IMDb > Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977)
Exorcist II: The Heretic
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Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
3.7/10   14,222 votes »
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Down 28% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
William Goodhart (written by)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Exorcist II: The Heretic on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 June 1977 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
It's four years later...what does she remember?
Plot:
A girl once possessed by a demon finds that it still lurks within her. Meanwhile, a priest investigates the death of the girl's exorcist. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
A cult film if ever there was one See more (239 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Linda Blair ... Regan MacNeil

Richard Burton ... Father Philip Lamont

Louise Fletcher ... Dr. Gene Tuskin

Max von Sydow ... Father Merrin

Kitty Winn ... Sharon Spencer

Paul Henreid ... The Cardinal

James Earl Jones ... Older Kokumo

Ned Beatty ... Edwards
Belinda Beatty ... Liz (as Belinha Beatty)
Rose Portillo ... Spanish Girl
Barbara Cason ... Mrs. Phalor
Tiffany Kinney ... Deaf Girl
Joey Green ... Young Kokumo
Fiseha Dimetros ... Young Monk
Ken Renard ... Abbot
Hank Garrett ... Conductor
Lorry Goldman ... Accident Victim
Bill Grant ... Taxi Driver
Shane Butterworth ... Gary Tuskin
Joely Adams ... Linda Tuskin
Robert Lussier
Charles Parks

Richard Paul ... Man on the Plane
George Skaff
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Kelley Karel ... Singer (uncredited)
Karen Knapp ... Pazuzu (uncredited)

Dana Plato ... Sandra Phalor (uncredited)

Directed by
John Boorman 
 
Writing credits
William Goodhart (written by)

John Boorman  uncredited
Rospo Pallenberg  uncredited

Produced by
John Boorman .... producer
Richard Lederer .... producer
Charles Orme .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Ennio Morricone 
 
Cinematography by
William A. Fraker 
 
Film Editing by
Tom Priestley 
John Merritt (uncredited)
 
Casting by
Mary Goldberg (uncredited)
Alan Shayne (uncredited)
 
Production Design by
Richard Macdonald 
 
Art Direction by
Jack T. Collis 
 
Set Decoration by
John P. Austin  (as John Austin)
 
Costume Design by
Robert De Mora 
 
Makeup Department
Ron Berkeley .... makeup artist: Mr. Burton
Wayne Edgar .... makeup artist
Lynda Gurasich .... supervising hair stylist
Gary Liddiard .... makeup supervisor
Dick Smith .... special makeup effects artist
Carrie White .... additional hair stylist
Gae Clark Butler .... second hairdresser (uncredited)
Terry Miles .... second makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
John R. Coonan .... unit production manager (as John Coonan)
William C. Gerrity .... unit production manager: New York (as William Gerrity)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Victor Hsu .... second assistant director
Rospo Pallenberg .... second unit director
Phil Rawlins .... assistant director
William S. Beasley .... dga trainee (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Kathrin Boorman .... draughtsman: Regan's drawings
Harold Broner .... construction coordinator
Richard Lawrence .... assistant art director
Richard M. Rubin .... property master
Gene Rudolf .... art director: New York
Glen R. Feldman .... leadman (uncredited)
Douglas Forsmith .... assistant property master (uncredited)
Dean Edward Mitzner .... assistant art director (uncredited)
David Moll .... second assistant property master (uncredited)
Peter R. Romero .... assistant art director (uncredited)
Walter Wylie .... construction coordinator (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Jim Atkinson .... sound effects editor
Les Fresholtz .... sound re-recording mixer
Walter Goss .... sound mixer
Russ Hill .... synchronization effects editor
Michael Minkler .... sound re-recording mixer
Arthur Piantadosi .... sound re-recording mixer
Al Boyle .... boom operator (uncredited)
Collins Shields .... cableman (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Jim Blount .... special effects
Wayne Edgar .... special effects
Chuck Gaspar .... special effects
Jeff Jarvis .... special effects
Roy Kelly .... special effects
Richard Ratliff .... special effects
Wayne Beauchamp .... special effects crew (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Bill Hansard .... process consultant
Albert Whitlock .... special visual effects (as Albert J. Whitlock)
Henry Schoessler .... matte crew (uncredited)
Albert Whitlock .... matte artist (uncredited)
 
Stunts
John Ashby .... stunts (uncredited)
May Boss .... stunts (uncredited)
Whitey Hughes .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
Bennie Moore .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Arthur Brooker .... key grip (as Art Brooker)
Garrett Brown .... Steadicam operator
Diane Eddy .... camera operator: second unit
Ken Eddy .... camera operator: second unit
Nick McLean .... camera operator
Sean Morris .... special photographer: Locust
Doug Pentek .... gaffer
David L. Quaid .... camera operator: second unit (as David Quaid)
Chris Schwiebert .... camera operator
Dave Thompson .... special photographer: Locust
Ron Vargas .... assistant camera
Gerald H. Boatright .... second best boy (uncredited)
Michael B. Corbett .... lighting technician (uncredited)
Ray De La Motte .... first assistant camera (uncredited)
Adam Glick .... set lighting technician (uncredited)
Frank Lambers .... grip best boy (uncredited)
Gary Stark .... set lighting technician (uncredited)
Orlando Suero .... still photographer (uncredited)
Don Yamasaki .... best boy (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Betsy Cox .... costume supervisor
Bruce Walkup .... costume supervisor
Bill Milton .... costumer (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Axel Hubert Sr. .... associate editor (uncredited)
Ron Spang .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Harper MacKay .... choral director
Eugene Marks .... music editor (as Gene Marks)
Ennio Morricone .... conductor
Ennio Morricone .... orchestrator
Dan Wallin .... score mixer
Gloria O'Brien .... singer: theme music (uncredited)
Brandon Quinn .... choral singer (uncredited)
 
Transportation Department
Joe Gary .... transportation co-captain (uncredited)
Richard Padgett .... transportation captain (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Fiseha Dimetros .... technical consultant: Africa
Fisha Dimetros .... technical consultant: Africa
Daniel Joseph Giaghi .... choreographer: tap dance routine
John James .... location manager
Steven R. Kutcher .... entomologist
Andrea Nachman .... production secretary
Rospo Pallenberg .... creative associate
Dan Perri .... title designer
Bonnie Prendergast .... script supervisor
Melissa Skoff .... secretary to director
Kenneth Fineman .... hypnosis consultant (uncredited)
Ardie Ivy .... assistant: AFI (uncredited)
Geri Jacobson .... co-production secretary (uncredited)
Ramon Pahoyo .... craft service (uncredited)
Carol Riggins .... animal trainer (uncredited)
 
Thanks
Tom Culla .... special thanks (as Tommy Culla)
Michael Dryhurst .... special thanks
Peter MacDonald .... special thanks
Geoffrey Unsworth .... special thanks
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"The Exorcist 2" - International (English title) (informal alternative title)
See more »
Runtime:
118 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Linda Blair refused to be subjected to the makeup she wore in the first film. In flashback scenes, the possessed Regan was played by a double.See more »
Goofs:
Audio/visual unsynchronized: When Fr. Lamont is showing Dr. Tuskin the drawing Regan had made of him on fire, Dr. Tuskin says "Where are you going?" but her lips don't move.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
[pre-release version]
Father Lamont:[narrating] Father Lanchester Merrin died in Georgetown near Washington, D.C. while attempting to exorcise a 12-year-old child, Regan MacNeil.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in The Cinema Snob Movie (2012) (V)See more »
Soundtrack:
Lullaby of BroadwaySee more »

FAQ

What happened to Father Karras?
Is "Exorcist II: The Heretic" based on a book?
How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
See more »
57 out of 90 people found the following review useful.
A cult film if ever there was one, 28 August 2000
Author: galensaysyes

I liked this when it came out and I still do. The bad press on it began immediately, and all the reviewers jumped on the bandwagon; only one of the reviews seemed to correlate with what showed on the screen. I think the time was wrong for mysticism, and maybe for religion: the sixties had ended, and the mode of fantasy then in favor was space fantasy, full of technical detail. A couple of decades later, the climate is different: "Stigmata", which has a story not unlike that of "Exorcist II," and looks and feels so much like it that it might almost be the same film with different actors morphed in, didn't get good reviews but wasn't laughed out of theatres either.

Most of the people who like "Exorcist II" tend not to have liked "Exorcist I" much, and vice versa. Blatty himself said in one interview that it didn't work because the director was a Protestant, and in another interview that it was because he wasn't a believer. To me the second film shows more spiritual feeling than the first, but no interest at all in the Church, and maybe in some minds that equates to unreligiousness.

The first "Exorcist" purported to be about possession, but most of its imagery was of a young girl being raped: by her mother's party guests, by doctors, by priests, by a crucifix. "Exorcist II" actually is about possession, among other things, and culminates in the interesting idea (excised after release but later restored on video and DVD) that people who have been possessed and purged of evil can go forth to heal all the others who are similarly afflicted. I happen to think that's an inspiring idea for a story.

But then I like mystical thrillers, and apparently most filmgoers don't--or didn't then. The first "Exorcist" was not one; this is. The images in the first film, when they don't involve repulsive bodily detail, have no metaphysical resonance; they're relentlessly physical, often sexual, and when the demon itself appears, it's in the form of the actual, literal statue. By contrast the images in "Exorcist II" have deliberate metaphysical implications. I doubt that they were worked out thoroughly; it's more as if Boorman were playing with them, in the same way he lets the light play through the stylized sets and behind the actors. The scenes of possession capture the sense of historical accounts of the phenomenon more than those in the first film, which is too much distracted by physical threat and sexual aberration.

Like "Exorcist II" or no, take it seriously or no, I was and am puzzled why more people were unable to enjoy its appeal to the eye and the ear (the music was pretty too), let alone to the imagination. I think perhaps they couldn't allow themselves to enjoy it: that they had to deride it and be seen to deride it because what it said, or the way in which it was said, was something that they had just learned to reject or that contradicted something they had just learned to believe.

It must be admitted that the film is unsatisfactory dramatically. The fantastic incidents of the first film, besides being reduced to the most prosaic physical terms, were fitted within a sequence of conventional, punchy, easily playable scenes; one cared about Ellen Burstyn's problems in a movieish way, and through her Linda Blair's. In the sequel Blair doesn't have the scenes to play, and her inexperience as an actress keeps one from feeling involved with her; Burton is better, but his dialogue doesn't communicate the spiritual dilemma he's undergoing. The excitements of the narrative tend rather to distract from this also. But I found them fun in their own right, and the film as well, apart from the occasional gratuitous shock for shock's sake: fun for the mind and the fancy.

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