6.5/10
186
8 user 3 critic

Alexander: The Other Side of Dawn (1977)

A teenaged boy arrives in Hollywood to become a movie star, but winds up becoming a male prostitute and gets involved with a gay football star.

Director:

Writers:

(teleplay), (story) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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...
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Myra
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Landlady
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Eddie Duncan (as Lonnie Chapman)
Asher Brauner ...
Buddy
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Clara Duncan
Fred Sadoff ...
Mr. Anderson
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Judge White
John Devlin
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Herself (as Miss Frances Faye)
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Charles Selby
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Ray Church
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Jack
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Ms. Mathias
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Storyline

A teenaged boy arrives in Hollywood to become a movie star, but winds up becoming a male prostitute and gets involved with a gay football star.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 May 1977 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Aamunkajon tuolla puolen  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jean Hagen's final performance. See more »

Connections

Follows Dawn: Portrait of a Teenage Runaway (1976) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Post-"Midnight Cowboy" hustling; commendable exploits for '70s television...
4 March 2008 | by (las vegas, nv) – See all my reviews

Shy, straight kid from Oklahoma who likes to draw and paint gets thrown out of his house, soon ending up in Los Angeles where he romances a pretty young prostitute while paying the bills as a male escort to women and men. Worthy TV-made continuation of the 1976 ratings blockbuster "Dawn: Portrait of a Teenage Runaway" wasn't as big a success, partly due to a been-there-done-that feel but also perhaps because of the gay content--uncomfortable territory for 1977. The filmmakers work very hard to show us that Alexander (deep-voiced Leigh McCloskey, looking too old to be a minor) is indeed heterosexual; with lots of lip-locking between he and Dawn (returning Eve Plumb), we get the point early he's just using the gays as trade without all the speech-making. Alexander ends up living with a gay football player, who's just another stepping stone to this kid and one who seems to understand the situation (he quickly picks up another boy, though he isn't made out to be a villain). Earl Holliman gives probably the strongest performance in the movie, playing a (presumably gay) community center counselor who wants to clean up the streets--and Alex's life. John Erman directs in an unembarrassed, straightforward fashion, admirable for what is basically low-budget, exploitation television. The film refuses to paint the characters in shades of black or white, good guys or bad guys. Though the pseudo-happy ending doesn't quite ring true, and McCloskey's slack-jawed performance is disappointing, it's a decent attempt to scare impressionable kids away from Hollywood Boulevard.


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