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Lou Grant (TV Series 1977–1982) Poster

(1977–1982)

Trivia

When the series aired on CBS on Monday nights, journalism classes would dismiss early, so that the faculty and students could watch the new episodes and discuss them in class.
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The producers of the show wanted to air a final episode that dealt with the paper going out of business. They actually interviewed reporters from real newspapers that closed in order to prepare for this episode. The show was taken off the air before that episode could be filmed.
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During the run of the show, the reporters switched from using typewriters to VDTs (video display terminals). The brand name was taped over on all of the computers.
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A spinoff of the sitcom Mary Tyler Moore (1970), this is one of the only dramatic series in American TV history to originate from a comedy series.
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During the primetime run of the show (1977-1982), Edward Asner became increasingly vocal on behalf of various liberal political causes. Although the series had slipped in ratings by 1982, many critics speculated that the actor's politics played a major role in the show's cancellation.
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One of the influences on the show was the film All the President's Men (1976). Actor Robert Walden appeared in both projects.
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The show Room 222 (1969) takes place at the fictional Walt Whitman High School. The old building at Los Angeles High School, which was used for the exterior of Walt Whitman High, collapsed in the 1971 earthquake. The new building on that spot was used as the exterior for Whitman High in this series.
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The Trib uncovered numerous scandals in the small city of Newton, California. Newton is the name of an LAPD district, but there is no city of Newton, California.
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Mrs. Pynchon, the widowed owner of the fictional Los Angeles Tribune, was based on Katherine Graham, the real widowed owner of the Washington Post, and on Dolly Schiff.
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When CBS canceled the series in 1982, NBC considered picking it up, but ultimately decided against it. Grant Tinker, who was chairman of NBC at the time, later commented that the reason the network passed on the show was because they judged it as "a little tired".
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