The Spy Who Loved Me
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13 items from 2016


Who should direct / star in the next Bond?

28 May 2016 6:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

In not surprising news, Sam Mendes is moving on from the 007 franchise after Skyfall (2012) and Spectre (2015). Daniel Craig is probably moving on, too, but rumors about who will replace him are, as ever, premature. The names floating about this time are Idris Elba and Tom Hiddleston (wishful fan thinking, maybe, since the internet has been suggesting these two names forever) and 30 year old Jamie Bell which is an interesting idea and probably not a bad one. If chosen he'd be the youngest Bond since Sean Connery (who was 30 when he was cast for Dr. No (1962) though most subsequent Bonds have been around 40 when they started. Plus Bell is super charismatic but underused in cinema.

Though Bond films are largely regarded as producer driven and leading actor focused pictures, rather than directorial feats, the man in the chair is important. In the past the franchise has generally relied on mid level directors rather than auteurs, »

- NATHANIEL R

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Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: A.O. Scott, Orson Welles, Owen Gleiberman, Humphrey Bogart, and More

5 May 2016 1:07 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Part of the fun in rounding up recent books about (or connected to) cinema is the sheer diversity of releases. This latest collection features a dive into this history of Hollywood legends, lots more Force Awakens, compelling reads from two fascinating critics, texts highlighting the art of Batman v. Superman and The Little Prince, and more. Plus, if you’ve been coveting Constable Zuvio mentions, you’re finally in luck.

Movie Freak: My Life Watching Movies by Owen Gleiberman (Hachette Books)

My favorite book of 2016 thus far has arrived, and it’s Movie Freak by former Entertainment Weekly critic Owen Gleiberman. For many a nineties teen, EW was something of a pop culture bible, and Gleiberman’s incisive writing was a key reason. In Movie Freak, his unguardedly personal memoir, he talks of films loved (Blue Velvet, Manhunter), friendships dashed (with the likes of Oliver Stone and Pauline Kael), and »

- Christopher Schobert

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Christopher Nolan and his impact on comic book movies

24 April 2016 4:56 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Comic book movies are getting darker and grittier in some quarters. That's down to Christopher Nolan, right? Well, not quite...

If someone were to say the words 'Nolanisation of comic book movies' to you, it might conjur up images incredibly serious, laughter-free movies with a dark visual palette. The word 'gritty' would be used. Furthermore, Christopher Nolan has arguably had as big an impact on comic book movies as anyone over the last decade, and many are keen to follow in his path. Thus, goes the theory, comic book movies - and blockbusters in general - are favouring dark and gritty.

And yet, on rewatching The Dark Knight trilogy, it becomes immediately apparent that Christopher Nolan's own work doesn't entirely align with this.

My own personal frame of reference is, as ever, Doctor Who. In the 1980s, two stories – Earthshock and The Caves Of Androzani – became »

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Guy Hamilton Dead At Age 93; Directed Four James Bond Films And "Battle Of Britain".

21 April 2016 6:51 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Guy Hamilton and Roger Moore on the set of "The Man With the Golden Gun" in Thailand, 1974.

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the loss of director Guy Hamilton, who has passed away at age 93. Guy was an old friend and supporter of our magazine and a wonderful talent and raconteur. Hamilton, though British by birth, spent much of his life in France. After WWII, he entered the film industry in England and served as assistant director to Sir Carol Reed, working on the classic film "The Third Man". He also served as Ad on John Huston's "The African Queen". Gradually, he moved up the ladder to director and helmed such films as "An Inspector Calls", "The Colditz Story" and "The Devil's Disciple", the latter starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas and Laurence Olivier. In 1964 Hamilton was hired to direct the third James Bond film "Goldfinger" and made cinema history. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Remembering Garry Shandling, Patty Duke and Other Reel-Important People We Lost in March

5 April 2016 4:30 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Sir Ken Adam (1921-2016) - Production Designer. He won Oscars for his work on Barry Lyndon and The Madness of King George and was nominated for Around the World in Eighty DaysThe Spy Who Loved Me and Addams Family Values. He also worked on Dr. Strangelove, Ben-Hur, In & Out, Chitty Chitty Bang BangSleuth and the other James Bond movies GoldfingerThunderballYou Only Live TwiceDr. No, Diamonds Are...

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- Christopher Campbell

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Top 3 Sharks in Cinema History

16 March 2016 1:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Ahead of Sinema: An Interactive Bad Movie Experience 2: An evening of games, live music and discussion around the film ‘Jurassic Shark’ on April 2nd at the Deptford Cinema, John and Joel from the Sinema Podcast look at the top three Sharks in motion picture history…

Since The Edison Company successfully demonstrated the Kinetoscope in 1891 people have been desperately trying to accurately represent the majesty of sharks on the silver screen. Although early attempts were crude and frankly dangerous, modern filmmaking techniques have ensured that we can enjoy sharks of all shapes and sizes with our overpriced popcorn and Tango ice-blasts.

After months of considerable research Sinema has compiled an irrefutable list of the top three sharks in cinema.

3. Mr. Shark – Toy Story 1 & 2

Mr Shark is a complex character whose back-story is delicately built up through the narrative of Toy Story 1 & 2 but unfortunately we don’t ever get to see »

- Luke Owen

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Sir Ken Adam, Oscar-winning Production Designer, Dead At Age 95

11 March 2016 9:31 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the loss of Sir Ken Adam, the ingenious, Oscar-winning production designer who has passed away at age 95. Adam's work helped redefine films in terms of the elaborate and creative designs he invented, particularly for the James Bond franchise. Adam's work on the first 007 film, "Dr. No" in 1962 was deemed to be nothing less than remarkable, considering that the entire film was shot on a relatively low budget of just over $1 million. His exotic designs so impressed Stanley Kubrick that he hired Adam as production designer on his 1964 classic "Dr. Strangelove." For that film, Adam created the now legendary "War Room" set which many people believe actually exists at the Pentagon. In fact when Ronald Reagan was inaugurated as President in 1981 he asked to see the War Room, only to be told that it was a fictional creation. Reagan acknowledged that he had been intrigued »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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James Bond, 'Dr. Strangelove' designer Sir Ken Adam dies aged 95

11 March 2016 3:14 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Two-time Oscar winner Adam was the first production designer to receive a knighthood.

Sir Ken Adam, the two-time Oscar winning production designer known for his work on James Bond films of the 1960s and 70s, died Thursday [10 March] at his home in London.

In addition to his work on Bond films including Goldfinger, The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, Adam was highly regarded for his iconic production design in Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove. Director Steven Spielberg described the film’s ‘War Room’ as the best film set ever built.

He was also known for designing the original car for 1968 musical Chitty Chitty Bang Bang [pictured below].

Adam won his first Oscar in 1976 for his work on Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon, and his second in 1995 for Nicholas Hytner’s The Madness Of King George. He received three additional nominations for Around The World In 80 Days, The Spy Who Loved Me, and Addams Family Values.

Adam was born »

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Ken Adam, Designer of James Bond Supervillain Lairs, Dies at 95

10 March 2016 1:37 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Five-time Oscar nominee and two-time winner Ken Adam, a production designer best known for his work on the James Bond films of the 1960s and 1970s and on “Dr. Strangelove,” died Thursday in London, according to the BBC. He was 95.

Adam created the sprawling, futuristic lairs of the supervillains who populated the Bond films starting with Dr. No’s secret island complex in the first 007 film in 1962. He worked on all the Bond films that starred Sean Connery through 1972’s “Diamonds Are Forever,” as well as on “The Spy Who Loved Me” (for which he received an Oscar nomination) and “Moonraker,” both starring Roger Moore.

For Stanley Kubrick’s “Dr. Strangelove,” he designed the famous war room. He was offered the production designer gig on Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” but turned it down.

Adam worked on other thrillers, including “The Ipcress File” and sequel “Funeral in Berlin,” but »

- Carmel Dagan

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Bond, Kubrick Designer Ken Adam Has Died

10 March 2016 1:26 PM, PST | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Oscar winning production designer Ken Adam died today in London at the age of 95 according to The BBC.

Adam is most famous for creating the iconic and sprawling lairs of the supervillains who populated the Sean Connery and Roger Moore-era James Bond films. His designs included the Crab Key complex in "Dr. No," the Fort Knox interiors on "Goldfinger," the volcano lair of "You Only Live Twice," Stromberg's supertanker and Atlantis sets in "The Spy Who Loved Me," and Drax's space station in "Moonraker". He also did the production design on "Thunderball" and "Diamonds Are Forever".

Adams' work extended well beyond the Bond franchise though, such as two films in the anti-Bond Harry Palmer film series with Michael Caine - "The Ipcress File" and "Funeral in Berlin". He was a favorite of Stanley Kubrick following his design of the famous war room for "Dr. Strangelove". He was offered "2001" but turned it down, »

- Garth Franklin

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Film Nerd 2.0: How does 'cool' get handed down from one generation to the next?

2 March 2016 1:30 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Later this month, my father will be in La, and Toshi is already asking me what movie he's going to get to watch with Grandaddy this time. As we covered in an earlier Film Nerd 2.0, my dad shared some John Wayne films with Toshi and Allen during a vacation to Big Bear a few years ago, and they both connect John Wayne to my father now, exactly the same way I did when I was their age. Today, my father turns 76 years old, and one of the things that I love about our relationship was the way he defined certain icons of cool for me because I saw what they meant to him. Steve McQueen, for example. I can't think of McQueen without thinking of my dad. On more than one occasion, I was able to get him to stop cold in his tracks simply by flipping past a cable »

- Drew McWeeny

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James Bond 007: revisiting Spectre

24 January 2016 6:14 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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We complete our series looking back at the James Bond movies, with a detailed look at Spectre, starring Daniel Craig...

This article contains big spoilers for Spectre and Star Trek Into Darkness.

Daniel Craig’s fourth or Roger Moore’s eighth? The former of course but you get the point. The almost-realistic stylings of early Craig have given way to the full blown pantomime excess of mid-Moore (or late Connery, in fairness). Desert lairs, endless car chases, free-wheelin’ helicopters and indestructible airplanes are all very much back in vogue. The result is a largely enjoyable, extremely silly film which attempts to tie previous Craig outings together at the expense of consistency and logic. There isn’t a plot: more a succession of scenes stitched together. And it still can’t manage a decent finale! Fun but ultimately frivolous. Now who does that remind me of?

The Villain: It’s Blofeld! »

- simonbrew

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London Spy: BBC wants second series, creator sceptical

11 January 2016 12:59 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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The BBC has asked London Spy creator Tom Rob Smith for more episodes, but he’s not sure we need them…

This article contains vague spoilers for London Spy series 1.

It’s rare that you hear about a TV writer/series creator not wanting a second series, but that’s exactly what seems to be happening with London Spy’s Tom Rob Smith.

“The BBC have asked [for a second series] and my instinct is that it probably shouldn’t continue,” he told The Guardian. “If you’ve lost the two central relationships, who would you be spinning Danny through? I preferred Charlotte and Ben going head to head, I don’t know whether they’d have the same spark as friends.”

“I don’t have any desire to explore the real-world spy consequences of what was going on,” Mr Smith continued. “It was a relationship drama refracted through the prism of the spy genre. »

- rleane

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2001 | 1970

13 items from 2016


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