The Last Wave
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

7 items from 2015


200 Greatest Horror Films (20-11)

30 October 2015 6:53 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

20. The Innocents

Directed by Jack Clayton

Written by William Archibald and Truman Capote

UK, 1961

Genre: Hauntings

The Innocents, which was co-written by Truman Capote, is the first of many screen adaptations of The Turn of the Screw. If you’ve never heard of it, don’t feel bad because most people haven’t – but The Innocents deserves its rightful spot on any list of great horror films. Here is one of the few films where the ghost story takes place mostly in daylight, and the lush photography, which earned cinematographer Freddie Francis one of his two Oscar wins, is simply stunning. Meanwhile, director Jack Clayton and Francis made great use of long, steady shots, which suggest corruption is lurking everywhere inside the grand estate. The Innocents also features three amazing performances; the first two come courtesy of child actors Pamela Franklin (The Legend of Hell House), and Martin Stephens (Village of the Damned »

- Ricky Fernandes

Permalink | Report a problem


200 Greatest Horror Films (70-61)

27 October 2015 3:08 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Special Mention: The Last Wave

Directed by Peter Weir

Written by Tony Morphett and Peter Weir

Australia, 1977

Genre: Psychological Thriller

The tagline reads, “The Occult Forces. The Ritual Murder. The Sinister Storms. The Prophetic Dreams. The Last Wave.”

Peter Weir follows up on his critically acclaimed masterpiece Picnic at Hanging Rock with this visually striking and totally engrossing surrealist psychological thriller. Much like Picnic, The Last Wave is built around a mystery that may have a supernatural explanation. And like many Peter Weir movies, The Last Wave explores the conflict between two radically different cultures- in this case, that of Aboriginal Australians and the white Europeans.

It is about a white lawyer, David Burton (Richard Chamberlain), whose seemingly normal life is rattled after he takes on a pro bono legal aid case to defend a group of Aborigines from a murder charge in Sydney. The mystery within the mystery surrounding »

- Ricky Fernandes

Permalink | Report a problem


Lovecraft by Any Other Name: 10 Films Inspired by H.P. Lovecraft

8 October 2015 3:44 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

H.P. Lovecraft doesn’t translate to film very well. Many have tried, few have succeed. Lovecraft’s stories are mood-driven, using his dense antiquarian writing style to tell tales that say so much while unfolding so little in terms of action. This doesn’t exactly lend itself to a cinematic adaptation. Yet several films have found a way to tackle Lovecraft without actually adapting Lovecraft. The following films pay tribute to Lovecraft without actually adapting any of his stories.

10.Evil Dead

Sam Raimi’s 1981 The Evil Dead features one of Lovecraft’s most widely known creations: The Necronomicon. Lovecraft used this book of magic, which was attributed to the fictional Abdul Alhazred, in several of his stories. This recurrence was one of the many Lovecraftian elements that gave a reader the sense of an ever-growing mythology — stories all loosely connected, existing in the same mad universe. Lovecraft wrote a short »

- Chris Evangelista

Permalink | Report a problem


Special Sir Christopher Lee Tribute Screening & 40th Anniversary Screening of The Four Musketeers (1975) in Los Angeles

1 September 2015 4:46 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Todd Garbarini

Update: Producer Ilya Salkind now also slated to appear. 

Richard Lester’s film The Four Musketeers is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. With an all-star cast that includes Oliver Reed, Faye Dunaway, Raquel Welch, Richard Chamberlain, Michael York, and Sir Christopher Lee, the film will be shown on Tuesday, September 29th, 2015 at 7:00 pm as a special tribute to Sir Christopher as well as part of the theatre's Anniversary Classics series. Actors Richard Chamberlain and Michael York are scheduled to appear at the screening and take part in a Q & A and discussion on the making of the film.

From the press release:

Last year the Anniversary Classics series presented a successful 40th anniversary screening of The Three Musketeers, director Richard Lester's stylish and entertaining retelling of Alexandre Dumas' classic novel. Join us this year to see Lester's stirring conclusion of the tale, The Four Musketeers »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


Charlie's Country Pits the Cops Against a (Real) Down-on-His-Luck Aboriginal Actor

2 June 2015 9:00 PM, PDT | Village Voice | See recent Village Voice news »

The special quality of Charlie’s Country is the profound camaraderie shared by its director, Rolf de Heer, and its star, David Gulpilil (Walkabout, The Last Wave). The two have worked together before (The Tracker, Ten Canoes), but the origins of Charlie’s Country are personal to an exceptional degree. In 2011, de Heer learned that Gulpilil had landed in jail; he got in touch with the washed-up performer, and the germ of a story — intrinsically inspired by Gulpilil’s drink-addled life experiences — blossomed.

Co-written by de Heer and Gulpilil, the movie has a bracing (if unsurprising) narrative of societal suppression: Northern Territory dweller Charlie (Gulpilil) finds his roaming Aboriginal lifesty »

Permalink | Report a problem


The Year of Living Dangerously rewatched – Linda Hunt is unforgettable

8 January 2015 5:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

What a bold yet strangely sensible turn of casting by Peter Weir: hiring a woman to play a man simply because she was the best fit for the part

Van Badham: female actors want better roles because none exist

Gallipoli rewatched – Weir deconstructs war as grand adventure

The Last Wave rewatched – mysticism, prophecy and end of times

Australian cinema in 2014 delivered not one but two great performances from female actors playing women who become men.

In the Spierig brothers’ madcap time travel movie Predestination, Sarah Snook turned heads in a role that not only saw her play both genders but also offered a wild and saucy take on what might happen if a person bumped into a version of themselves from the future. Del Herbert-Jane struck a more melancholic note in director Sophie Hyde’s drama 52 Tuesdays, which focused on a daughter’s reaction to her mother’s »

- Luke Buckmaster

Permalink | Report a problem


The Year of Living Dangerously rewatched – Linda Hunt is unforgettable

8 January 2015 5:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

What a bold yet strangely sensible turn of casting by Peter Weir: hiring a woman to play a man simply because she was the best fit for the part

Van Badham: female actors want better roles because none exist

Gallipoli rewatched – Weir deconstructs war as grand adventure

The Last Wave rewatched – mysticism, prophecy and end of times

Australian cinema in 2014 delivered not one but two great performances from female actors playing women who become men.

In the Spierig brothers’ madcap time travel movie Predestination, Sarah Snook turned heads in a role that not only saw her play both genders but also offered a wild and saucy take on what might happen if a person bumped into a version of themselves from the future. Del Herbert-Jane struck a more melancholic note in director Sophie Hyde’s drama 52 Tuesdays, which focused on a daughter’s reaction to her mother’s »

- Luke Buckmaster

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

7 items from 2015


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners