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(1978–1979)

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Indie Spotlight

  • DailyDead
We’re back with another edition of the Indie Spotlight, highlighting recent independent horror news sent our way. Today’s feature includes details on The ABCs of Death 2 contest, a new clip from Muirhouse, a Q&A with Lauren Lakis from Horror House, and much more:

The ABCs of Death 2 Contest Details: “We’re in the midst of our contest to find the 26th Director for ABCs Of Death 2. The contest runs until Halloween, and we’re hoping to secure many, many more submissions by then. We’re looking for new, inventive content!”

For more information, or to learn how to participate in the ABCs of Death 2 contest to be the 26th director, visit: http://26th.abcsofdeathpart2.com/

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New Clip from Muirhouse: “In 2007 Phillip Muirhouse began a promotional book tour on supernatural phenomena. As a publicity stunt he was to be filmed inside a local tourist trap, The Monte Cristo Homestead,
See full article at DailyDead »

R.I.P. T.S. Cook

  • Deadline TV
R.I.P. T.S. Cook
Screenwriter and producer T.S. Cook, best known for penning the 1979 thriller The China Syndrome died Saturday after battling cancer. He was 65. Cook, a Cleveland, Ohio native, received Oscar, BAFTA and Golden Globe nominations for Best Screenplay for The China Syndrome, an honor he shared with co-writers Mike Gray and James Bridges. Cook was a decades-long active member of the Writers Guild of America and a “tenacious advocate” for writers, his longtime manager Jeff Aghassi tells Deadline. Cook was honored by the WGA in 1980 for The China Syndrome. He also received an Emmy nomination for penning The Tuskegee Airmen (1995) and won a second Writers Guild award for Nightbreaker in 1989. His other TV credits include Project U.F.O., Baretta, The Paper Chase, Airwolf, Texas Justice and most recently The Hive and NYC: Tornado Terror, which both aired on Syfy in 2008.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Rest in Peace: Kenneth Mars

Sadly on this day of love and warmth, we're heartbroken to report that the world as we know it just became a lot less funny. Another Hollywood great has passed on.

According to Yahoo! News long-time Mel Brooks collaborator, actor Kenneth Mars, whom genre fans will no doubt remember for his glorious role as an earnest police inspector with a malfunctioning artificial arm in Young Frankenstein, died on Saturday of pancreatic cancer at his home in Grenada Hills. He was 75.

Though Mars only dabbled in our genre a single time theatrically, he could also be found in TV shows like the new "Twilight Zone", "The Ghost & Mrs. Muir", and "Project U.F.O.".

At this time we here at Dread Central would like to offer our sincerest of condolences to Kenneth's friends, family, and constituents. Thanks for all the memories and laughs. You will be sorely missed.

- Uncle Creepy

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See full article at Dread Central »

Veteran Character Actress Frances Reid is Dead

Actress Frances Reid was best known for her starring role as Alice Horton in the daytime soap opera Days of Our Lives for the past 45 years. She was also featured as Emily Hamilton, the older wife of Rock Hudson’s character in John Frankenheimer’s 1966 film Seconds before he was rejuvenated as a much younger man, and was the wife of David Wayne’s scientist character in the 1971 science fiction classic The Andromeda Strain.

Reid was born in Wichita Falls on December 9, 1914, and was raised in Berkeley, California. She studied acting at the Pasadena Community Playhouse, and began her career on the Broadway stage in the late 1930s. She performed in numerous stage productions, and was appearing on television by the late 1940s. She was seen in episodes of Lights Out, Danger, the 1959 Hallmark Hall of Fame adaptation of Berkeley Square, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, The F.B.I.,
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

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