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Shout at the Devil (1976) Poster

Trivia

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Stars Roger Moore and Lee Marvin got into a fight during filming, which Moore won. Marvin recalled, "The guy is built like granite. Nobody will ever underestimate him again".
Roger Moore played the young love interest although he was actually 47 in real life.
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In his 2008 autobiography "My Word Is My Bond", Roger Moore recalled that Lee Marvin got into a fight with Japanese journalists at an airport while making this film. He said Marvin still hated the Japanese because of his war experiences.
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The story of the film was inspired by one of the most spectacular and adventurous event that took place during WWI, in German East Africa, later Tanganyika, later Tanzania, in late 1914 - early 1915, known as Battle of Rufiji Delta, in which the German light cruiser SMS Königsberg was blockaded and finally sunk by various British units.
This was the second of two filmed adaptations of novels by Wilbur Smith that starred actor Roger Moore. The first had been Gold (1974) made and released around a couple of years earlier. Both pictures were directed by Peter R. Hunt.
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The picture was first announced in 1969, six years before it was eventually filmed. At that time, publicity stated that the film would be made by Cinerama Inc, but in the end, the movie took a number of years to get financed, and was not shot in Cinerama.
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The time and place the movie is set is Zanzibar and German East Africa in 1913.
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The names of German boats featured in the movie were the river boat "Wilheim" and the WWI-era battle cruiser "Blücher".
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Both star Roger Moore and director Peter R. Hunt had long associations with the James Bond movie franchise, the former starring as the character, and the latter as an editor and director of one of the movies, On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), but Hunt never directed Moore when he was playing Bond.
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There was enormous controversy about the film being made in South Africa under the apartheid regime. Roger Moore was also heavily criticized for making Gold (1974) and The Wild Geese (1978) in South Africa during the apartheid era.
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Scenes that featured the German language in one version of the movie are not subtitled into English yet another version exists where the Germans speak in English.
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This motion picture's opening title card read: "Zanzibar Africa, 1913".
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The film was made and released about eight years after its source novel of the same name by Wilbur Smith had been first published in 1968.
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Publicity for this picture declared that the film was "the greatest African adventure ever filmed" and "an epic so vast it took two years to create and a whole continent to contain".
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The date and place where the marriage ceremony took place was the Delgado Church on 18th February 1914.
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Second and final of two cinema movie collaborations of actor Roger Moore and director Peter R. Hunt. The first had been the feature film Gold (1974). Both pictures were adaptations of novels by Wilbur Smith. Hunt also had previously directed Moore in an episode of The Persuaders! (1971) [See: The Persuaders!: Chain of Events (1971)].
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One of four Africa set and shot movies that actor Roger Moore starred in during the 1970s. The films are Gold (1974), The Wild Geese (1978), Shout at the Devil (1976) and The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).
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The picture included such story elements as "exotic tropical settings, man-eating crocodiles, air and sea combat, shipwreck, big game hunting, natives on a rampage, ticking time bombs, rape and fire, malaria" according to show-business trade paper 'Variety'.
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Several of the creative team on the picture had worked on the earlier Wilbur Smith adaptation of "Gold Mine" (1970) filmed as Gold (1974) which had been made and released about a couple of years earlier.
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The movie's trailer declared the following written statement: "This story is based on a remarkable but true incident that took place in Africa in 1913, before the Great War when the world was very different".
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Lee Marvin was just four years older than Roger Moore.
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Some movie posters for the film featured a long text preamble that read: "Filmed with all the spectacle of 'King Solomon's Mines', the drama of 'African Queen', the passion of 'Snows of Kilimanjaro' and the majesty of 'Lawrence of Arabia'. It is a spectacular adventure you will always remember and a beautiful love story you will never forget".
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Roger Moore says in his biography that Lee Marvin once took a baby in his arms while he was drunk and then the child collapsed because of the alcohol smell.
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The film rights to Wilbur Smith's source novel of the same name were acquired by the film's producer Michael Klinger during the late 1960s.
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Stephen Patrick Azzopardi's first feature film
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The time that the bomb was set to go off on the German battle-cruiser SMS "Blücher" was 6 am in the morning.
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The ending of the movie was changed from Wilbur Smith's source novel where in the book all of the three main characters don't survive.
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