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Blue Fin (1978) Poster

(1978)

Trivia

Hardy Krüger said that he had only ever caught one fish in his life at the time of being cast in this film. It was a Tuna, the type of fish that the fishermen catch professionally in the movie.
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The vessel "Velebit" was used for the clipper "Blue Fin". Other boats which appeared in the film included :"Hannibal"; "Bronwyn" (playing "Dog Star"); "Southern Condor"; "Origin:; "Anna Marguerite" and many others.
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Many dummy plastic tuna fish made of polyurethane foam were used instead of real fish as the tuna run season had finished for the period of filming.
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Director Bruce Beresford filmed additional footage after principal photography had ended where editor Rod Adamson, mindful of the post-production problems he had dealt with on the South Australian Film Corporation (SAFC)'s _Sunday Too Far Away_, said that the film would not cut together. Producer 'Matt Carroll' recruited Beresford who had a three picture deal with the SAFC at the time and had recently completed Money Movers (1978) for them. Beresford re-shot the major cabin sequence at the Norwood Studios of the SAFC. A double was used for Hardy Krüger who had gone back home to Germany. It did not matter as Kruger's character Bill Pascoe lies injured on the 'Blue Fin' boat's cabin floor throughout this sequence.
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Second of two leading roles that then child actor Greg Rowe made for the South Australian Film Corporation (SAFC). The first was Storm Boy (1976). Both these film's involved wild weather as did The Last Wave (1977), another SAFC film which Rowe appeared in in a smaller role. Rowe also appeared in a small role in the SAFC's Freedom (1982).
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The meaning and relevance of this film's title is that it refers to the name of tuna fishing boat 'Blue Fin' which features prominently in the movie.
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Many of the production personnel who worked on this film also worked on Storm Boy (1976), the South Australian Film Corporation's earlier production of another novel by Colin Thiele. This included Scott Hicks, actor Greg Rowe, producer Matt Carroll, screenwriter Sonia Borg, DOP Geoff Burton, composer Michael Carlos, and Art Director David Copping as well as a number of other technical crew personnel.
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This film was made and released about nine years after author Colin Thiele's source novel 'Blue Fin' was first published in 1969.
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Actor Hardy Krüger was about fifty years old when he appeared in this film.
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800 boys were interviewed by the South Australian Film Corporation (SAFC) to play the lead role of Snook. Of these, twenty-five were screen tested. The role ended up going to then child actor Greg Rowe who had about two years earlier headlined the SAFC's earlier critically acclaimed family film Storm Boy (1976).
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About three hundred of the South Australian fishing village town of Streaky Bay's 1200 residents appeared as extras in this movie.
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Hardy Krüger received top / first billing, Greg Rowe received second billing, Liddy Clark received third billing, John Jarratt received fourth billing.
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Hardy Krüger once said of being cast in this film: "The three most important things about a movie are the script, the script, and the script. They chased me to the wilds of Canada to show me this script. I took it home and read it overnight, and decided I wanted to do it. I had seen an Australian film at a Western film festival at Cannes. My film 'Potato Fritz' [Montana Trap (1976)] was in it and I was hoping it would win. But the film that won was Mad Dog Morgan (1976). That made me aware that Australia could make good films. Then when they showed me Storm Boy (1976) in Los Angeles that clinched it".
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Second filmed adaptation of a Colin Thiele novel by the South Australian Film Corporation. The first was Storm Boy (1976), the third was The Fire in the Stone (1984) and the fourth was Sun on the Stubble (1996).
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Hardy Krüger once said of the weather during production shooting: "We have been able to rely on the weather - rely on it to change every hour! We have had glorious weather, bad weather, hot weather, cold weather - You name it, we've had it! But we have managed. It's been hard work for us all, but it's been fun".
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