thorn, but passed as he didn't want to star in a film about the devil. Having seen The Omen clean up, he wasted no time hopping on board for the sequel. More pertinently, the original film was shot with an alternative ending in which Damien died but Alan Ladd Jnr, sniffing bucks, nixed the idea. All of which proves once and for all that the love of sequels is actually the root of all evil.

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7 out of 12 people found the following review useful:

A guilty pleasure that will entertain if not enlighten!

6/10
Author: planktonrules from Bradenton, Florida
28 October 2007

While I will be the last one to say that this is a great film or a must-see, it certainly is very entertaining though you might be embarrassed to tell your friends you liked it! That's because it has a silly plot involving the spawn of Satan, occasionally lame and overwrought dialog and a style that just needs to be seen to be believed! But, despite its many shortcomings, this is still a fun little film and not nearly as awful as I'd first suspected. That's because the previous film (THE OMEN) was panned and placed in Harry Medved's "Fifty Worst Films of All Time" book. However, after having seen both films I can definitely say that there are hundreds or perhaps thousands of worse films. In fact, since they entertain and keep your attention, they really aren't bad films but more guilty pleasures!

The film begins with budding teen Damien seeming a lot like a normal boy--not acting at all like the result of a mating with the Devil and a Jackal (wouldn't that make him a son of a .....?). But, slowly, it is revealed that some around the boy are well aware of who he is and are there to serve him without fail. When he is finally told who he is, Damien suffers a short existential crisis before he ultimately gives in to the dark side....no wait, he IS the dark side! Along the way, there are countless exciting to watch and very silly deaths--some orchestrated directly by Damien and his followers and others created by either an unseen force or a nasty crow who seems to be the one behind all the mess. Because the deaths are so bloody and creative, the film reminds me a lot of the low-budget Vincent Price film, THE ABOMINIBLE DOCTOR PHIBES. The dumbest death was the lady who is hit by a truck and the most interesting and disturbing is the man who was sucked under the ice (a nice touch).

While you will be entertained, please do NOT stop to think or reason this out as this is NOT a well-constructed plot. The Biblical passages are wrong--being twisted and misquoted and the film was not meant to be anything other than a silly little exploitation film. While this may offend some religious fundamentalists, if they actually sit still and watch the film, they, too, will probably find the whole thing ludicrous yet oddly entertaining.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

If only most sequels were this good. There's not a minute of the film that isn't watchable.The end result is an effort that'll satisfy fans of Richard Donner's original

10/10
Author: badfeelinganger from United Kingdom
27 September 2014

David Seltzer, who wrote the first film's screenplay, was asked by the producers to write the second. Seltzer refused as he had no interest in writing sequels. Years later, Seltzer commented that had he written the story for the second Omen, he would have set it the day after the first movie, with Damien a child living in The White House. With Seltzer turning down Omen II, producer Harvey Bernhard duly outlined the story himself, and Stanley Mann was hired to write the screenplay.

After Bernhard had finished writing the story outline and was given the green light to start the production, the first person he contacted was Jerry Goldsmith because of the composer's busy schedule. Bernhard also felt that Goldsmith's music for The Omen was the highest point of that movie, and that without Goldsmith's music, the sequel would not be successful. Goldsmith's Omen II score uses similar motifs to his original Omen score, but for the most part, Goldsmith avoided re-using the same musical cues. In fact, the first movie's famous "Ave Satani" theme is used only partially, just before the closing credits begin. Goldsmith composed a largely different main title theme for Omen II, albeit one that utilises Latin phrases as "Ave Satani" had done. Goldsmith's Omen II score allows eerie choral effects and unusual electronic sound designs to take precedence over the piano and Gothic chanting.

Richard Donner, director of the first Omen movie, was not available to direct the second, as he was busy working on Superman. British film director Mike Hodges was hired to helm the movie. During production, the producers believed that Hodges' methods were too slow, and so they fired him and replaced him with Don Taylor, who had a reputation for finishing films on time and under budget. However, the few scenes Hodges directed (some of the footage at the factory and at the military academy, all of the early archaeology scenes, and the dinner where Aunt Marion shows her concern about Damien) remained in the completed film, for which Hodges retains a story credit. In recent interviews, Hodges has commented sanguinely on his experiences working on Omen II.

Academy Award-winning veteran actor William Holden was the original choice to star as Robert Thorn in the first Omen, but turned it down as he did not want to star in a picture about the devil. Gregory Peck was selected as his replacement. The Omen went on to become a huge hit and Holden made sure he did not turn down the part of protagonist Richard Thorn in the sequel. Lee Grant, another Oscar-winner, was a fan of the first Omen and accepted enthusiastically the role of female protagonist-later-turncoat Ann Thorn.

Ray Berwick (1914–1990) trained and handled the crows used for several scenes in the film. Live birds and a crow-puppet were used for the attack on photojournalist Joan Hart. Berwick also trained the avian actors in Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds (1963).

This more-than-competent sequel to The Omen raises some interesting questions about the nature of free will can the Antichrist deny his birthright? Jerry Goldsmith who won an Oscar for his work on the first film in the series contributes another marvellously foreboding score. As the teenage Damien, Jonathan Scott-Taylor works wonders with the role

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

A very good continuation of the Omen story

8/10
Author: Red-Barracuda from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
30 January 2014

This entertaining movie is a pretty good example of big budget mainstream horror. It is, of course, a sequel to The Omen; a film that had tapped into the 70's thirst for religious themed horror and had went on to be a big smash hit. Damien: Omen II, perhaps unsurprisingly, doesn't have the originality of that first film but it maintains the story very well in my opinion. It's the one film in the franchise where the action has moved from the UK to the USA. It focuses on the now 13 year old antichrist Damien Thorn, who is being schooled in a military academy. It's also the part where he becomes aware of who he really is.

In many ways its story arc follows quite close to the original template but with the addition of more frequent, inventive and gory death scenes involving the poor unfortunates who get too close to the truth. In effect, this movie plays out like a series of elaborate set-pieces strung together over a fairly basic plot-line. This isn't such a terrible thing though because these macabre moments are all really executed very well. In particular are three notable death sequences – on a deserted road a woman is attacked by a raven who pecks her eyes out, she is then finished off by being hit full force by a truck; a man is cut in half by a falling elevator cable; during a game of hockey on a frozen lake, the ice breaks and a man falls under resulting in the disturbing scenario where we see him helplessly floating just below the ice. These set-pieces, along with several others, constitute the highlight of the movie and they are all well-conceived and give the film its definite draw. Because the film is neither a beginning, nor an end to the story it allows this instalment to simply focus its attention on the macabre material in between and it's really not a bad thing.

There are other interesting changes though, such as the use of the raven as the creature of the devil, I thought it was a better choice than the Rottweiler from the first movie and it was very well integrated into the story. The acting too is more than decent with the likes of William Holden basically taking on the role Gregory Peck filled in the first movie, while Jonathan Scott-Taylor looks right as Damien, his thin features can look cold and ominous but he is never cartoonishly evil, which was a good thing. He has one particularly memorable and original scene too where he knows the answer to every single question his history teacher throws at him. It's one of the less gruesome more subtly sinister moments that really stands out. Some things remain the same though and once again there is a really good score from Jerry Goldsmith. It's very dramatic with that ominous choir sound that is just perfect for this subject matter.

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

The Omen II is the story of Damien Thorn 7 years after his father died trying to kill him.

10/10
Author: mdparalegal1 from United States
5 November 2013

This is actually my favorite installment in the Omen trilogy, though the first, starring Gregory Peck, was excellent as well. The Omen II- Damien, like its predecessor, scores a perfect 10 for casting. All of the actors are believable in their roles with newcomer Jonathan Scott Taylor (teenaged Damien) giving a particularly outstanding effort. The musical score was haunting and the plot very well done. The story unfolds seven years after Damien comes to live with his father's brother. It is here, he discovers and comes to terms with who he is and his destiny with all the angst, emotional turmoil and eventual acceptance the audience could imagine themselves facing. The plot flows easily, the story line makes sense and there are no loose ends left hanging. For a sequel, this one works and works well. Following a wildly successful original, The Omen, was a risky under taking. One usually expects a let down. You will not find one in The Omen II. In fact, so rare is it for a sequel to succeed as powerfully as this one, I can only think of one time where it happened. The Godfather II was as brilliant as The Godfather. That is how I feel about this movie. Enjoy!

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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Not as good as the original

6/10
Author: FilmFreak94 from United States
28 May 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Damien: Omen 2 follows the story of young Damien who is now thirteen years old and still unaware of his unholy destiny. After the events of The Omen, Damien has moved in with his uncle Richard(who owns his own museum) and his aunt Ann. Damien is good friends with his cousin Mark and the two of them are like brothers. Only great Aunt Marion seems to think there is something wrong with Damien and asks Richard to separate the two boys at the risk of writing them out of her will. That same night Marion suspiciously dies of a heart attack when a crow appears outside her window. Strange things begin to occur around Damien again as a journalist tries to warn Mr. Thorn of the events, but is killed in a gruesome death. As the death toll continues to rise, agents of Satan have begun to appear again in Damien's life and they begin to watch over him as he is about to discover his true potential.

This film is not as good as the original Omen. It does have a few creative death scenes and the music by Jerry Goldsmith is still top notch, but the story seems more like a repeat of the first story. We already know Damien is the Antichrist, so when Richard finally discovers all the suspense is gone. If you liked the first film and would like to continue the series, then you should see the film. But I believe only fans of the first film will like this movie and even then most of them won't hold it in the high regards of the original Omen. Damien: Omen 2 is by no means a bad film, but it isn't a great film either. Overall, I give it a 6.5 out of 10 leaning towards a 6.

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