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That's Entertainment, Part II (1976) Poster

Trivia

One of only two films in which Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly danced together. The other was Ziegfeld Follies (1945).
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During the clip from Kiss Me Kate (1953), Gene Kelly identifies 'Ann Miller & Company,' without giving the names of the other dancers. A few moments later, Fred Astaire identifies Bob Fosse and Carol Haney. Bobby Van, Tommy Rall and Jeanne Coyne remain unidentified.
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When introducing a clip of Cyd Charisse early in the film Fred Astaire says "Cyd Charisse. Lovely Cyd Charisse. How she dances." A little later Gene Kelly says exactly the same line when introducing another clip of her.
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This was Fred Astaire's final dance performance on film.
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It was Fred Astaire's idea that he and Gene Kelly perform together in a new dance number in the film. Astaire was afraid that if he and Kelly just stood around and talked to each other, the audience would think they were too old to dance any more. At the time, Astaire was in his late 70s and Kelly was in his mid 60s.
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Because the "Merry Widow Waltz" never comes to a musical conclusion in The Merry Widow (1934), the final thirty-two bars of the sequence as presented in That's Entertainment, Part 2 are actually borrowed from MGM's 1952 remake of The Merry Widow, while the visuals accompanying them remain from the 1934 version.
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In the "Shubert Alley" section of the film, Astaire and Kelly dance together past marquees with famous song titles on them as a means of introducing the next selection of film clips. However, some of these song titles do not appear: "Moses Supposes" was supplanted by "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas;" "Drum Crazy" was cut in favor of "Steppin' Out With My Baby;" "The Stanley Steamer" was ultimately deleted in favor of "I Got Rhythm." None of the replacement songs are featured in marquees in the introductory sequence.
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Based on the film's art direction, it is relatively easy to detect which songs were dropped from the final release print. "You Stepped Out of a Dream" from Ziegfeld Girl (1941) was clearly intended to be part of the opening sequence, as it is the only one of the rotating photo stills in Astaire and Kelly's dance routine that never materializes on the screen. Two other numbers went so far as to be listed in the films's souvenir program before being cut from the general release print. "Lonesome Polecat" from Seven Brides For Seven Brothers (1954) was situated between "All of You" and "The Lady is a Tramp" in the Great Songwriters sequence. Oscar Levant's rendition of "Concerto in F" from An American in Paris (1951) was slated to appear between "Triplets" and "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas; in fact, the editing out of Levant's solo was executed so last-minute that one can still hear his final cry of "Bravo!" sound-mixed with the first notes of Judy Garland's song.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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