The staff of a struggling radio station have a chance at success after the new programming director changes the format to rock music

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4   3   2   1  
1982   1981   1980   1979   1978  
Nominated for 3 Golden Globes. Another 2 wins & 13 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
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 Andy Travis (90 episodes, 1978-1982)
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 Arthur 'Big Guy' Carlson / ... (90 episodes, 1978-1982)
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 Jennifer Marlowe (89 episodes, 1978-1982)
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 Dr. Johnny Fever (90 episodes, 1978-1982)
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 Les Nessman / ... (89 episodes, 1978-1982)
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 Herb Tarlek (89 episodes, 1978-1982)
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 Venus Flytrap (87 episodes, 1978-1982)
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 Bailey Quarters (86 episodes, 1978-1982)
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Storyline

A hip, young program director pumps new life into a failing AM radio station, WKRP of Cincinatti, by changing format from Big Band to Hard Rock/Punk and bringing in two hot disc jockeys, over the protest of the owner... and some of the employees. Written by LA-Lawyer

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Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

TV-PG

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

18 September 1978 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Halløj i æteren  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

,  »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(90 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Johnny Fever was fired from a previous job because he said the word "booger" on the air. When Andy changed the station's format in the middle of Johnny's show, he showed his joy by uttering the previously banned word. See more »

Quotes

Jennifer Marlowe: Mr. Craven I would like to ask you a question about the phone company.
Wayne Craven: Well that's what I'm here for, fire away.
Jennifer Marlowe: You know the phone company won't give you a specific time when they'll come to install your phone. You have to wait all day long. Like most people, I work and can't take the whole day off.
Wayne Craven: Uh-Hunh.
Jennifer Marlowe: So Saturday is the only day I'll be here. But because so many other people have the same problem, you can wait up to two, three weeks or more for service.
Wayne Craven: That's correct.
Jennifer Marlowe: Could you tell me...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

The lyrics for the closing credits consist of gibberish words. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Dead Like Me: Life After Death (2009) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A breath of fresh air
30 May 2003 | by (California) – See all my reviews

Amid the cookie-cutter, assembly-line sitcoms of the late '70s and early '80s, "WKRP in Cincinnati" stood out like a breath of fresh air. It had all the qualities necessary for a classic comedy: the show was character-driven, not dependent on a never-ending stream of glib and not-so-glib one-liners (and, thank God, no "cute" kids); the writing was sharp, clever, and at times absolutely brilliant; the ensemble cast worked together like a well-oiled machine, with each character having its own distinctive--and, unusual for television, three-dimensional--qualities, both good and not so good; and in addition to wringing laughs out of everyday situations, it wasn't afraid to tackle more serious subjects, either, such as parental responsibility, censorship, shady business practices in the industry, drug use and, of course, one of the most barbaric problems to have confronted America in this century: the practice of using live turkeys in promotional campaigns ("As God is my witness, I thought they could fly!").

Many episodes stand out, of course, the main one probably being the above-mentioned turkey extravaganza, but there were others that were equally as memorable: the staff's discomfort at being sponsored by a chain of funeral homes and having to come up with a catchy "slogan" for them; the inspired casting of Bert Parks as Herb Tarlek's charming, but even more obnoxious, father; Johnny Fever's "selling out" by hosting a cheesy TV dance show; Les Nessman's being barred from sports locker rooms because of a false rumor spread around that he was gay; a dark secret from Venus Flytrap's past finally catching up with him; and a host of other brilliant episodes dealing with serious and not-so-serious issues.

This is one of the class acts of sitcomdom, and ranks up there with "Taxi", "Mary Tyler Moore," "Cheers" and "Seinfeld" as among the finest sitcoms ever made. Unfortunately, unlike the aforementioned shows, "WKRP" never really got the respect it so richly deserved. But at least we can keep enjoying it on reruns. Thank God for small favors.


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