A Bridge Too Far
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4 items from 2016


Haugesund: Liv Ullmann to retire from directing

25 August 2016 12:36 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Norwegian actress and filmmaker announces end to directing on panel with fellow filmmakers Pernilla August and Iram Haq.

Norwegian actress and filmmaker Liv Ullmann, the two-time Oscar nominee and director of films including Cannes competition title Faithless, has announced that she doesn’t plan to direct again.

Ullmann made the announcement during a talk today at Haugesund’s Norwegian International Film Festival.

“I don’t want to direct anymore,” she said during the festival’s annual public talk, The Amanda Conversation.

“I want to use my strength to act in a film - there I can use it with a sensitive director, and write. I took that decision right now,” the 77-year-old veteran said with a smile.

As an actress, she is hoping to work with Anthony Hopkins in 2017 on an as yet unannounced film. The duo previously worked together on 1977 feature A Bridge Too Far.

Challenges

This year’s Amanda Conversation was between Ullmann, whose most recent »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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Drive-In Dust Offs: Magic (1978)

14 May 2016 11:25 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

It’s the eyes, isn’t it? Wide like saucers and twice as deep, they’re impenetrable. And the wooden leer of the wide open maw betrays them, separate and with its own agenda. Of course I’m referring to ventriloquist dummies, and the eerie spell they cast upon the viewer. The horror viewer, specifically; we’ll seek out anything that gives us a sense of unease. Which brings us to Richard Attenborough’s Magic (1978), a wryly creepy tale of encroaching madness and showbiz folly. (Aren’t they the same thing?)

Produced by 20th Century Fox and Joseph E. Levine (Carnal Knowledge) and released by 20th Century, Magic opened in November of ’78 in the U.S. and rolled out to the rest of the world in early ’79. Grossing nearly $24 million U.S. against a $7 million budget with positive reviews to boot, Magic was an unqualified success – with one of the »

- Scott Drebit

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Co-Stars Who Should Have Worked Together More Than Once

9 April 2016 5:24 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Sometimes actors are cast in a movie together and instantly display great onscreen chemistry. You look at them and think, “These two should work together again. They make a good team.” Sometimes they do reunite and it leads to a series of great screen collaborations, but sometimes they don’t and we’re left wishing the pair would have made more films together.

 Back in the days of the old ‘Studio System,’ movies studio execs would look for actors who had good on-screen chemistry and repeatedly cast them together in films. This was called “packaging”, and it lead to the frequent teaming of people like Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers; William Powell & Myrna Loy; Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall; Boris Karloff & Bela Lugosi; Bob Hope & Bing Crosby; Errol Flynn & Olivia de Havilland; Nelson Eddy & Jeannette MacDonald; etc., etc.

 The ‘Studio System’ is long gone and so is “packaging”. It’s a pity »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Antony Gibbs, Editor of ‘Dune,’ ‘Fiddler on the Roof,’ Dies at 90

2 March 2016 11:11 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Antony Gibbs, a British-born film editor who cut dozens of pictures, including such ’60s classics as “Tom Jones” as well as “Fiddler on the Roof,” “Rollerball,” “Dune” and “Ronin,” died February 26. He was 90.

The Guild of British Film and Television Editors reported his death on Facebook.

Gibbs was nominated for four of the American Cinema Editors’ Eddie Awards, including for “Tom Jones” in 1964 and “Fiddler on the Roof” in 1972. He won Eddies in 1998 for his work on John Frankenheimer’s TNT miniseries “George Wallace,” starring Gary Sinise, and in 2002 for his editing of Mark Rydell’s TNT TV movie “James Dean,” starring James Franco (a film for which he also picked up an Emmy nomination). Also in 2002, he received an Ace career achievement award.

The Ace said of Gibbs in 2002: “With ‘Reindeer Games’  he continued his successful collaboration with John Frankenheimer, but his friend director Mark Rydell allowed Tony to »

- Carmel Dagan

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4 items from 2016


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