IMDb > Saturday Night Fever (1977)
Saturday Night Fever
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Saturday Night Fever (1977) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.8/10   47,581 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Nik Cohn (story)
Norman Wexler (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for Saturday Night Fever on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
16 December 1977 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Where do you go when the record is over... See more »
Plot:
A Brooklyn teenager feels his only chance to succeed is as the king of the disco floor. His carefree youth and weekend dancing help him to forget the reality of his bleak life. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 7 wins & 8 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Beautifully Defines An Era On The Backdrop Of A Realistic Class Study and Dynamic Music See more (202 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

John Travolta ... Tony Manero

Karen Lynn Gorney ... Stephanie
Barry Miller ... Bobby C.
Joseph Cali ... Joey

Paul Pape ... Double J.

Donna Pescow ... Annette
Bruce Ornstein ... Gus
Julie Bovasso ... Flo
Martin Shakar ... Frank Jr.

Sam Coppola ... Dan Fusco (as Sam J. Coppola)
Nina Hansen ... Grandmother
Lisa Peluso ... Linda

Denny Dillon ... Doreen
Bert Michaels ... Pete

Robert Costanzo ... Paint Store Customer (as Robert Costanza)
Robert Weil ... Becker
Shelly Batt ... Girl in Disco

Fran Drescher ... Connie
Donald Gantry ... Jay Langhart
Murray Moston ... Haberdashery Salesman

William Andrews ... Detective

Ann Travolta ... Pizza Girl
Helen Travolta ... Lady in Paint Store
Ellen March ... Bartender
Monti Rock III ... The Deejay

Val Bisoglio ... Frank Sr.
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

John Badham ... Pedestrian #1 (uncredited)
Roy Cheverie ... The Wrong Partner (uncredited)
Adrienne King ... Dancer (uncredited)
Chere Mauldin ... Dancer (uncredited)
M.J. Quinn ... Dancer (uncredited)

Alberto Vazquez ... Gang Member (uncredited)
Frankie Verroca ... Dancer (uncredited)

Directed by
John Badham 
 
Writing credits
Nik Cohn (story "Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night")

Norman Wexler (screenplay)

Produced by
Milt Felsen .... associate producer
Kevin McCormick .... executive producer
Robert Stigwood .... producer
 
Original Music by
Barry Gibb 
Maurice Gibb 
Robin Gibb 
 
Cinematography by
Ralf D. Bode (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
David Rawlins 
 
Casting by
Shirley Rich 
 
Production Design by
Charles Bailey 
 
Set Decoration by
George DeTitta Sr.  (as George Detitta)
 
Costume Design by
Patrizia von Brandenstein  (as Patrizia Von Brandenstein)
 
Makeup Department
Max Henriquez .... makeup artist (as Henriquez)
Joe Tubens .... hair designer
 
Production Management
John Nicolella .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Joseph Ray .... second assistant director
Allan Wertheim .... assistant director
 
Art Department
James Mazzola .... property master
William Canfield .... set dresser (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Michael Colgan .... sound editor
Robert W. Glass Jr. .... sound re-recording mixer
Les Lazarowitz .... sound mixer
John T. Reitz .... sound re-recording mixer
John Wilkinson .... sound re-recording mixer (as John K. Wilkinson)
 
Stunts
Paul Nuckles .... stunt coordinator
Lightning Bear .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Holly Bower .... still photographer
James Finnerty .... key grip
Tom Priestley Jr. .... camera operator
William Ward .... gaffer (as Bill Ward)
Gary Muller .... first assistant camera (uncredited)
Robert Paone .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Jennifer Nichols .... costumer
 
Editorial Department
Angelo Corrao .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Jean-Marc Vasseur .... assistant film editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
John Caper Jr. .... music editor
David Shire .... composer: additional music
David Shire .... music adaptor
Lester Wilson .... stager: musical numbers
Dan Wallin .... score mixer (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Arlene Albertson .... production office coordinator
Lorraine Fields .... assistant choreographer
Jimmy Gambina .... technical consultant (as James Gambina)
Gary Kalkin .... unit publicist
Lloyd Kaufman .... location executive
Carl Lotito .... assistant: Mr. Stigwood
Joy McMillan .... assistant: Mr. Stigwood
Colleen Murphy .... assistant: Mr. Badham
Jo-Jo Smith .... dance consultant
Ron Stigwood .... assistant: Mr. Stigwood (as Ronald Stigwood)
Renata Stoia .... script supervisor
Lester Wilson .... choreographer
Deney Terrio .... dance instructor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated R for strong language, sexuality/nudity and some drug content
Runtime:
118 min | USA:113 min (PG version)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Australia:R | Australia:MA (re-rating) | Brazil:16 (re-rating) (2014) | Brazil:12 (video rating) (1999) | Canada:PA (Manitoba) | Canada:A (Nova Scotia) (edited US version) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Canada:R (original rating) | Canada:14A (re-rating) | Chile:18 | Finland:K-16 | France:-12 | Iceland:L | Italy:VM14 | Malaysia:(Banned) | Netherlands:AL | Netherlands:16 (orginal rating) | New Zealand:R16 | Norway:18 | Norway:16 (cut) | Peru:18 | Singapore:M18 | South Korea:18 | Spain:18 | Sweden:15 (original rating) | Sweden:11 (re-rating) (1978) | UK:X (original rating) | UK:18 (video rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (cut) | UK:A (re-rating) (1979) (cut) | USA:R | USA:PG (edited version) | West Germany:12

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Five additional instrumental cues by David Shire were recorded for the film: "Barracuda Hangout", "Tony and Stephanie", "Near the Brooklyn Bridge", "Death on the Bridge" and "All Night Train". However, only one was credited, and all remained unreleased.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: After Tony and Stephanie go out for coffee/dinner for the first time, they walk down the sidewalk together and it's dry out. Just minutes later, Tony drives down the street with his friends and drops one of them off, and the streets are wet.See more »
Quotes:
Tony Manero:You know what Gus, I feel like breaking your broken legs!See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Chicken Run (2000)See more »
Soundtrack:
Staying AliveSee more »

FAQ

What are the differences between the PG Version and the Uncensored R-Rated Version?
Was Annette raped?
See more »
43 out of 46 people found the following review useful.
Beautifully Defines An Era On The Backdrop Of A Realistic Class Study and Dynamic Music, 20 March 2007
Author: Det_McNulty from London

Although it may seem dated and cheesy to some viewers today Saturday Night Fever remains one of the most underrated examples of '70s pop-culture. It is undoubtedly the quintessential dance flick and remains one of the most entertaining films of all-time. Yet, behind all the music and entertaining aura you are actually viewing a drama studying the American class system and young rebellion. Though at times it is slightly exaggerated, it still manages to capture a vast amount of authenticity and ultimately the sights and sounds of the time.

Saturday Night Fever follows self-proclaimed "dance king" Tony Manero (John Travolta) and his love of dancing and the trials and tribulations of his life in the Bronx. He soon meets an arrogant fellow dancer named Stephanie Mangano (Karen Lynn Gorney). Quickly becoming attracted and influenced by the women he starts questioning the way he lives his life.

The film is not always upbeat and at times can be depressing, particularly the scenes depicting peer-pressure. Although both have their differences, both are very alike and ultimately want to be something "big". There are also the elements of jealously, rivalry, religion, rebellion, respect and racism added into the film. This captures the realism of the time and with more accuracy and honesty than a lot of films. Just take a look at the brief scene where Tony is on the tube, this is an oddly poignant, effecting and compelling scene presenting Tony's confused emotions.

Saturday Night Fever still carries the vibe, rhythm and atmosphere it did back in '77. It remains one of the most influential films for both the film-world and pop-culture. Infamously holding some of the greatest dance sequences ever committed film; you can feel the energy, emotions, time and determination that were spent perfecting the dance scenes to the finest detail. The lighting is perfect at creating the "disco world", the set-piece of the 2001 Disco is one of the film's many iconic highlights.

John Travolta dedicates himself to his dancing and character, fitting the role with a graceful ease. The film goes into depth at studying characters too, it shows how desperate everyone is to fit in and be able to make an impressive image. The fantastic shots on character's feet show the "strut" in their walk, representing their desire to maintain their reputation of being "cool". All the characters want to be something, while a lot of them will never add up to anything due to their working-class backgrounds. There are a fair amount of American social-comments scattered throughout the film and retaining a surprising amount of intelligent value.

The gloriously groovy and funky soundtrack is possibly the film's finest element. The music accompanies the dance sequences with an amazing amount of memorably robust imagery. The use of The Bee Gees' music is wonderful to listen to and also for helping to create an ambiguous atmosphere of love, drugs and sex. The shooting techniques in the disco are magnificent for filming the dance scenes and fit perfectly alongside the other technical elements.

Saturday Night Fever is a far more professional film than one might expect, it has intelligence as well as entertainment, which is something that makes a more than just admirable achievement. It is a truly remarkable triumph and a film that deserves more appreciation than it gets.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (202 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Saturday Night Fever (1977)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Vs Grease ephexis1983
The script kept this from being a great movie...... krdixon12
I saw this movie in 2002, on TNT... Little Bobby didn't kill himself! Duc_de_Richleau
The 'gang' storyline... knight523-383-350235
Double J's comment? selectrick
Isn't bridge tresspassing a crime? cryptical70
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