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Come Play with Me (1977)

A health-resort where both the clients and the employees easily take their clothes off and have a little fun is the setting of this sex-comedy.
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Lady Bovington
Alfie Bass ...
George Harrison Marks ...
...
Slasher
Ken Parry ...
Podsnap
Toni Harrison Marks ...
Miss Dingle
Tommy Godfrey ...
Blitt
Bob Todd ...
Vicar
Rita Webb ...
Madam Rita
Cardew Robinson ...
McIvar
Sue Longhurst ...
Christina
Henry McGee ...
Deputy Prime Minister
...
Stage Performer
Michael Logan ...
Minister
...
Nosegay
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Storyline

A health-resort where both the clients and the employees easily take their clothes off and have a litte fun is the setting of this hugely popular sex-comedy. Written by Kristian Krokfoss <krokus@online.no>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Entertainingly funny and blushingly saucy. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Musical

Certificate:

See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

28 April 1977 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

David Sullivan's Come Play with Me  »

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Box Office

Budget:

£85,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The producers originally wanted Joanna Lumley,Valerie Leon, and Jane Seymour. All declined. See more »

Goofs

During the climax, Rena is simultaneously seen in the lobby (with clothes on) and downstairs in the sauna (without clothes on). See more »

Connections

Featured in Sex in the 70s: Blue Movies (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

Come Play With Me
By Peter Jeffries
Sung by Coming Shortly
See more »

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User Reviews

Socks on
19 November 2009 | by See all my reviews

It seems like an aeon ago that the likes of Mary Millington and Fiona Richmond were able to cause such uproar with their brand of dingy, don't-scare-the-donkeys soft-porn. Pre-MTV, this was sex the English way: socks on, lights out and trying not to burn holes in the nylon sheets during a giggly post-coital fag.

It all makes you feel tremendously sorry for Britain's dirty mac brigade, shuffling into their sticky-backed cinema seats in Soho in the early 1970s to watch the likes of Millington's Come Play With Me - a god-awful sex-comedy less funny than the average Carry On (who'd set a bawdy precedent) and about as saucy as a bag of ready salted crisps.

John Landis homages such stuff very well for An American Werewolf In London's film-within-a-film 'See You Next Wednesday', in which a pendulous-bosomed fishwife interrupts a spot of rufty to answer the phone.


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