The cases of former car thief-turned-criminal attorney Martin "Kaz" Kazinsky.
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1  
1979   1978  
Won 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
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 Martin 'Kaz' Kazinsky 23 episodes, 1978-1979
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 Samuel Bennett 23 episodes, 1978-1979
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 Peter Colcourt 23 episodes, 1978-1979
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Linda Carlson ...
 Katie McKenna 22 episodes, 1978-1979
Gloria LeRoy ...
 Mary Parnell 22 episodes, 1978-1979
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 D.A. Frank Revko 22 episodes, 1978-1979
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Storyline

While brash Martin Kazinsky was serving a six-year prison sentence for stealing cars, he decided to go straight and study law. Upon his release, he received a law degree, passed the bar, and joined a prestigious law firm headed by wise senior partner Samuel Bennett. "Kaz" was a somewhat abrasive and often hot-headed lawyer, but no one knew more about defending an underdog than he, and Kaz often went way beyond the call of duty to keep his clients out of jail. Katie was a reporter whom Kaz often dated. Written by Marty McKee <mmckee@soltec.net>

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Genres:

Crime | Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

14 April 1978 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Kaz & Co  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(22 episodes)

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Connections

Referenced in Archer: Midnight Ron (2013) See more »

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User Reviews

Jaw jaw, and law law.
23 August 2002 | by See all my reviews

I remember this series very well.

Goofy teethed Ron Liebman starred as a convict who while in prison, for what I don't remember, studies law. When he is released he becomes a fully fledged legal-eagle, and sets about championing the causes of the down at heel. All very very believable stuff indeed. It was almost like a naughty version of Petrocelli, but without the unfinished house. It is especially memorable to me because of it's intro sequence, which featured animated still photos, which seemed to be the in thing with title sequences back in the '70s; ie, Baretta, Police Woman etc.


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