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St. Ives (1976) Poster

(1976)

Trivia

'The Video Vacuum' has said of this film: "In the wake of Chinatown (1974)'s success, Hollywood went detective crazy. When they weren't remaking movies[,] old detective movies like 'Farewell My Lovely' [See: Murder, My Sweet (1944)], they were doing flicks that channeled the detective films of the 30's and 40. St. Ives (1976) is such a film. The main character isn't exactly a detective but he's involved in a case that isn't too far removed from the sort of predicament Phillip Marlowe frequently found himself in."
Jump to: Cameo (4)
The meaning and relevance of this movie's 'St. Ives' title is that it refers to the last name of the movie's central character, Raymond St. Ives, played by Charles Bronson. The main American movie poster boasted that "Charles Bronson is Ray St. Ives" in its tagline. Bronson's earlier movie, Mr. Majestyk (1974), had also featured his character's surname as its movie title, but with the courtesy title of "Mr." included. Interestingly, the French version of this movie is called 'Monsieur St. Ives', which translates into the English language as, 'Mr. St. Ives'.
Included on the DVD release is, Bronson: St. Ives (1976), an 1976 original short documentary about this movie.
'The New York Times' said that this movie had a central character which was ". . .the kind of private-eye role that Humphrey Bogart used to do."
This movie represented the first of nine teamings of director 'J Lee Thompson' with star actor Charles Bronson. After this picture, they made The White Buffalo (1977), Cabo Blanco (1980), 10 to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), Murphy's Law (1986), Death Wish 4: The Crackdown (1987), Messenger of Death (1988) and Kinjite: Forbidden Subjects (1989).
This movie represents the first of ten teamings between producer Pancho Kohner and star actor Charles Bronson. After this picture, they made The White Buffalo (1977), Love and Bullets (1979), 10 to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), Murphy's Law (1986), Assassination (1987), Death Wish 4: The Crackdown (1987), Messenger of Death (1988) and Kinjite: Forbidden Subjects (1989).
Charles Bronson was about fifty-four years of age when he appeared in this movie.
This movie was made and released about five years after the Ross Thomas novel 'The Procane Chronicle' was first published in 1971. Thomas wrote the novel under the pseudonym Oliver Bleeck.
'Wider Screenings' has called this movie a "detective 'film noir' homage" which "features a dense detective plot in the manner of classic 1940s 'film noir' private eye stories."
Of Charles Bronson in this movie, 'The New York Times' remarked that his ". . . sagging eyes and mustache make him look more and more like Fu Manchu." In film history, Bronson never played the Fu Manchu character in motion pictures.
This movie's MacGuffin are some stolen papers, documents, plans and ledgers which are owned by Abner Procane played by John Houseman. Interestingly, a few years before this movie was made, Houseman appeared in the The Paper Chase (1973) in which he won the Best Actor in a Supporting Role Academy Award Oscar. Charles Bronson's mission in this picture is to recover these papers, his charge being a kind of "paper chase" in a sense.
This Charles Bronson movie was theatrically released between his pictures From Noon Till Three (1976) and The White Buffalo (1977).

Cameo 

Jeff Goldblum:  As Hood #3. Goldblum also appeared in a bit cameo as a thug in Charles Bronson's earlier movie Death Wish (1974).
Robert Englund:  The future Freddy Kruger as Hood #1.
Harris Yulin:  As Detective Oller.
Michael Lerner:  As Myron Green.

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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