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1-20 of 31 items from 2013   « Prev | Next »


Danny Wells, Luigi on ‘Super Mario Bros.’ Show, Dies at 72

4 December 2013 5:28 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Danny Wells, an actor with dozens of TV credits dating back to “Love, American Style” but best known for playing Luigi on “The Super Mario Bros. Super Show!,” died Nov. 28 in Toronto. He was 72.

The syndicated “Super Mario Bros.” show, based on the popular Nintendo videogame franchise, aired from 1989-91. Lou Albano played Mario and Wells his brother Luigi.

Wells recurred on “The Jeffersons” as Charlie the bartender, and he played studio boss Jack L. Warner in the 2002 telepic “Gleason,” which starred Brad Garrett as the comedian.

His vast number of television credits also included appearances on “Rhoda,” “Columbo,” “Starsky and Hutch,” “Kojak,” “Sanford and Son,” “The Bionic Woman,” “Fantasy Island,” “Eight Is Enough,” “Lou Grant,” “Happy Days,” “The A-Team” and “Murder She Wrote.”

He also appeared in feature films including “Magnolia,” “Gus,” “The Shaggy D.A.,” “Private Benjamin,” “Body and Soul” and “Protection.”

Wells also did a number of TV »

- Variety Staff

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Al Ruscio, Character Actor and Acting Teacher, Dies at 89

14 November 2013 7:09 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Al Ruscio, a film, television and stage actor who was also a noted acting teacher and served on the board of directors of the Screen Actors Guild, died in his home on Nov. 12. He was 89.

Ruscio was already an accomplished actor by the time he arrived in Hollywood, soon after which he starred in “A View From the Bridge” at the Players Ring Theater. He also began to play major guest roles on series including “Bonanza,” “Mr. Lucky,” “The Untouchables” and “Playhouse 90,” and he appeared in the film “Al Capone” with Rod Steiger.

During this time, he was serving on SAG’s board of directors. He began touring in George Bernard Shaw’s “Don Juan in Hell,” playing the role of the Devil.

Ruscio’s career took a bit of a left turn at this point as he became actor-in-residence, chairman of the theater department and managing director of »

- Variety Staff

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Al Ruscio, Character Actor and Acting Teacher, Dies at 89

14 November 2013 7:09 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Al Ruscio, a film, television and stage actor who was also a noted acting teacher and served on the board of directors of the Screen Actors Guild, died in his home on Nov. 12. He was 89.

Ruscio was already an accomplished actor by the time he arrived in Hollywood, soon after which he starred in “A View From the Bridge” at the Players Ring Theater. He also began to play major guest roles on series including “Bonanza,” “Mr. Lucky,” “The Untouchables” and “Playhouse 90,” and he appeared in the film “Al Capone” with Rod Steiger.

During this time, he was serving on SAG’s board of directors. He began touring in George Bernard Shaw’s “Don Juan in Hell,” playing the role of the Devil.

Ruscio’s career took a bit of a left turn at this point as he became actor-in-residence, chairman of the theater department and managing director of »

- Variety Staff

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'Simon & Simon' star Mary Carver dies at 89

27 October 2013 2:56 PM, PDT | Pop2it | See recent Pop2it news »

Veteran actor Mary Carver died Oct. 18 following a brief illness, The Hollywood Reporter reports. She was 89, and is survived by her daughters Lia and Athena.

Best known for playing the mother of the two private-detective brothers on the long-running CBS series "Simon & Simon," Carver was in over 150 episodes of the series from 1981-1989.

Carver's acting career spanned more than 60 years. She played the mother of Goldie Hawn in "Protocol" in 1984, and the mother of James Woods in "Best Seller" in 1987. In 1990's "Arachnophobia," her character was one of many who died from a spider bite.

Carver's other TV roles included: "The Donna Reed Show," "The Twilight Zone," "Gunsmoke," "The Man From U.N.C.L.E.," "Mannix," "McCloud," "Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman," "Lou Grant," "Quincy, M.E.," "E.R.," and "Star Trek: Enterprise." »

- editorial@zap2it.com

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Greatest Series Finales: The Mary Tyler Moore Show Ep. 7.24 “The Last Show” sees Mary’s journey at Wjm-tv come full circle

1 October 2013 11:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Mary Tyler Moore Show Season 7, Episode 24: “The Last Show”

Written by James L. Brooks, Allan Burns, Ed Weinberger, Stan Daniels, David Lloyd & Bob Ellison

Directed by Jay Sandrich

Original Airdate: March 19, 1977 on CBS

The Mary Tyler Moore Show began in 1970 on the CBS network. The show, itself, was ground breaking. It centered on a single woman who had just went through a bad breakup and was trying to make a name for herself. And she accomplished that throughout the seven years that the show was on the air.

In the first episode we were introduced to Mary Richards who had just moved to Minneapolis and was going to start work at the local news station. Since the show began right at the beginning of the seventies the nation was still dealing with women in the workforce. We see elements of this throughout that episode; Mr. Grant seems reluctant »

- Joshua Bouye

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Ed Asner Joins Joseph Fiennes and Tom Cavanagh 'The Games Maker' (Exclusive)

30 July 2013 9:45 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Ed Asner, the Emmy-winning star of "Lou Grant" and "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," has officially joined the cast of "The Games Maker," his publicist told TheWrap. "The Games Maker" centers on a young boy whose love of board games catapults him into a fantastical world and pits him against an evil inventor. Asner will play the grandfather of the film's young protagonist (David Mazouz).  The cast also includes Joseph Fiennes ("Shakespeare in Love") and Tom Cavanagh (TV's "Ed"). Disney has the rights to distribute the film in the United States and »

- Brent Lang

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R.I.P. Paul Jenkins

2 July 2013 8:53 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Actor Paul Jenkins, best remembered as Professor Parks on The Waltons and Eddie on Dynasty died after a short illness yesterday. He was 74. Jenkins made his film debut in 1968 in Rosemary’s Baby. He also appeared in Chinatown, I Never Promised You A Rose Garden and Primary Colors, but it was in television that he spent of his decades-long career. His small screen credits include MashThe Rockford Files, The Streets Of San Francisco, Barney Miller, Law And Order, Starsky And Hutch, Lou Grant and most recently The West Wing and Cold Case. Jenkins also toured with Brock Peters in The Great White Hope and starred in the 1970 San Francisco revival of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest. »

- THE DEADLINE TEAM

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The secret of Birds of a Feather: female friendship is the key to sitcom success

29 June 2013 4:04 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

ITV's revival is a reminder of how central women's friendships are to most classic comedy shows

Rock bands go on for ever, it seems. And even when they break up, they re-form later. So perhaps popular sitcoms should have the same leeway. News last week that Birds of a Feather, the BBC show that first standardised the Essex brand across Britain, will be back on television screens with its original female cast implies that, as the age of pensionable retirement recedes, so the sell-by date on comic scenarios has lengthened too.

Birds of a Feather ran for nine series between 1989 and Christmas 1998 and told the story of two sisters, Sharon and Tracey, played by Pauline Quirke and Laura Robson, both married to imprisoned bank robbers and living in Chigwell. Diverting them from their squabbles was their neighbour, the libidinous and aspirational Dorien, played by Lesley Joseph. Written by Laurence Marks and Maurice Gran, »

- Vanessa Thorpe

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Gary David Goldberg Channeled the Colorful Experience of Growing Up a Brooklyn Jew - an Appreciation

24 June 2013 2:25 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

What a shock to hear that Gary David Goldberg died Sunday as I planned to send him birthday greetings on Tuesday. Although Goldberg was most famous for producing and writing such wonderful television shows as "Family Ties," "Lou Grant" and "Spin City," I was most enamored with him for his short-lived and semi-autobiographical "Brooklyn Bridge" television show.  Set in the Brooklyn of yesteryear -- totally unlike the present day hipster version depicted in "Girls" -- the show showed the mid-1950s New York borough populated by Jewish and Irish immigrants who still »

- Aviva Kempner

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Gary David Goldberg, Family Ties Creator, Dies at 68

24 June 2013 1:45 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Gary David Goldberg, who created the 1980s sitcom hit Family Ties and expanded into feature films, has died. Goldberg died of brain cancer in Montecito, Calif., on Saturday, days before his 69th birthday, The New York Times reported. Goldberg's TV successes also included the ABC comedy Spin City, which in 1996 reunited him with Family Ties breakout star Michael J. Fox as the deputy mayor of New York City. "With a full heart I say goodbye to my mentor, benefactor, partner, second father and beloved friend," Fox said in a statement on Monday. "He touched so many with his enormous talent and generous spirit. »

- Associated Press

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Michael J. Fox remembers 'Family Ties' creator Gary David Goldberg

24 June 2013 12:43 PM, PDT | EW - Inside TV | See recent EW.com - Inside TV news »

Gary David Goldberg, the Emmy-winning creator of Family Ties and Spin City, died Sunday at age 68. After working on the writing staffs of Lou Grant, The Tony Randall Show, and The Bob Newhart Show, Goldberg created Family Ties, starring Michael J. Fox, in 1982.

In a statement to EW about Goldberg’s death, Fox said, “With a full heart I say goodbye to my mentor, benefactor, partner, second father and beloved friend, Gary David Goldberg. He touched so many with his enormous talent and generous spirit.  He changed my life profoundly. Love to Diana and all of Gary’s family.”

Read more:

Gary David Goldberg, »

- Erin Strecker

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Family Ties, Spin City: Gary David Goldberg Dies

24 June 2013 11:58 AM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

The creator of Family Ties, Gary David Goldberg, has died following a long battle with brain cancer. He passed away this morning at his home in Montecito, just two days short of his 69th birthday.

Goldberg began working in television in the early 1970s and in 1976, at the age of 32, became a writer on The Bob Newhart Show. He went on to write for many other legendary shows like Lou Grant, Alice, Phyllis, The Tony Randall Show, and M*A*S*H.

In addition to Family Ties, Goldberg created shows like Brooklyn Bridge and The Bronx Zoo, and co-created Spin City.

Family Ties ended after seven seasons and 176 episodes. The show had lost a lot of steam but 36.3 million viewers tuned in to watch the finale.

He is survived by his wife of 43 years and »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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Gary David Goldberg, creator of 'Family Ties,' dies

24 June 2013 6:46 AM, PDT | EW - Inside TV | See recent EW.com - Inside TV news »

Gary David Goldberg, the Emmy-winning creator of Family Ties and Spin City, died yesterday in Montecito, Calif. He was 68. Goldberg was an experienced TV writer of 1970s programs like Lou Grant, The Tony Randall Show, and The Bob Newhart Show when he built Family Ties in 1982 for NBC, basing the idealistic hippie parents played by Michael Gross and Meredith Baxter on himself and his wife, Dr. Diana Meehan. The show became an essential part of the network’s Thursday-night lineup — pairing with The Cosby Show for a time as TV’s two biggest shows — and made Michael J. Fox a huge star. »

- Jeff Labrecque

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Family Ties Creator Gary David Goldberg Dead at 68

24 June 2013 6:45 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Longtime television producer Gary David Goldberg, best known for creating Family Ties, died of brain cancer in California yesterday, according to several outlets. He was 68. Goldberg got his start on the short-lived Norman Lear sitcom The Dumplings in 1976 and went on to write for Alice, The Bob Newhart Show, The Tony Randall Show, M*A*S*H*, and Lou Grant, among others. In 1982, he created the megahit and cultural touchstone Family Ties, which ran for seven seasons, and in 1991 he launched the critically beloved, largely autobiographical series Brooklyn Bridge. Then, in 1996, Goldberg co-created a second Michael J. Fox hit with Spin City.Goldberg won his first Emmy in 1979, for Lou Grant, and his second in 1987, for Family Ties, and he picked up five other nominations along the way. He won two Humanitas prizes and both Producers Guild and Writers Guild awards. If you watched a lot of »

- Margaret Lyons

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Family Ties Creator Gary David Goldberg Dies

24 June 2013 5:44 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Gary David Goldberg, the Emmy-winning creator of Family Ties, died Sunday after a long battle with brain cancer. He was 68.

Goldberg, who passed away two days shy of his 69th birthday at his home in Montecito, CA, launched Family Ties on NBC in 1982. The comedy made a star of Michael J. Fox and served as a staple of the Peacock’s Thursday lineup for nearly a decade.

He later reunited with Fox on ABC’s Spin City (which he co-created with Bill Lawrence). He also created the acclaimed semi-autobiographical half-hour dramedy Brooklyn Bridge, which ran for two seasons on CBS. »

- Michael Ausiello

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Gary David Goldberg, Creator of Family Ties, Dies at 68

24 June 2013 5:26 AM, PDT | TVGuide - Breaking News | See recent TVGuide - Breaking News news »

Gary David Goldberg, the creator of the classic sitcom Family Ties, has died, according to Variety. He was 68.

Goldberg died in Montecito, Calif. after a battle with brain cancer.

Born in Brooklyn, Goldberg began his television writing career in the '70s working on qsuch shows as The Bob Newhart Show, The Last Resort and Lou Grant, the latter of which earned him his first Emmy. 

Read More > »

- Robyn Ross

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Must Love Dogs Director and Family Ties Creator Gary David Goldberg Dead at 68

24 June 2013 3:42 AM, PDT | WorstPreviews.com | See recent Worst Previews news »

Gary David Goldberg, the creator of "Family Ties" and Spin City" shows, passed away on Saturday from cancer at his home in Montecito, California. He was 68-years old. Goldberg got his start in Hollywood by writing for "The Tony Randall Show," "The Bob Newhart Show," "Mash," and "Lou Grant," winning the first of his two Emmys. Then in 1982, his "Family Ties" show premiered, becoming a big his for Fox, averaging 28 million viewers per week and lasting for 180 episodes. The sitcom starred Michael J. Fox. In 1991, Goldberg returned with "Brooklyn Bridge" and then re-teamed with Michael J. Fox for "Spin City" in 1996. All his shows were produced through his Ubu Productions company that's recognized by a shot of Goldberg's dog and him saying "Sit, Ubu. Sit. Good dog." Goldberg also directed several theatrical releases, including 1989's "Dad," with Jack Lemmon and Ted Danson, and 2005's "Must Love Dogs," with John Cusack and Diane Lane. »

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Gary David Goldberg, 'Family Ties' and 'Spin City' creator, dies at 68

23 June 2013 11:48 PM, PDT | Zap2It - From Inside the Box | See recent Zap2It - From Inside the Box news »

Gary David Goldberg, an Emmy-winning TV writer and producer who created "Family Ties" and other series, has died.

Goldberg died Sunday (June 23) at his home in Montecito, Calif., near Santa Barbara, after fighting brain cancer. He would have turned 69 years old on Tuesday.

Goldberg began his TV writing career in the mid-1970s with scripts for "The Bob Newhart Show," "Alice" and "Phyllis." He won his first Emmy in 1979 as a producer of "Lou Grant," which took home the award for best drama series that year.

Three years later, "Family Ties" -- based in part on his own life and in part on those of friends -- premiered on NBC and made a star of Michael J. Fox. After moving behind "The Cosby Show" in 1984-85, it ranked in the Top 5 of the ratings for three straight seasons, peaking at better than 28 million viewers in Season 5. Goldberg won a writing »

- editorial@zap2it.com

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Gary David Goldberg, 'Family Ties' Creator, Dead at 68

23 June 2013 11:31 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Gary David Goldberg, creator of the 1980s NBC sitcom "Family Ties," died Sunday following a battle with brain cancer, according to media reports. He was 68. Born in Brooklyn, Goldberg began writing his career as a writer working for "The Bob Newhart Show," moving on to "The Tony Randall Show" and "Lou Grant," serving as writer and producer on both series. After founding his own production company Ubu Productions (named after his dog, and featuring the line "Sit, Ubu, sit" in the closing credits for its shows; see video below), Goldberg created »

- Tim Kenneally

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'Family Ties' creator, 'Must Love Dogs' director Gary David Goldberg dies at 68

23 June 2013 10:59 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

"Family Ties" creator Gary David Goldberg, a two-time Emmy winner, died on Saturday (June 23) at his home in Montecito, California.   According to media reports, the 68-year-old Goldberg died of cancer.    Goldberg got his start in Hollywood writing and producing on "The Tony Randall Show" and "Lou Grant," winning the first of his Emmys for that Ed Asner vehicle.   "Family Ties," which premiered in 1982, starred Michael J. Fox, Meredith Baxter-Birney, Michael Gross and Tina Yothers. The generation gap comedy developed into both a popular success, boosted by a pairing with "The Cosby Show" in 1984, and an »

- Daniel Fienberg

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