High Anxiety (1977) - News Poster

(1977)

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Jacob Tremblay, Christopher Lloyd, Kenan Thompson Join Voice Cast of Lani Pixels Movie

Jacob Tremblay, Christopher Lloyd, Kenan Thompson Join Voice Cast of Lani Pixels Movie
Lani Pixels has signed Jacob Tremblay, Christopher Lloyd, Kenan Thompson, and Mel Brooks as the voice cast in an untitled 3D animated feature directed by Kim Pagel.

Thomas Pagel, who co-founded Lani Pixels with Kim Pagel, is producing with Jason Mirch co-producing. Verité Entertainment’s René Veilleux and Donald Roman Lopez are associate producing.

The movie follows a brother and sister as they attempt to rescue their grandfather from supernatural forces that have invaded his isolated island. Guided by a charming Irish rogue, the siblings end up on a dangerous journey filled with magic and mystery. Production and additional casting are currently underway.

“It is an honor to be working with such a talented and dynamic cast on this project,” said Kim Pagel. “While this has been a passion project for many years, the themes of family unity and courage in the face of adversity are particularly important these days.”

Tremblay is starring
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Bad Girls Of "Batman" And Legendary Movie Poster Artist Robert Tanenbaum To Appear At Los Angeles Comic Book And Science Fiction Con

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

The Los Angeles Comic Book And Science Fiction Convention presents Classic Movie Poster Artist Robert Tanenbaum, Jean Hale (In Like Flint), Sharyn Wynters (The Female Bunch), and Donna Loren (Bikini Beach) at the August 20, 2017 Show.

Robert Tanenbaum is a Movie Poster Artist with an over 50 year career illustrating every film genre such as Science Fiction, Horror, Comedy, War, Drama and Martial Arts. Robert has illustrated such Classic Movie Posters as A Christmas Story, Battle For The Planet Of The Apes, Cujo, Five Fingers Of Death, Black Christmas, Super Fly, The Color Of Money, My Bodyguard, Dirty Mary Crazy Larry, The Iron Cross, The Eagle Has Landed, Ransom, Cleopatra Jones And The Casino Of Gold, Hot Potato, Mel Brooks High Anxiety and Silent Night, Evil Night. Robert’s art is featured on the first announcement that Jaws was being made into a Movie.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Mel Brooks’ Blazing Saddles Screens Midnights at The Tivoli This Weekend

“They said you was hung!”

“They was right!”

Mel BrooksBlazing Saddles screens this Friday and Saturday nights (July 7th and 8th) at midnight at the Tivoli Theater as part of their ‘Reel Late at the Tivoli’ Midnight series.

I showed the condensed Super-8 version of Blazing Saddles, appropriately enough, at my Super-8 Politically Incorrect Movie Madness show a few years ago at The Way Out Club and there are enough N-words in the 18-minute edit alone to make Paula Dean blush, but damn, this movie just keeps getting funnier as it ages!

Blazing Saddles is my favorite Mel Brooks comedy. Yes, even more than Young Frankenstein – it’s hard to believe Brooks produced both yuk-fests the same year. I just watched his 1977 follow-up High Anxiety on 16mm last weekend for the first time since it was new and Yikes! – I see why it was a critical disaster – didn’t laugh once!
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Mel Brooks Says 'Spaceballs 2' Is Still Possible

Once upon a time, Mel Brooks was a mighty force in comic cinema. Beginning with The Producers in 1967, he directed a string of very funny movies, reaching an early crescendo with Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein, both released in 1974. The movies that followed -- Silent Movie, High Anxiety and History of the World: Part 1, may have been a step down in consistency and popularity, even though they were still hilarious. In 1987, he faced his toughest challenge yet, making fun of popular sci-fi movies (mostly the original Star Wars trilogy) in Spaceballs. The intentionally low-budget look and feel of the movie was, of course, part of the joke (watch the clip above), and Brooks was spot-on with much of the humor, which ridiculed the costumes, the portentous dialogue, silly...

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See full article at Movies.com »

Mel Brooks Is Definitely Having Discussions About Spaceballs 2

Actor, writer, director, producer, and all-round showman Mel Brooks is a bona fide icon of comedy and cinema – and with good reason. He has, over the course of his 68-year career, delivered such classics as The Producers, Blazing Saddles and High Anxiety. But it’s another two, very different films of his that have combined to bring us some welcome news today, as the filmmaker discussed Spaceballs 2 at a screening of Young Frankenstein.

The screening took place at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center on Sunday, May 21st, and Brooks was on hand for a Q & A session afterward. During this event, he was asked about the likelihood of a sequel to 1987’s Spaceballs, and Brooks confirmed that discussions are underway.

“Well, you know, I’m doing it. MGM is slightly interested in doing it because of the new Star Wars… They think maybe, so we’re talking.”

So… will
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Hitchcock/Truffaut – Review

I was 12 years old in 1968. One of my favorite places was the library, in those days the closest library to us was the Tesson Ferry Branch in South St. Louis County. My most prized possession was my library card.

My Mother used to drop me off there on a Saturday or a summer weekday and I would spend the whole day reading. One of those days I pulled a book off the shelf called Hitchcock/Truffaut and sat down to read it. I knew who Alfred Hitchcock was from his television show, and from his monthly Mystery Magazine as well as anthologies that I was reading avidly, Tales That Frightened Even Me, More Tales for the Nervous and, my favorite, Stories to be Read After Dark.

I was aware that Alfred Hitchcock was most renowned for directing movies. I had seen a few on television, Saboteur was a mainstay on Kplr TV,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

TCM Classic Film Festival to Open With ‘In the Heat of the Night’

TCM Classic Film Festival to Open With ‘In the Heat of the Night’
Turner Classic Movies has announced it will open the 2017 TCM Classic Film Festival with a 50th anniversary screening of “In the Heat of the Night.” The fest will also celebrate Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher by screening “Singin’ in the Rain” and “Postcards From the Edge” and hosting conversations with family members Todd Fisher and Billie Lourd at both screenings.

Other honorees who will participate in the tribute are “In the Heat of the Night” actors Sidney Poitier and Lee Grant, producer Walter Mirisch and composer Quincy Jones. Mel Brooks, Buck Henry and “Saturday Night Fever” star Donna Pescow and director John Badham are set to make appearances during the festival as well.

The festival, themed “Make Em’ Laugh: Comedy in the Movies,” will take place for the eight consecutive year at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel from April 6-9 and will also honor actor-director Peter Bogdanovich with screenings of “The Last Picture Show,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jack Riley, Voice of Stu Pickles on Rugrats, Dies at 80

  • PEOPLE.com
Jack Riley, Voice of Stu Pickles on Rugrats, Dies at 80
A version of this article originally appeared on EW.com."Jack Riley, an alum of The Bob Newhart Show and the voice of Stu Pickles on Rugrats, has died at the age of 80. The actor died from pneumonia in Los Angeles early Friday morning, his representative Paul Doherty tells Entertainment Weekly. Riley is best known for playing Elliot Carlin, one of Bob Newhart’s patients — a role he reprised in 1985 on the NBC medical series St. Elsewhere. He also appeared in several of Mel Brooks’ films, including History of the World: Part I, High Anxiety, and To Be or Not to Be.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Jack Riley, Voice of Stu Pickles on Rugrats, Dies at 80

Jack Riley, Voice of Stu Pickles on Rugrats, Dies at 80
A version of this article originally appeared on EW.com."

Jack Riley, an alum of The Bob Newhart Show and the voice of Stu Pickles on Rugrats, has died at the age of 80. The actor died from pneumonia in Los Angeles early Friday morning, his representative Paul Doherty tells Entertainment Weekly.

Riley is best known for playing Elliot Carlin, one of Bob Newhart’s patients — a role he reprised in 1985 on the NBC medical series St. Elsewhere. He also appeared in several of Mel Brooks’ films, including History of the World: Part I, High Anxiety, and To Be or Not to Be.
See full article at People.com - TV Watch »

Jack Riley, The Bob Newhart Show's Elliot Carlin, Dead at 80

Jack Riley, The Bob Newhart Show's Elliot Carlin, Dead at 80
Jack Riley, fondly remembered as neurotic Elliot Carlin on The Bob Newhart Show in the 1970s, has died of pneumonia and infection at the age of 80.

After appearing in nearly 50 episodes of the hit sitcom as shrink Bob Hartley’s “persecuted” patient, the onetime radio personality reprised his role on St. Elsewhere in 1985.

Riley also made several Mel Brooks movies (among them, High Anxiety and History of the World, Part I), guest-starred on everything from Gomer Pyle: Usmc to Friends, and lent his voice to the character of Stu Pickles in both Rugrats and All Grown Up!.

Related storiesSimpsons Actress
See full article at TVLine.com »

Jack Riley, Who Played the Neurotic Eliot Carlin on 'The Bob Newhart Show,' Dies at 80

Jack Riley, Who Played the Neurotic Eliot Carlin on 'The Bob Newhart Show,' Dies at 80
Actor Jack Riley, who specialized in playing neurotic comic characters like psychologist patient Elliot Carlin on The Bob Newhart Show of the 1970s, died Friday. He was 81. Riley, who also voiced Stu Pickles on The Rugrats cartoon and appeared in several Mel Brooks comedies, died in a Los Angeles hospital of pneumonia after a long illness, Paul Doherty at Cunningham Escott Slevin & Doherty told The Hollywood Reporter. Riley appeared in the Brooks-directed films Silent Movie (1976), High Anxiety (1977), History of the World: Part I (1981) and Spaceballs (1987) and in two other movies that Brooks produced,

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Jack Riley Dies: ‘Bob Newhart Show’ & Mel Brooks Movie Actor Was 80

Jack Riley Dies: ‘Bob Newhart Show’ & Mel Brooks Movie Actor Was 80
Jack Riley, a veteran of The Bob Newhart Show and several Mel Brooks films who also voiced a popular Rugrats character, died today in Los Angeles. He was 80. Riley’s wife Ginger Lawrence told Deadline he died of pneumonia and infection. Along with playing the neurotic Elliot Carlin on Bob Newhart and appearing in Brooks films including High Anxiety and History of the World, Part I, Riley voiced Stu Pickles on Nickelodeon’s Rugrats and its follow-up series All Growed…
See full article at Deadline »

Jack Riley Dies: ‘Bob Newhart Show’ & Mel Brooks Movie Actor Was 80

Jack Riley, a veteran of The Bob Newhart Show and several Mel Brooks films who also voiced a popular Rugrats character, died today in Los Angeles. He was 80. Riley’s wife Ginger Lawrence told Deadline he died of pneumonia and infection. Along with playing the neurotic Elliot Carlin on Bob Newhart and appearing in Brooks films including High Anxiety and History of the World, Part I, Riley voiced Stu Pickles on Nickelodeon’s Rugrats and its follow-up series All Growed…
See full article at Deadline TV »

The Top Ten Funny Ladies of the Movies

The recent box office success of The Boss firmly establishes Melissa McCarthy as the current queen of movie comedies (Amy Schumer could be a new contender after an impressive debut last Summer with Trainwreck), but let us think back about those other funny ladies of filmdom. So while we’re enjoying the female reboot/re-imagining of Ghostbusters and those Bad Moms, here’s a top ten list that will hopefully inspire lots of laughter and cause you to search out some classic comedies. It’s tough to narrow them down to ten, but we’ll do our best, beginning with… 10. Eve Arden The droll Ms. Arden represents the comic sidekicks who will attempt to puncture the pomposity of the leading ladies with a well-placed wisecrack (see also the great Thelma Ritter in Rear Window). Her career began in the early 1930’s with great bit roles in Stage Door and Dancing Lady.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Bates Motel season 5: first images of Rihanna as Marion Crane

Tony Sokol Feb 1, 2017

Rihanna is set to try on Janet Leigh’s shower cap, taking on the role of Marion Crane for Bates Motel season 5...

Back in July we heard that Rihanna is set to appear in Bates Motel season 5 in role of Marion Crane, the character made famous by Janet Leigh in Alfred Hitchcock’s slasher classic Psycho.

See related Alan Rickman interview: A Little Chaos, villains, Doctor Who

Now, thanks to Entertainment Weekly, we have these pictures to prove it...

The announcement of RiRi's involvement in the show came via video at the Bates Motel season 5 panel at San Diego Comic-Con.

Vera Farmiga, who plays Norma; Freddie Highmore, who plays Norman, Max Thieriot, who plays Dylan Massett and Nestor Carbonell, who plays Sheriff Alex Romero, joined the show’s creators Kerry Ehrin and Carlton Cuse were at the panel.

"We wanted to thrust the iconic role into a
See full article at Den of Geek »

Criterion Reflections – The Producers (1968) – Ld #35

David’s Quick Take for the tl;dr Media Consumer:

A brash, vulgar, wildly energetic and shamelessly provocative comedy romp that launched Mel Brooks as a film director, Gene Wilder as a popular comic actor, and grossly expanded the latitude extended to comedians in cinema, establishing radically poor taste as an acceptable marketing strategy in mainstream entertainment. Though The Producers is fondly remembered, massively influential and boasts some truly unforgettable sequences of inspired lunacy, too much time is dedicated to histrionic leering, shouting and shrieking episodes that don’t deliver enough in terms of wit to earn my enthusiastic endorsement overall. The story line is pretty familiar – a rambunctious Broadway showman conspires with a neurotic accountant to bilk investors in an offensive production, only to see their plan foiled when the play becomes an unexpected hit. The premise is clever and offers a broad platform for unbridled zaniness. A lot
See full article at CriterionCast »

7 non-horror classics to stream on Netflix this Halloween

  • Hitfix
7 non-horror classics to stream on Netflix this Halloween
Halloween's here and some of us have had our fill of knife-thrusting psychos and inarticulate zombies. (Though if you want a list of the 100 best horror movies, you're not going to do any better than this.) Here's what to stream on Netflix this All Hallow's Eve in case you're in the mood for classic suspense and haunting paranoia. "Chinatown" Let's get one thing straight about Halloween: It's not really about spookiness; it's about eeriness. I'd argue there's no eerier movie of the 1970s than "Chinatown," which manages to be 100% suspenseful even though its plot is simple and its protagonist is a classically perturbed private eye. Though there are a couple of scares (namely the cameo of director Roman Polanski), you mostly find yourself awed by the lingering weirdness of the story at hand. What is going on here? What's Jake Gittes (Jack Nicholson) really on to? And what
See full article at Hitfix »

Jean-Luc Godard’s Late Films: A Primer

In 1960, Jean-Luc Godard’s first feature film, Breathless, would make him an icon of French cinema, inaugurating a career that has consistently expanded society’s definitions and expectations of cinema. That film alone would have reason enough to consider him an important filmmaker, but Godard went on to direct fourteen more features through 1967, culminating with his attack on bourgeois culture, Weekend.

Following this extraordinary run of films, Godard found himself at a moment of great change. His romantic and artistic partnership with Anna Karina had ended, to be replaced with a new (but short-lived) marriage to Anne Wiazemsky, who would serve as a bridge to the current youth culture. Godard’s politics had also changed considerably since the 1950s. His conservatism, a relic of his parents’s politics, had been replaced with an interest in Maoism and an increasing distaste for anything evoking America. (Classic Hollywood cinema initially got a pass,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Cancelled: "Crazy Mama" 40th Anniversary Screening, L.A., September 24

  • CinemaRetro
Notice: The Royal Laemmle Theatre In L.A Has Announced That This Screening Has Been Cancelled! Click Here

Jonathan Demme’s 1975 film Crazy Mama, which stars Cloris Leachman, Stuart Whitman, Ann Southern, and Jim Backus, celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles will be holding a special one-night-only showing of the 83-minute film on Thursday, September 24th, 2015 at 7:30 pm.

Actress Cloris Leachman is scheduled to appear at the screening and is due to partake in a post-screening Q & A for a discussion on the making of the film.

From the press release:

Crazy Mama was one of the early movies directed by Oscar winner Jonathan Demme (The Silence of the Lambs, Melvin and Howard, Married to the Mob, Philadelphia, Rachel Getting Married). Produced by Roger and Julie Corman, the film follows three generations of women (played by Cloris Leachman, Ann Sothern as her mother,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Review: 'Masters of Sex' Season 3, Episode 9, 'High Anxiety': Placebo Effects

  • Indiewire
Review: 'Masters of Sex' Season 3, Episode 9, 'High Anxiety': Placebo Effects
Previously: Review: 'Masters of Sex' Season 3, Episode 8 'Surrogates': Replacement Therapies The Syllabus As both the scent study and the surrogacy program confront new hurdles, the latest episode of "Masters of Sex" examines the power of suggestion. Can the belief that one or another treatment is the cure for our ills result in an improved prognosis? At what point does positive thinking cross over from the psychosomatic to the simply delusional? With the verve of this season's strongest episodes if not necessarily the focus, "High Anxiety" finds Bill (Michael Sheen), Virginia (Lizzy Caplan) and the others in their orbit eager -- maybe desperate -- to deceive themselves, provided they reach the desired result. The Powerful Placebo When Dr. Henry K. Beecher published "The Powerful Placebo" in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1955, he framed his recommendations for their use in similar terms,...
See full article at Indiewire »
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