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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2000

1-20 of 46 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


‘Falling Skies’ Series Finale Yields More Fizzle Than Fireworks (Spoilers)

18 hours ago | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Falling Skies” had been running on fumes for a while, frustratingly so in its final season, which should have been building up to a big cosmic comeuppance for the Espheni, the alien invaders who had blown much of humanity to smithereens. Instead, the final episode, after a protracted and sometimes-meandering buildup, had a slightly anticlimactic quality, reinforcing, more than anything, that it was overdue for Chicken Little’s warning to finally come true.

For a time representing one of Steven Spielberg’s more successful recent endeavors as a TV producer, this TNT drama began with some promise, increased its ambition in season two and then began to hit rough patches, such as that whole hybrid-alien-baby-who-ages-ridiculously-fast storyline. The final season, in similar fashion, spent too much time dealing with the show’s various soap opera elements, while taking detours that pitted the humans against each other — most notably Everyman Tom Mason »

- Brian Lowry

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Pattinson to Play E.T. Spaceman in Mystery Sci-Fier for Veteran Auteur Denis

26 August 2015 8:24 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Robert Pattinson: Actor to play E.T. astronaut. Robert Pattinson to star for Claire Denis If all goes as planned, Robert Pattinson will get to star in French screenwriter-director Claire Denis' recently announced – and as yet untitled – English-language sci-fier, penned by Denis and White Teeth author Zadie Smith and her novelist husband Nick Laird, from an original idea by Denis and writing partner Jean-Pol Fargeau. Among Claire Denis' credits are the interracial love story Chocolat (1988), the sociopolitical drama White Material (2009), and the generally well-regarded Billy Budd reboot Beau Travail (1999), winner of the César Award for Best Cinematography (Agnès Godard). Robert Pattinson, for his part, is best known for playing the veggie vampire in the wildly popular Twilight movies costarring Kristen Stewart and Taylor Lautner. Robert Pattinson, astronaut In Claire Denis' film, Robert Pattinson is slated to play an E.T. astronaut. But what happens to said astronaut? Does »

- Zac Gille

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Alamo Drafthouse Is Celebrating Steven Spielberg This Fall with ‘Septemberg’ Screenings

24 August 2015 3:30 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

There’s no doubt that Steven Spielberg is one of the most influential and iconic directors working today. Spielberg has dabbled in everything from war dramas like Saving Private Ryan, historical dramas like The Color Purple, thrillers like Jaws, sci-fi classics like E.T. The Extra Terrestrial, Jurassic Park and Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and […]

The post Alamo Drafthouse Is Celebrating Steven Spielberg This Fall with ‘Septemberg’ Screenings appeared first on /Film. »

- Ethan Anderton

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Weekend Rock Question: What Is the Best Steven Spielberg Movie?

21 August 2015 1:36 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

We're just a couple of months away from the release of Steven Spielberg's Bridge of Spies. The Cold War–era thriller — which stars Tom Hanks, Amy Ryan and Alan Alda — is the first movie directed by Spielberg since Lincoln in 2012. It was written by Ethan and Joel Coen, and early buzz has been quite positive.

Now we have a question for you: What is the best Steven Spielberg movie? We're going to count any film he directed. Feel free to vote for a 1970s classic like Jaws and Close Encounters of the Third Kind, »

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Blu-ray Review “Day For Night” (1973; Directed by François Truffaut) (The Criterion Collection)

13 August 2015 5:44 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

“The Movie For Movie Lovers”

By Raymond Benson

François Truffaut had an all too short but certainly brilliant career as a filmmaker. He began in the world of film criticism in France, but in the late 1950s he decided to make movies himself. Truffaut quickly shot to the forefront of the French New Wave in the late 1950s and early 60s, alongside the likes of Jean-Luc Godard, Eric Rohmer, Alain Resnais, and others. By the time the 70s rolled around, Truffaut was a national treasure in France and a mainstay in art house cinemas in the U.S. and Britain.

His 1973 masterpiece, Day for Night (in France La Nuit Américaine, or “American Night”), won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film of that year, the only time Truffaut picked up an Academy Award. Due to odd eligibility rules, the picture could be nominated for other categories the following year. For »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Lance Henriksen: The Hollywood Interview

10 August 2015 5:30 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Lance Henriksen: A Survivor’s Tale

A seminal event happened to actor Lance Henriksen in his late teens that serves as the perfect metaphor for his life: Henriksen was working at a rural New Mexico gas station, and was taken in by the couple who owned it. They had a teenage daughter a couple years his junior. One day, figuring Lance and his daughter were getting a bit too chummy; the man drove Henriksen out to the middle of the desert. “All winter long, the frost has been pushing up these beautiful amethyst stones,” the man explained. “I’ll drop you off and you can collect them, then come back and sell them for a lot of money.” Henriksen stayed half the night, and then started to succumb to the desert’s freezing temperatures. “I dug a hole and buried myself up to my chest, with a fire in front of me. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Reflections of Evil: Steven Spielberg’s paranoia and conspiracy theories

7 August 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

There are few real-life figures more beloved in American cinema than Steven Spielberg. He’s earned that adoration without question, but his worship retards the dialogue around his work. Like his buddy Colonel G. Lucas, Spielberg is a brand first, a businessman second, and a filmmaker last.

It’s time to loosen up the conversation. Spielberg is less an auteur and more Hollywood’s greatest journeyman, a master craftsman whose natural talent allows him to tackle almost any material. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t common themes that run throughout his work. A lot of breath has been devoted to his sense of wonder and awe, his parent’s divorce, his love of children. But there’s a darker current to his work, one that appears less subtly in thrillers like The Conversation, Three Days of the Condor, and other conspiracy films of the New Hollywood era. It’s a sense of paranoia, »

- Nathan Smith

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Pixels – The Review

23 July 2015 8:51 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Review by Dane Marti

Directed by Chris Columbus, Pixels will definitely take many of us back to an era that once seemed new and exciting, but now appears as old as the Civil War.

Starting with a kid zooming through his neighborhood on bike while Cheap Trick blazes on the soundtrack, I was immediately hooked: The year is 1982. Actually, I hoped that most of the film would take place during this time, an era when many of us were coming of age, but…how silly of me! It’s 2015, and as much as I find recent times to be banal and abrasive, this is the age that modern kids live in. The makers of the movie are obviously hoping for many youthful viewers ‘accompanied by their parental units, of course. I also believe this film should and will make a hefty sum at the box office, as long as kids »

- Movie Geeks

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BBC Culture curates 100 best American films, courtesy of 62 international film critics

22 July 2015 5:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

BBC Culture has this week unveiled a new list of the top 100 American films, as voted for by a pool of international film critics from across the globe. The format of the poll was that any film that would make the list had to have recieved funding from a Us source, and the directors of the films did not need to be from the USA, nor did the films voted for need to be filmed in the Us.

Critics were asked to submit their top 10 lists, which would try to find the top 100 American films that while “not necessarily the most important, but the greatest on an emotional level”. The list, as you may have guessed, is very different to the lists curated by say the BFI or AFI over the years, so there are certainly a few surprises on here, with Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave (2013), Terrence Malick »

- Scott J. Davis

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Scratching our heads at the BBC's top 100 American Movies of All-Time

21 July 2015 5:07 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

First off, let's make one thing clear.  We're not scratching our heads at Spike Lee's "Do The Right Thing" making the BBC's 100 greatest American films.  That movie, of which an image accompanies this post, not only made the list, but ranked appropriately at no. 25.  It's the rest of the selections that have us scratching and, yes, shaking our heads in disbelief. A wonderful page view driver, these sorts of lists make great fodder for passionate movie fans no matter what their age or part of the world they hail from.  There is nothing more entertaining than watching two critics from opposite ends of the globe try to debate whether "The Dark Knight" should have been nominated for best picture or make a list like this.  Even in this age of short form content where Vines, Shapchats and Instagram videos have captured viewers attention, movies will continue to inspire because »

- Gregory Ellwood

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'Citizen Kane' Tops BBC's List of "100 Greatest American Films", Where Does Your Favorite Landc

21 July 2015 11:46 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Leave it to the Brits to compile a list of the best American films of all-time. BBC Culture has published a list of what it calls "The 100 Greatest American Films", as selected by 62 international film critics in order to "get a global perspective on American film." As BBC Culture notes, the critics polled represent a combination of broadcasters, book authors and reviewers at various newspapers and magazines across the world. As for what makes an American filmc "Any movie that received funding from a U.S. source," BBC Culture's publication states, which is to say the terminology was quite loose, but the list contains a majority of the staples you'd expect to see. Citizen Kane -- what elsec -- comes in at #1, and in typical fashion The Godfather follows at #2. Vertigo, which in 2012 topped Sight & Sound's list of the greatest films of all-time, comes in at #3 on BBC Culture's list. »

- Jordan Benesh

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BBC Names 100 Greatest U.S. Films

21 July 2015 9:56 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Every now and then a major publication or news organisation comes up with a top fifty or one hundred films of all time list - a list which always stirs up debate, discussion and often interesting arguments about the justifications of the list's inclusions, ordering and notable exclusions.

Today it's the turn of BBC Culture who consulted sixty-two international film critics including print reviews, bloggers, broadcasters and film academics to come up with what they consider the one-hundred greatest American films of all time. To qualify, the film had to be made by a U.S. studio or mostly funded by American money.

Usually when a list of this type is done it is by institutes or publications within the United States asking American critics their favourites. This time it's non-American critics born outside the culture what they think are the best representations of that culture. Specifically they were asked »

- Garth Franklin

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50 forgotten sci-fi films from the 1990s

16 July 2015 3:25 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We may remember Independence Day, The Matrix, The Phantom Menace. But what about these forgotten 90s sci-fi films? And are any worth seeing?

Think back to the science fiction cinema of the 1990s, and some of the decade's biggest box-office hits will immediately spring to mind: The Phantom Menace, Jurassic Park, Independence Day, Men In Black, Armageddon and Terminator 2 were all in the top 20 most lucrative films of the era.

But what about the sci-fi films of the 1990s that failed to make even close to the same cultural and financial impact of those big hitters? These are the films this list is devoted to - the flops, the straight-to-video releases, the low-budget and critically-derided. We've picked 50 live-action films that fit these criteria, and dug them up to see whether they're still worth watching in the 21st century.

So here's a mix of everything from hidden classics to forgettable dreck, »

- ryanlambie

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TVLine Items: Lewis Black in Madoff, Another Bachelor in Paradise and More

16 June 2015 1:30 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Lewis Black‘s latest TV role is no laughing matter.

The longtime comedian has joined the cast of Madoff, ABC’s upcoming miniseries about former stockbrocker Bernie Madoff.

RelatedBlythe Danner Joins Madoff

Inspired by Brian Ross’ book The Madoff Chronicles, the drama will explore the rise and fall of the disgraced financier, culminating in his 150-year prison sentencing in 2009 for operating a $65 billion Ponzi scheme.

Per The Hollywood Reporter, Black will play Ezra Merkin, who invested with Madoff and brought a number of wealthy Jewish clients into his fold. The comedian joins a cast that includes Close Encounters of the Third Kind »

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Originality Not Quite Dead At Disney Yet: David Oyelowo & Oprah Winfrey to Make 'The Water Man'

11 June 2015 11:18 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

There's no denying Disney took a nasty financial beating with Tomorrowland, and with recent executive decisions, Marvel movies, live-action remakes and Star Wars movies are what we should expect for the long run. And that very well may be, but there's at least one non-established property in the making at the Mouse House. Disney just entered discussions with Oprah Winfrey's Harpo Films and David Oyelowo's Yoruba Saxon to bring to the screen The Water Man, an original fairy tale from first-time writer Emma Needell, based on her spec script. Considered a mix between Stand By Me, E.T. and Close Encounters Of the Third Kind, it's a "magical family drama" centered on Gunner, a precocious young boy who runs away from home to find a mythic figure named The Water Man, rumored to have cheated death, in order to save his dying mother. Oyelowo, in addition to producing, is slated to play Amos, »

- Will Ashton

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36 major blockbusters and why they never got made

11 June 2015 6:53 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We look at the films that slipped through Hollywood's net, from biblical epics to a time travelling Gladiator sequel...

This article contains a spoiler for Gladiator

If you're one of those frustrated over the quality of many of the blockbusters that make it to the inside of a multiplex, then ponder the following. For each of these were supposed to be major projects, that for one reason or another, stalled on their way to the big screen. Some still may make it. But for many others, the journey is over. Here are the big blockbusters that never were...

1. Airframe

The late Michael Crichton scored another residential on the bestseller list with his impressive thriller, Airframe. It was published in 1996, just after films of Crichton works such as Jurassic Park, Rising Sun, Disclosure and the immortal Congo had proven to be hits of various sizes.

So: a hit book, another techno thriller, »

- simonbrew

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You’ve got a T-Rex? Six of the most believable cinematic creations

11 June 2015 5:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

To celebrate the release of Jurassic World, in cinemas now across the globe, I’ve decided to take a trip through 5 of my favourite on-screen creations that have defied the laws of supposed reality. We’re talking those creatures that capture the imagination when they’re first seen but also made you disregard that they weren’t even real.

Let’s begin…

6. Caesar from Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011) (Dir. Rupert Wyatt)

I must admit my movie mind was cautious before the re-launch of another Apes saga but once you see Wyatt’s version that came complete with Andy Serkis’ Imaginarium monkey, sorry Ape, Caesar, then the game was changed forever.

Caesar is an exceptional creation and not just as they’ve given us the believability factor but because it’s done with all the correct intentions. Gone are the days where we know there are humans under the suits, »

- Dan Bullock

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Chinese Film Biz Lures American Talent With Bruce Willis, ‘The Bombing’

10 June 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The growing collaboration between America and China in the film business has been big news for years, but with the recent signing of Bruce Willis and a pair of below-the-line luminaries, the makers of the Chinese-language war epic, “The Bombing,” hope to create more equilibrium in the flow of talent across the Pacific.

Yang Buting, the executive producer of the film and former China Film Group chief executive, believes that the big-budget picture will be the first of many to lure U.S. stars, directors and craftsmen to China. And another producer working in China said that, in the wake of the news that Willis was taking the role in “The Bombing,” two name-brand Hollywood stars inquired about coming to the Far East to work in Chinese-language films.

“It’s coming,” said the producer, who declined to name the American actors prior to the inking of deals. “There is a desire for American talent, »

- James Rainey

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Seth Winston, Oscar Winner and AFI Lecturer, Dies at 64

9 June 2015 6:54 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Seth Winston, an Academy Award winner and long-time senior lecturer with American Film Institute’s Conservatory Studies, died suddenly at his home in Woodland Hills on June 5. He was 64.

Winston received an Oscar for best live action short in 1991 for writing and directing Showtime’s “Session Man.” He also taught at the Columbia College Hollywood, USC School of Cinematic Arts, Uc Santa Barbara and UCLA Extension.

The Philadelphia native grew up in Los Angeles and was a resident of Woodland Hills. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in cinema production from the USC School of Cinema. He wrote and directed two films at USC — “Allegory” and “An Evening with the Gods,” which was seen by CBS executives, who then hired Winston to write a TV comedy pilot based on the film.

Winston was accepted to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Director Internship Program at AFI and »

- Dave McNary

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How Hollywood soundtracks repeat the same old tune

9 June 2015 9:57 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

If you see a movie for the first time and swear you've heard the score before, it may not be your imagination...

Last month, the American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada (Afm) sued six major studios for reusing film soundtracks in other films without paying the appropriate compensation. It's the kind of news that will make people roll their eyes. Ah yes, they'll say after seeing the headlines. Typical Hollywood. Not even the music's original any more.

But go beyond the headlines about reusing the same music too much and delve into the lawsuit and it reveals an interesting insight into the kind of situations where music does get repeated.

The lawsuit, it soon becomes evident, isn't about the use of music in itself (a quick browse through the soundtracks for the titles in question, such as This Means War or Argo, reveals that they have »

- simonbrew

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2000

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