IMDb > Death Game (1977)
Death Game
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Death Game (1977) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 5 | slideshow) Videos
Death Game -- A man lets two girls into his house to use the phone. He will regret it when they terrorize him for 48 hours.

Overview

User Rating:
5.2/10   481 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Down 2% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
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View company contact information for Death Game on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
May 1977 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The object is to stay alive. See more »
Plot:
Two young girls come to the home of a businessman whose family is away on his birthday. They seduce him and afterwards... See more » | Add synopsis »
NewsDesk:
(18 articles)
Knock, Knock (2015) review
 (From MoreHorror. 27 January 2016, 9:55 PM, PST)

Knock Knock Movie Review
 (From ShockYa. 18 December 2015, 7:00 AM, PST)

Bluray Review: Knock Knock
 (From Icons of Fright. 15 December 2015, 6:09 PM, PST)

User Reviews:
Not great like it could have been, but an interesting seventies thriller! See more (29 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Sondra Locke ... Jackson

Colleen Camp ... Donna

Seymour Cassel ... George Manning

Beth Brickell ... Karen Manning
Michael Kalmansohn ... Deliveryboy
Ruth Warshawsky ... Mrs. Grossman

Directed by
Peter S. Traynor  (as Peter Traynor)
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Colleen Camp  screenplay (uncredited)
Sondra Locke  screenplay (uncredited)
Anthony Overman 
Michael Ronald Ross 

Produced by
Mel Bergman .... executive producer
William Duffy .... executive producer
John L. Moorehead .... associate producer
Larry Spiegel .... producer
Peter S. Traynor .... producer (as Peter Traynor)
 
Original Music by
Jimmie Haskell 
 
Cinematography by
David Worth 
 
Film Editing by
David Worth 
 
Production Design by
Jack Fisk 
Peter Jamison 
 
Makeup Department
Tino Zacchia .... makeup artist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Chris Christenberry .... assistant director
Wes MacAphee .... assistant director
Leslie Moulton .... second assistant director
 
Art Department
Lowell Cannon .... property master
Eric Edel .... set dresser
Karin Haugse .... set dresser
Dan Martin .... set dresser
Michael Nevler .... set dresser
Bill Paxton .... assistant set decorator
Sissy Spacek .... set dresser
Linda Spheeris .... assistant art director
Janet Stearns .... set dresser
Beth Wasserman .... assistant property master
 
Sound Department
Turner Browne .... boom operator
Leslie Shatz .... sound
Wayne Wahrman .... sound effects editor
Hal Watkins .... head mixer
 
Visual Effects by
James F. Liles .... special optical effects supervisor
Mike Stanwick .... assistant color timer (as Michael Stanwick Jr.)
 
Stunts
Roger Creed .... stunts
Paula Crist .... stunts
Cyndi Swan .... stunts
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Terry Bowen .... first assistant camera
Robert Decker .... key grip (as Bob Decker)
Michael Kalmansohn .... electrician
Urve Kuusik .... still photographer
John LeBlanc .... second assistant camera
John Murray .... gaffer
J. Michael Popovich .... grip (as Mike Popovich)
Lawrence Purcell .... electrician
Scott M. Robinson .... grip (as Scott Robinson)
Peter Smokler .... assistant camera: second unit
Jack Steely .... best boy
Norman Stevens .... electrician
Kurt Young .... electrician
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Todd Joy .... wardrobe
Aaron St. John .... wardrobe
 
Editorial Department
Bob Kaiser .... color timer (as Robert Kaiser)
Patrick McDowell .... assistant editor
Lee Stepansky .... assistant editor
Chris Thiele .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Ron Malo .... scoring mixer
Sid Sharp .... concert master
 
Transportation Department
Frances Reid .... driver
Ken Tara .... driver
 
Other crew
Anthony Albirigi .... authority: Golden Gate Bridge (as Lt. Anthony Albirigi)
Elizabeth Barnard .... assistant to producer (as Liz Bernard)
Robert C. Cawley .... police motor officer (as Robert Cawley)
Carline Davis-Dyer .... script supervisor (as Cariline Davis)
Gini Giblin .... stand-in
Harvey Gibson .... policeman
David Grey .... policeman
Heather Katz .... real estate consultant
Flora Light .... assistant to producer
Mac McCord .... stand-in
Mary Meacham .... title designer
Marcia Mielke .... production coordinator: San Francisco
Alan Myers .... policeman
Gaylene Sagona .... location auditor
Arleen Scalla .... bookkeeper
Carol Shefland .... production secretary
Candace Siller .... assistant to producer
Ken Swerilas .... location auditor
Travis White .... police motor officer
Cathy Zheutlin .... stand-in (as Kathy Zheutlin)
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
91 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:X (original rating) | Argentina:18 (re-rating) | Canada:R (Manitoba/Ontario) | Canada:18+ (Quebec) | Iceland:16 | New Zealand:R18 | Singapore:R21 | USA:R | West Germany:Not Rated (cut)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
According to interview with the movie's lead actress Sandra Locke for a movie podcast called The Projection Booth, the movie was originally suppose to have a more sinister and darker tone and everyone were exciting to do it, but then the original director got replaced as soon as the shoot started and the new director had a different idea of what the movie should look like. This caused serious clashes on the set throughout the whole shoot between the cast and crew and the new director. The crew believed that he didn't understand the story which caused him to often be absent-minded during the shoot. Tensions remained high during the shoot and the cast and crew, led by the cinematographer, took every opportunity to convince the director to let them do their own thing. Seymour Cassel was especially angry at the way the new director was doing things. The two had nasty arguments often and, by the end of the shoot, Cassel almost punched the director in the face. After this incident, Cassel decided to quit the shoot, since his scenes were already completed. After the shoot wrapped, he refused to come back to rerecord some lines, so his character was entirely redubbed. Eventually, due to such toxic atmosphere on the shoot, no one was particularly pleased with the way the movie turned out. The fact that the movie became a cult hit surprised Locke, since she still doesn't like it, which is the main reason why she agreed to support the idea of a remake.See more »
Quotes:
George Manning:You have the manners of an alley cat.See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
We're HomeSee more »

FAQ

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6 out of 7 people found the following review useful.
Not great like it could have been, but an interesting seventies thriller!, 25 February 2007
Author: The_Void from Beverley Hills, England

It's actually a real shame that this film wasn't better, as it features a story line that does a good job of turning the tables on the common exploitation theme of men brutalising women, and it's also quite scary if you put yourself in the position of the lead character! The basic plot revolves around George; a 'happily married' man who picks up two young girls and seduces them at his house. However, after giving him some information that he REALLY didn't want to hear, George finds himself at the girls' mercy. The film has just three central performers, and while many other films work well from this sort of base; this one doesn't, or at least; not really. Director Peter S. Traynor doesn't really have enough ideas to keep the film entertaining throughout; but luckily, The Seducers does have its moments. The majority of the film is suitably sick and twisted, and the two central women are nasty enough to make the film a nightmare for most men. The Seducers is nowhere near as malicious as many similar seventies thrillers; but its decent enough entertainment for fans of this sort of thing. Unfortunately, the stretched plot ultimately lets it down - but it's an interesting film at least, and I somewhat enjoyed it. Just a word of warning, though – you'll have trouble getting the theme song out of your head!

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