IMDb > Orca (1977)
Orca
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Orca (1977) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 9 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
5.5/10   6,376 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
No change in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Contact:
View company contact information for Orca on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
22 July 1977 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Terror just beneath the surface
Plot:
A hunter squares off against a killer whale seeking vengeance for the death of its mate. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(20 articles)
Orca DVD Review
 (From The Hollywood News. 8 April 2014, 3:00 AM, PDT)

Revolt of Nature Horror Films: The Must-Sees
 (From SoundOnSight. 26 October 2013, 10:14 PM, PDT)

Spaghetti Western Screenwriter Who Helped to Launch Eastwood's Movie Career Has Died
 (From Alt Film Guide. 26 September 2013, 1:42 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
Greatest movie of all time See more (103 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
Michael Anderson 
 
Writing credits
Luciano Vincenzoni  story and screenplay and
Sergio Donati 

Robert Towne  uncredited

Produced by
Dino De Laurentiis .... executive producer
Luciano Vincenzoni .... producer
 
Original Music by
Ennio Morricone 
 
Cinematography by
J. Barry Herron 
Ted Moore 
 
Film Editing by
John Bloom 
Marion Rothman 
Ralph E. Winters 
 
Production Design by
Mario Garbuglia 
 
Art Direction by
Ferdinando Giovannoni 
Boris Juraga 
 
Set Decoration by
John Godfrey 
Armando Scarano 
 
Costume Design by
Jost Jakob 
 
Makeup Department
Neville Smallwood .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Pino Butti .... unit production manager
Roberto de Laurentiis .... unit production manager
Les Kimber .... unit production manager
Stanley Neufeld .... production manager: Canada
William O'Sullivan .... production manager: Canada
Phil Tucker .... post-production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Peter Bennett .... second assistant director
Flondar Brunelli .... assistant director: second unit
Brian W. Cook .... assistant director
Rob Lockwood .... assistant director: second unit
Terry Needham .... second assistant director
Folco Quilici .... second unit director
Folco Quilici .... underwater unit director
 
Art Department
Allan Gordon .... property master (as Allan Jack Gordon)
Sherman Labby .... production illustrator
Bill MacSems .... property master
Guglielmo Modestini .... set painter
Aldo Puccini .... construction coordinator
 
Sound Department
John Bramall .... sound mixer
Bill Cook .... boom operator (as William Cook)
Trevor Pyke .... sound re-recording mixer
Winston Ryder .... sound effects
Nicholas Stevenson .... sound effects (as Nick Stevenson)
 
Special Effects by
Giuseppe Carozza .... mechanical effects
Jim Hole .... mechanical effects
Alex Weldon .... special effects (as Alex C. Weldon)
 
Visual Effects by
Fernando Valento .... miniature coordinator
Frank Van der Veer .... photographic effects supervisor
 
Stunts
Emilio Messina .... underwater stunts
Sergio Mioni .... stunt double
Romano Puppo .... stunt coordinator
Max Diamond .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Jack Atcheler .... camera operator
Alfonso Avincola .... still photographer
Roger Berner .... assistant camera
Vittorio Dragonetti .... underwater camera operator
Maurice Gillett .... gaffer
Ray Hall .... key grip
John Harris .... camera operator (as John S. Harris)
Ignazio Maccarone .... underwater gaffer
Massimiliano Sano .... assistant underwater camera operator
David Wynn-Jones .... focus puller
Bob Bremner .... best boy (uncredited)
Michel Paul Bélisle .... lamp operator (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Ian Hickinbotham .... wardrobe assistant
Philippe Pickford .... wardrobe
Yvonne Zarb Cousin .... wardrobe mistress (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Chris Kelly .... assistant film editor
 
Music Department
Michael Clifford .... music editor
Sergio Marcotulli .... music recordist
Ennio Morricone .... conductor
Percy Edwards .... whale vocalizations (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Angela Allen .... continuity supervisor
Sonny Allen .... director of training: marine world
Rinaldo Campoli .... chemical effects
Lou Dyer .... unit publicist
Gordon K. Kee .... production auditor (as Gordon Kee)
Morrie Nierenberg .... location auditor (as Morris Nierenburg)
Jack Piler .... unit publicist
Giuliano Principato .... production assistant
Frank Strzalkowski .... marine mammal trainer: marine world
Luciano Tartaglia .... production accountant
Ron Taylor .... shark sequence: Australia
Lester Simms .... boat captain (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
92 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Canada:14 (Nova Scotia) | Finland:K-16 | Iceland:16 | Netherlands:16 | Norway:15 | Sweden:15 | UK:PG | UK:A (original rating) | USA:PG
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The orca was portrayed by an animatronic whale, filmed off the coasts of Malta and Newfoundland, and stock footage taken at Marine World in Redwood City, California. The stock footage orcas were named Yaka (female) and Nepo (male). They were both captured in 1969. Nepo died in 1980; Yaka died in 1997.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: Whales and dolphins don't breathe automatically like humans do. They sleep with half of their brain at a time because they need to come to the surface to breathe. If someone really tranquilized an orca like Nolan did with the needle in the harpoon, both halves of its brain would be asleep at the same time, and it would stop breathing and drown.See more »
Quotes:
Rachel:[while listening to Orca's sounds through a hydrophone] What is he saying?
Captain Nolan:You're me, he says... I'm you, he says... you're my... drunk driver... he says...
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Gray Matters (2006/I)See more »
Soundtrack:
My Love, We Are OneSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
119 out of 184 people found the following review useful.
Greatest movie of all time, 7 August 2003
Author: DroogAlexK from Gainesville, FL

Orca is the greatest movie of all time. I'm sure most people say that their favorite movie is the greatest of all time, but they are all wrong.

Orca brings together some of the finest actors. Richard Harris, who unfortunately will be remembered for some trivial movie about a boy wizard and a throwaway musical about King Arthur, does his finest work in Orca. His portrayal of Captain Nolan, an emotionally torn fisherman coming to terms with the fact the marine animals have feelings, deserved the Oscar. Did he win? No, that is not a strike against this fine film. Charlotte Rampling brings texture to the marine biologist in love with a whale baby killer. The romance between the two is subtle. While most modern Hollywood movies would just throw in a gratuitous sex scene, Rampling accomplishes just as much with confused looks and having her shirt zipped down in one scene. Will Sampson, who is sadly better known for some movie about flying over a cuckoo's nest, also does a fantastic job of playing the Native American guy who says cryptic things and has ice fall on him. Robert Carradine, famous for Revenge of the Nerds, shows great range in not being around much and then being eaten by the whale. Bo Derek never equaled her success in this film elsewhere. I really believed her leg was bit off. She sold me.

The effects were great for the time. Many forget what special effects were like in those days, myself included because I was not born yet, but the point remains. The strange fisheye lens used to represent the whales point of view was genius. And I challenge everyone to find a more realistic looking whale fetus in a movie. You can't, you just can't. The dramatic fight between Captain Nolan and the whale could have easily become silly, but it doesn't. The Arctic Circle is accurately represented as a cold place with many iceberg, some of which whales can thwack themselves upon catapulting middle-aged Irishmen forty feet in the air. Keep in mind, also, this was done without the use of computer graphics. Steven Spielberg did not even put the shark in Jaws until over halfway through the film. Why? To hide a machine so fake that I can only assume one of his children made it at camp. The mechanical killer whale in Orca is almost indistinguishable from the stock footage of killer whales continually played throughout the movie.

In 1977, how many directors were brave enough to shoot a killer whale jumping from one side of the boat, eating actor Robert Carradine, and landing on the other side? Just one, Michael Anderson. His bold choices along with screenwriters Luciano Vincenzoni and Sergio Donati (who both show an above average command of the English languages for native-born Italian speakers) make the film a statement not only about whale hunting and whale forgiveness seeking, but also about humanity. Charlotte Rampling's appeal to Nolan not to go fight the whale just because the whale wants revenge is not just about social protocols of how to make it up to the father of a whale baby you accidentally killed, but also an argument against the death penalty. Will Sampson's pointless death is an indictment of the senseless slaughter of tens of millions of Native Americans. When the whale knocks down Captain Nolan's house without any explanation of this whale became such a genius that he can not only knows to knock down structural supports but also can look up addresses in the phone book, it directly shows how our incursion into the world of nature is two-fold. Robert Carradine's tragic death in the film is social commentary on the probability of being eaten if you stand around on a boat being followed by a crazed killer whale. And probably also something about Vietnam, I assume.

And while most in Hollywood choose not to admit it, many have ripped off Orca. The dead baby scene in Trainspotting is suspiciously reminiscent of the dead whale fetus scene in Orca. The creepy quasi-romance between an intelligent female and a somewhat crazy violent child murderer is directly stolen by George Lucas for Star Wars: Episode II. The use of icebergs is blatantly co-opted by Titanic, and I have never heard James Cameron so much as thank Michael Anderson. And don't even get me started on Free Willy. Orca is a complicated story. If you only enjoy movies with obvious heroes and villains, this is not for you. The characters are conflicted. Very conflicted. Take for instance how the killer whale jumps for joy after biting off Bo Derek's leg. The whale shows both glee in his jumps, but also the pain of having lost his family and never being able to bring them back no matter how hard he fights those who took them from him. Like Batman. You see, the only thing black and white in this movie is the killer whale itself. While Orca does not now get the respect it deserves, in time people will realize its genius. Just as people did not understand gravity or continental drift, in time they will come to recognize Orca as the greatest cinematic achievement of all time.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (103 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Orca (1977)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Reason for the 'Orca kills shark' scene oliverfennell
Did the orca commit suicide at the end? Cristopher_Jeorge
Who are we supposed to be rooting for here? bAzTNM
A really beautiful score SJMcGuire2
Better Than Jaws dubrobot
fetus scene!!! s-raitchey
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
The Perfect Storm Avatar Jaws Danger Island The Fog
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Adventure section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.