The Squeeze (1977) - News Poster

(1977)

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Fat City

John Huston sets the bar for director-driven quality filmmaking of the early 1970s. Stacy Keach is a punchy boxing bum who teams up with the ambitious newcomer Jeff Bridges; the glowing discovery is the amazing Susan Tyrell, film history's most convincingly caustic floozy-alcoholic, bar none. Her voice can peel paint, but we love her dearly. Fat City Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1972 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date September 8, 2015 / available through the Twilight Time Movies / 20.95 Starring Stacy Keach, Jeff Bridges, Susan Tyrrell, Candy Clark, Nicholas Colasanto, Art Aragon, Curtis Cokes, Sixto Rodriguez Cinematography Conrad L. Hall Production Designer Richard Sylbert Film Editor Walter Thompson Original Music Kris Kristofferson, Marvin Hamlisch (supervisor) Written by Leonard Gardner from his novel <Produced by John Huston, Ray Stark Directed by John Huston

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

This rewarding show is a fine opportunity to catch up on two great talents, John Huston and Stacy Keach.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Lead Actors: The Overlooked and Underrated

  • SoundOnSight
This article is dedicated to Andrew Copp: filmmaker, film writer, artist and close friend who passed away on January 19, 2013. You are loved and missed, brother.

****

Looking at the Best Actor Academy Award nominations for the film year 2012, the one miss that clearly cries out for more attention is Liam Neeson’s powerful performance in Joe Carnahan’s excellent survival film The Grey, easily one of the best roles of Neeson’s career.

In Neeson’s case, his lack of a nomination was a case of neglect similar to the Albert Brooks snub in the Best Supporting Actor category for the film year 2011 for Drive(Nicolas Winding Refn, USA).

Along with negligence, other factors commonly prevent outstanding lead acting performances from getting the kind of critical attention they deserve. Sometimes it’s that the performance is in a film not considered “Oscar material” or even worthy of any substantial critical attention.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

DVD Review: Pusher

Pusher

Review by Andrew McArthur

Stars: Richard Coyle, Agyness Deyn , Zlatko Buric, Paul Kaye, Bronson Webb, Mem Ferda, Neil Maskell | Written by Matthew Read | Directed by Luis Prieto

Luis Prieto’s British made update of Nicolas Winding Refn’s 1996 film, Pusher, received its world premiere at last year’s Edinburgh International Film Festival, and now the gripping, adrenaline fuelled ride, which is by far one of the most exciting British crime thrillers in recent years comes to DVD and Blu-ray.

Frank (Richard Coyle) may just be London’s most unlucky drug dealer. After a deal goes horrendously wrong, he finds himself owing a ruthless Serbian crime boss over £55,000. In a desperate search for money, Frank soon finds his life spiralling out of control and relationships with those around him beginning to crumble.

It is hard to deviate from certain traditional elements in this genre, for example, risky deals and unrelenting
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Eiff 2012 Review: Luis Prieto’s Pusher

Pusher

Review by Andrew McArthur of The People’s Movies

Stars: Richard Coyle, Agyness Deyn , Zlatko Buric, Paul Kaye, Bronson Webb, Mem Ferda, Neil Maskell | Written by Matthew Read | Directed by Luis Prieto

Luis Prieto’s British made update of Nicolas Winding Refn’s 1996 film, Pusher, receives its world premiere at this year’s Edinburgh International Film Festival. The Spanish director has presented us with a gripping, adrenaline fuelled ride, which is by far one of the most exciting British crime thrillers in recent years.

Frank (Richard Coyle) may just be London’s most unlucky drug dealer. After a deal goes horrendously wrong, he finds himself owing a ruthless Serbian crime boss over £55,000. In a desperate search for money, Frank soon finds his life spiralling out of control and relationships with those around him beginning to crumble.

It is hard to deviate from certain traditional elements in this genre, for example,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

The Forgotten: The Filth

  • MUBI
Film: noun

a thin layer of something on a surface

i.e. a film of dust/oil/grease, a film of smoke

dimness or morbid growth affecting the eyes

Michael Apted, a respected director of features, documentaries, and TV plays, directed The Squeeze in 1977 from a screenplay by Leon Griffiths, who had just scripted The Grissom Gang for Robert Aldrich. Both films deal with kidnappings and are unremittingly squalid and horrible. Moreover, both have an interesting transatlantic quality: the Aldrich film is adapted from No Orchids for Miss Blandish, a near-pornographic rip-off of Falkner's Sanctuary, and an American-set thriller by an author who had never set foot in the States, relying instead on a dictionary of American slang and a firm grounding in pulp fiction. (The original British adaptation has just come out on DVD). The Squeeze is much more wholeheartedly British, capturing the grunginess of the seventies just as I remember it,
See full article at MUBI »

Two U.S. Underground Films Debut At 2010 Edinburgh International Film Festival

Two highly-anticipated second feature films from U.S. underground filmmakers will be making their World Premieres all the way over at the 64th annual Edinburgh International Film Festival, which will run for twelve days on June 16-27. The films are Rona Mark’s The Crab and Zach Clark’s Vacation!.

The Crab, which screens on June 21, is the touching story of a verbally abusive man born with two enormous, mutant-like hands; while Vacation!, which screens on June 20, tracks four urban gals let loose in a sunny seaside resort down South.

Both Mark and Clark previously screened their debut features at Eiff. Mark’s Strange Girls screened there in 2008 and Clark’s Modern Love Is Automatic screened in 2009. Both films also ended up as runners-up in Bad Lit’s annual Movie of the Year award, again Strange Girls in 2008 and Modern Love in 2009. Sadly, these two masterpieces are still unavailable on
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

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