Sybil (1976)

TV Mini-Series  -   -  Biography | Drama
8.0
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A young woman whose childhood was so harrowing to her that she developed at least 13 different personalities.

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Title: Sybil (1976– )

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Episodes

Seasons


Years



1  
1976  
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 4 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 Sybil (2 episodes, 1976)
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Storyline

The story tells of a young woman admitting to have blackouts, fearing they are getting worse. She is believed to suffer from multiple personalities, as a result of severe abuse at the hands of her mother, whom the psychiatrist, Cornelia B. Wilbur, believes was schizophrenic. The movie Sibyl is based upon author Flora Rheta Schreiberthe's novel and fictionalized version of the life story of Shirley Ardell Mason, an American psychiatric patient, claimed to have suffered multiple personality disorder. The novel Sibyl, was in it's turn based largely on the alleged actual accounts of psychiatric treatment that Shirley Ardell Mason underwent, documented by American psychiatrist Cornelia B. Wilbur. Numerous psychiatrists, both contemporary and more recent, have strongly contested the diagnosis. Written by Jim Berg

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Biography | Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

14 November 1976 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Sybil - en verklig mardröm  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(original television) | (theatrical) | (DVD)

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Patty Duke auditioned for the lead role, although was not cast due to a clash with the original director. Daniel Petrie later signed on to direct, but Sally Field already accepted the role. See more »

Goofs

In present day scenes (set in mid Seventies), Sybil appears to be in anywhere from 25-to-30 years old. But in flashbacks to her childhood scenes when she around five (which would be either late 1940's or early-mid 50's), everything (cars, fashions, hair, etc.) appears to be set in 1930's - long before she was even born. See more »

Quotes

Richard J. Loomis: Yeah, love and hate; peanut butter and jelly. I used to hate my late wife, who I speak of with a certain irony so as to keep total collapse at a distance.
[pause]
Sybil Dorsett: I... wish you wouldn't mock yourself.
Richard J. Loomis: You wanna hear about it?
[pause]
Richard J. Loomis: 'cause I'd like to tell you.
Sybil Dorsett: You would? I'd like to hear; I just didn't think I should ask.
[pause]
Richard J. Loomis: Beep, beep with the horn; choo, choo with the train; crash, crash with the car. 'All broke', as Matthew says when I drop a dish.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Saturday Night Live: Dick Cavett/Ry Cooder (1976) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Vivid, unsettling true story given enormous stature by Joanne Woodward and Emmy-winning Sally Field.

How does one survive, much less overcome, long-standing child abuse? Newscasts are littered with the more unusual, horrific stories - children imprisoned in closets or chained to beds with little more than food or water; tiny children dying in hot, sweltering autos or stuffed into car trunks while a parent works. In yesterday's paper alone, an archbishop of a progressive church was charged with the strangulation of a 15-year-old girl he sexually assaulted for years, while on the opposite page a woman and her boyfriend were charged with beating two of her children with a metal pipe, their battered bodies bearing the marks of years of abuse. How does a child get through this WHILE IT IS HAPPENING? Somehow, some way they MUST build up some sort of mental toughness or defense mechanism to combat the agony and fear - either by tuning out or systematically shutting down -- going into deep states of denial and emotional withdrawal. And then there is Sybil Dorsett...

Sally Field is unforgettable as the titular victim of incessant child abuse, a woman who dissolved into SIXTEEN separate and distinct personalities in order to cope with a mother who inflicted indescribable childhood tortures. She is nothing short of amazing, especially in her "dissociative" scenes as she morphs with lightning speed into one or more of her "inner family" -- a combative, self-assertive Peggy Lou, a mothering but suicidal Mary, a vivacious, ambitious Vicky, a frightened, thumb-sucking Sybil Ann, or even an athletically-inclined Mike. All of them personalities created and programmed unconsciously by Sybil to endure any situation she herself couldn't handle, and triggered by almost anything -- a hostile argument, piano music, certain colors, street sounds, even a word.

What is incredible about Field's performance as Sybil (not her real name) is the ability to tear down her own barriers to such an extent that she can revert into a flood of strange babblings or shockingly infantile behavior at the drop of a hat. It is such a compelling and all-consuming feat that these scenes come off almost improvisatory in style. One particular marvel of a scene has Sybil's psychologist discovering her patient, an artist by nature, lodged under a piano taken over by one of her more immature personalities, tormented by thunderous sounds of Dvorak and Beethoven, illustrating her torment on paper with brightly-colored crayons. It is to director Daniel Petrie's credit that he was able to create such a safe environment for Field to let herself go like this. With "Sybil," Field, who won an Emmy, forever dispelled any theories that she was a one-note actress trapped with a Gidget-like cuteness.

In an ironic bit of casting, Joanne Woodward essays the role of Sybil's psychologist, Dr. Cornelia Wilbur, who finally pinpoints Sybil's mental disability and starts her on the long, arduous journey of putting the "selves" back together. Woodward won an Academy Award decades earlier as a similar victim of MPD (multiple personality disorder) in a curious but ultimately heavy-handed and very dated film "The Three Faces of Eve." Woodward is superb here as a professional clearly out of her element but determined to find a light at the end of the tunnel for this poor, unfortunate girl.

The late Brad Davis, as an unsuspecting acquaintance who wants to get to know Sybil better, adds a tender, sympathetic chapter to Sybil's turbulent life, while William Prince and Jane Hoffman are compelling as Sybil's bloodless father and stepmother who offer puzzling, ignorant explanations to Sybil's "problem." Charles Lane has a significant scene as Sybil's small-town doctor (as a child) who failed to report his examination findings, and little Natasha Ryan, in flashback sequences, must be commended for reenacting the more harrowing details of Sybil's childhood torment. Jessamine Milner as Sybil's grandmother has a few affecting moments as a doting grandma who offers Sybil brief moments of respite.

However, the most chilling portrait of evil you'll ever witness on TV goes hands down to stocky, harsh-looking Martine Bartlett as Sybil's monster of a mother. She lends horrifying believability to the fragmented, unbalanced woman who gets sadistic pleasure out of her routine torturous acts. Bartlett, a respected stage actress little seen on film, was known for another bizarre but fascinating screen role as a crazy, self-abusing mental patient in "I Never Promised You a Rose Garden." As Hattie Dorsett, she displays subtle, calculating menace, which makes her even more terrifying, as she devises a number of "games" to inflict on her only child. Some of these scenes are extremely repelling and graphic in nature, but it is all handled as responsibly as possible, considering the actual incidents DID occur.

Hopefully seeing this dark, disturbing, but ultimately important TV-movie will inspire you to read Flora Rheta Schreiber's best selling book, which details Sybil's childhood, blackout episodes (the real Sybil once woke up finding out she had missed the entire sixth grade(!), therapy sessions, the battle of alter-egos for control of Sybil, and the subsequent unifying process, through the professional vantage point of Dr. Wilbur and with more depth. Trust me, you won't be able to put it down and you'll never question the boundaries and/or consequences of child abuse again.

WARNING - Don't rent the confusing, chopped-up two-hour version, also available on tape. This was a two-part, over three-hour long drama when initially shown and THIS version is what rates a "10."


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Does the book explain why her mother abused her and disliked her? katejane10
Why did Sybil's mom lay her on the kitchen table with her legs up? katejane10
Why do people who don't deserve children have them? katejane10
=] kinda stupid.. Trixiet23
Kitchen Scene XwildX32
what are the songs being played selaroche37
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