The Omen
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
The Omen (1976) More at IMDbPro »


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003

14 items from 2017


Lord and Miller: 12 other directors who left/got fired from movies during production

21 June 2017 5:52 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Luke Owen looks at directors who left/got fired from movies during production…

With the shocking news that Phil Lord and Chris Miller have vacated the director’s chairs for the yet-to-be-titled Han Solo movie over “creative differences” (some sources say they were forced out), I thought it was time to look at some other directors who faced similar issues.

It’s no secret that making a tentpole movie for a studio is tricky. Duncan Jones has been very vocal as of late about the issues he had with last year’s Warcraft, and it was rumoured a few years ago that Gareth Edwards faced an uphill battle with Warner Bros. and Legendary on 2014’s Godzilla reboot. The 1993 Super Mario Bros. movie had its script re-written the weekend before production started with no input from the directors, who were then locked out of the editing room during post-production (they were eventually let back in).

Most of the time directors leave before production actually starts, and someone new is brought in. Edgar Wright left Ant-Man, Patty Jenkins left Thor: The Dark World, Rick Famuyiwa and Seth Grahame-Smith both left The Flash, Ben Affleck stepped down from The Batman, Stephen Herrick left Lara Croft: Tomb Raider; the list goes on. But very rarely does a director leave (or get fired) while the movie is in production. Usually if a studio loses faith in the director at that point, they would bring in someone else to “oversee” the movie and get it over the finish line. The aforementioned Godzilla saw this very occurrence, as did Mission: Impossible II when the legendary Stuart Baird was brought in to “fix” the movie Jon Woo originally helmed. Baird in fact has a long history with this, being a fixer on titles such as Superman: The Motion Picture, The Omen and Lethal Weapon.

There are still four or so weeks left on the Han Solo movie (plus the already planned reshoots), so let’s look back at a few other directors who left/got fired from their films.

The Wizard of Oz, 1939

It seems crazy to think that one of the most beloved movies of all-time had such a tumultuous production, but The Wizard of Oz in fact saw six different directors helm the movie. Norman Taurog originally shot test footage, but was quickly replaced with Richard Thorpe who shot for around two weeks when Taurog was moved to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Producer Mervyn LeRoy felt that Thorpe was rushing the production, and his short time on the film was probably not helped when original Tin Man Buddy Epsen was hospitalised after the metal make-up coated his lungs and left him on an Iron Lung.

None of Thorpe’s footage made it into the final cut (although he did shoot Dorothy’s first meeting Scarecrow and several scenes at The Wicked Witch’s castle), and George Cucker came in after Thorpe was fired. However, Cucker didn’t actually shoot any footage, and was there to simply oversee the plans to re-shoot all of Thorpe’s work until Victor Fleming came in. Although he was eventually the only credited director, Fleming left before production ended to film Gone with the Wind, and the shooting was finished by King Vidor and LeRoy.

Gone with the Wind, 1939

Speaking of Gone with the Wind, George Cucker had been developing the movie with producer David O. Selznick for around two years, but was removed from the project three weeks into production. According to reports, the decision to remove Cucker was Clark Gable’s and it angered fellow co-stars Vivien Leigh and Olivia de Havilland who went to Selznick’s office to demand he be re-hired. In Cucker’s place was Victor Fleming, who shot the majority of the movie over ninety-three days (although Cucker was secretly coaching Leigh and Havilland behind the scenes). Fleming wasn’t the final name on the movie however, as he had to take a short break due to exhaustion and Sam Wood shot for around twenty-three days.

Spartacus, 1960

Although considered a Stanley Kubrick movie, he wasn’t the first name attached to Spartacus. After David Lean turned down the movie, it was offered to Anthony Mann who was then fired by star Kirk Douglas after just one week of production. According to Douglas in his autobiography, Mann was “scared” of the size and scope of Spartacus and wasn’t capable of finishing the film.

Superman II, 1980

Shooting for Superman II was done alongside Superman: The Motion Picture in 1977 with Richard Donner doing both films. However the film was under a lot of pressure, with overrunning schedules and budget, which producers Alexander and Ilya Salkind and Pierre Spengler attributed to Donner. After everything was shot for Superman: The Motion Picture, Superman II was placed on hiatus. Once Superman: The Motion Picture was an instant hit, the producers brought in Richard Lester to replace Donner on Superman II and shoot around the footage already filmed. Why Lester replaced Donner is still up for debate. Spengler has claimed that Donner was asked to come back but refused, while Donner claims he only found out Superman II was getting underway when he received a fax from the Salkinds telling him his services weren’t required.

The cast and crew did not take the replacement lightly, with creative consultants Tom Mankiewicz and editor Stuart Baird refusing to return for the sequel, along with Gene Hackman who was replaced with a body double. Although Marlon Brando had already shot everything for both movies, he successfully sued the Salkinds who then cut him out of the sequel. Years later, Warner Bros. released the Richard Donner cut of Superman II on home video as Superman II: The Donner Cut.

Piranha II: The Spawning, 1981

Piranha II was originally set to be directed by Roger Corman graduate Miller Drake, who envisioned a version of the movie which saw the return of Kevin McCarthy (who died in the original film). Drake was then replaced with James Cameron who was working on the film’s special effects department, and he then re-wrote the script under the pseudonym H.A. Milton. However around two weeks into production, Cameron was fired by producer Ovidio G. Assonitis who felt he wasn’t doing a good enough job. Assonitis wouldn’t let Cameron review any of the footage he’d shot during his time on the movie, and was even making all of the day-to-day decisions.

A regularly reported story was that Cameron broke into the editing room while the producers were in Cannes to cut his version of the movie, which was then re-cut by Assonitis. “Then the producer wouldn’t take my name off the picture because [contractually] they couldn’t deliver it with an Italian name,” Cameron said in a 1991 La Times interview. “So they left me on, no matter what I did. I had no legal power to influence him from Pomona, California, where I was sleeping on a friend’s couch. I didn’t even know an attorney. In actual fact, I did some directing on the film, but I don’t feel it was my first movie.”

WarGames, 1983

WarGames began life as a very different movie titled The Genius in 1979 about a much older gentlemen, but this changed when writers Walter F. Parkes and Lawrence Lasker discovered a large youth-movement in the computer world, who would later be known as hackers. The character of David Lightman (played by Matthew Broderick) was even modeled after hacking enthusiast David Scott Lewis.

When the film went into production it was being helmed by Martin Brest who was then removed from the movie 12-days into shooting after a disagreement with the producers. In his place was John Badham, whose first act was to lighten the tone of the movie. “[Brest had] taken a somewhat dark approach to the story, and saw Matthew’s character as someone who was rebelling against his parents, and who was just kind of stewing inside,” he told The Hollywood Interview in 2009. “There was that tone to it. I said ‘If I was 16 and could get on a computer and change my grades or my girlfriend’s grades, I would be peeing in my pants with excitement!’ And the way it was shot, it was like they were doing some Nazi undercover thing. So it was my job to make it seem like they were having fun, and that it was exciting, but it wasn’t this dark rebellion.” »

- Luke Owen

Permalink | Report a problem


Marvel and DC Call a Truce to Honor Richard Donner's Superman

8 June 2017 2:33 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

DC Films president Geoff Johns and Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige shared the stage for the Tribute to Richard Donner event in Los Angeles. The Academy of Motion Picture Art and Sciences held the special ceremony for Donner for his lifetime of work in Hollywood. The event saw Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, and Rene Russo form a Lethal Weapon reunion to pay tribute and stars from The Goonies were also in attendance, taking credit for adding a few grey hairs to Donner's head. Feige and Johns paid tribute to Donner and in particular, the first Superman movie, which both men base all of their work after.

Both Feige and Johns got their start in Hollywood through interning for Richard Donner and shared stories about what it was like to work for the director. Johns in particular recounted a story about taking Donner's car off of the Warner Bros. lot that »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Film Academy Pay Tribute to Richard Donner: ‘He’s a F—ing Genius’

8 June 2017 8:54 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Richard Donner‘s big heart — and bigger voice — commanded attention at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ tribute to the director-producer on Wednesday night in Beverly Hills.

“He has a voice that gets the attention of people getting on the bus two blocks away,” said John Savage, who appeared in Donner’s “Inside Moves.”

“You have brought us such joy and we love you for it,” said AMPAS President Cheryl Boone Isaacs at the opening of the tribute.

The two-hour program at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater mixed anecdotes with heartfelt tributes and clips from 1978’s “Superman: The Movie,” along with “The Omen,” the “Lethal Weapon” films, ” “Radio Flyer,” “The Goonies,” “Scrooged,” “Ladyhawke,” “Inside Moves,” and “Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut.”

Related

Jackie Chan Oscar Climaxes Warm Evening at the Governors Awards

DC Entertainment president Geoff Johns and Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige — who both once interned for »

- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


In Space You Can Hear a Symphony: The Story Behind the Theme for "Alien"

6 June 2017 6:29 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Jerry Goldsmith was already a veteran film composer with numerous iconic scores under his belt by the time he was enlisted to work on Ridley Scott’s Alien (1979). He’d worked in radio and television through the 1950s, contributing music to classic shows such as The Twilight Zone (1959) and Perry Mason (1959) before making the move to film, writing scores for films as diverse in subject matter (and sound) as Stagecoach (1966) and Planet of the Apes (1968) in the 1960s and Chinatown (1974) and The Omen (1976) in the 1970s. Goldsmith’s rich orchestral scores for such films, which were informed and influenced by early 20th century modernist composers, are both experimental and economical in their use and development of thematic material. He explained, “What I really try to do is to take one simple motif of the material for the picture, and a broad theme, and construct it so they always can work »

Permalink | Report a problem


The Goonies, Superman, Lethal Weapon Filmmaker Richard Donner Gets Tribute By The Academy June 7

2 June 2017 1:24 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The Academy will pay tribute to director-producer Richard Donner with an evening of personal anecdotes, film clips spanning his prolific career and special appearances by friends and colleagues on Wednesday, June 7, at 7:30 p.m. at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.

Guests to take the stage with Donner include actors Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Rene Russo, Jeff B. Cohen, Carol Kane, Joseph Mazzello, David Morse, Ke Huy Quan and John Savage; producer and president of Marvel Studios Kevin Feige; writer, president and chief creative officer at DC Entertainment Geoff Johns; writer Brian Helgeland; and Lauren Shuler Donner, producer and Donner’s wife for more than 30 years.

Lauren Shuler Donner and Richard Donner 2006 Photo by Steve Granitz/WireImage.com

Donner’s work is wide-ranging, from small independents (“Inside Moves”) to cult classics (“The Goonies”), superhero epics (“Superman”) to medieval love stories (“Ladyhawke”), and mystery-suspense thrillers (“The Omen”) to blockbuster »

- Melissa Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


The Best Of The Best – The Greatest Composers And The Scores That Made Them Great

10 May 2017 4:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Dave Roper

With Actors, Directors, Actresses and Screenwriters under our collective belt and Cinematographers still to come, we presently turn our eye towards Composers, whose music lends so much to the films they work on.

As with the other lists, credit is given for not merely one or two sterling scores, but rather a consistently excellent body of work with specific stand-out films. To be blunt, this is a trickier prospect than it at first appears. Just because a film is terrific or well-loved doesn’t necessarily mean that the score is itself a standout. We begin with perhaps the most obvious and celebrated film composer of them all…..

John WilliamsStar Wars

Goodness me. The Poseidon Adventure, The Towering Inferno, Earthquake, Jaws, Raiders of the Lost Ark, The Long Goodbye, Catch Me If You Can, Star Wars, Close Encounters, Star Wars, Superman, Et, Born on the Fourth of July, »

- Dave Roper

Permalink | Report a problem


Jerry Goldsmith’s 10 Most Indelible Scores

9 May 2017 11:04 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In honor of Jerry Goldsmith’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Jon Burlingame offers ten scores that best capture the late composer’s genius.

1. A Patch of Blue (1965) For the tender relationship between a blind white girl (Elizabeth Hartman) and the kindly black man (Sidney Poitier) she befriends, Goldsmith wrote a haunting, delicate score featuring piano and harmonica.

2. The Sand Pebbles (1966) Goldsmith’s first epic score, for director Robert Wise’s film about a U.S. gunboat in Chinese waters in the 1920s starring Steve McQueen. He evoked an Asian atmosphere with exotic instruments, and his love theme (“And We Were Lovers”) was recorded by artists from Andy Williams to Shirley Bassey.

3. Planet of the Apes (1968) A landmark in film-music history, this unearthly, Bartok- and Stravinsky-influenced soundscape strongly implied that Charlton Heston and his fellow astronauts were marooned on a far-off planet… when, in fact, they were on Earth all along. »

- Jon Burlingame

Permalink | Report a problem


Jerry Goldsmith Receives a Star on the Walk of Fame

9 May 2017 10:59 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

When Joe Dante was asked about supporting the effort to secure a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for Jerry Goldsmith, the director – who had worked with the respected composer on nine films over 20 years – said he was “flabbergasted” to realize Goldsmith didn’t already have one.

On May 9, the Oscar- and Emmy-winning composer of such classics as “Chinatown,” “Planet of the Apes,” “Patton” and dozens more will receive his star, posthumously, on Hollywood Boulevard just east of Highland Avenue. Goldsmith died in 2004.

Dante, for whom Goldsmith scored “Gremlins,” “Explorers,” “Innerspace” and other films, cited “his brilliance and versatility. Any film he scored was automatically improved tenfold.”

Few filmmakers would disagree. Paul Verhoeven, who did “Total Recall,” “Basic Instinct” and “Hollow Man” with Goldsmith, recalls: “Every film was a new adventure, as Jerry was able to adapt to the most diverse narratives and styles. He never repeated himself, always looking for new, »

- Jon Burlingame

Permalink | Report a problem


Otd: Annie, John Cameron Mitchell, and Field of Dreams

21 April 2017 4:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

On this day (April 21st) in history as it relates to showbiz...

Anthony Quinn

1904 Oscar winning cinematographer Daniel L Fapp (West Side Story and Desire Under the Elms, among many films) born in Kansas City

1914 Cinematographer Gilbert Taylor born in England. Though he was BAFTA nominated Oscar never bit despite high profile films and collaborations with famous directors. Credits include: RepulsionThe Omen, Dr Strangelove, Star Wars, Frenzy, Dracula (1979) and MacBeth 

1915 Oscar's all time favorite Mexican actor Anthony Quinn born (Lust for Life, Viva Zapata, Wild is the Wind, Zorba the Greek, La Strada, etcetera)

1918 "The Red Baron," the famous German fighter pilot, shot down in World War I. Snoopy in Peanuts fantasizes about him repeatedly and he's also been a character in many films including Wings, Hell's Angels, and Darling Lili  »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


Happy Holidays from Pt Anderson: The Director’s New Film Drops Christmas Day

30 March 2017 9:04 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Anytime Paul Thomas Anderson releases a new movie is cause for celebration, but this year doubly so.

Via Jeff Sneider, Eic of The Tracking Board, it was announced yesterday at the Focus Features presentation during Cinema Con that the writer-director’s next film, the yet-to-be-officially-titled collaboration with Daniel Day Lewis about a royal dressmaker in the 1950s, will be released here in the Us on Christmas Day 2017.

No footage was shown and that pesky working title — Phantom Thread­ — was neither confirmed nor denied, but by all accounts production is going swimmingly and an end-date is in sight. As I mentioned above, the film deals with a dressmaker, played by Day Lewis, but specifically the film “illuminates the life behind the curtain of an uncompromising dressmaker commissioned by royalty and high society.” Other members of the cast include Lesley Manville (Secrets & Lies), Richard Graham (Titanic), and Vicky Krieps (Hanna). It wasn’t revealed whether the December 25th release »

- H. Perry Horton

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Angel Heart’: Hell Hath No Fury Like the Devil Scorned

6 March 2017 9:16 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Today, March 6th, Sir Alan Parker‘s Angel Heart turns thirty, thus creating a golden opportunity for yet another appreciation of what was considered by many an over-stylized satanic shock-fest back in the 80s but has since revealed itself to be, in this writer’s humble opinion, one of the best psychological horrors in the history of American cinema. Read our take on it, though a disclaimer should be made for those who have yet to watch Parker’s mercilessly dark and sinister masterpiece: as the film depends to some extent on the gradual reveal of the mystery central to its narrative – the many elements of which shall be discussed in the following piece – the best way to experience it is with as little insight as possible, and only then compare your view with ours. This is due to the fact that Angel Heart boasts one of the great twists of 1980s, »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


13 Cursed Movies for Friday the 13th (Photos)

12 January 2017 8:30 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Happy Friday the 13th. Making movies is a business that proves that Murphy’s Law is a real and horrifying thing. For these 13 movies, chaos, misfortune, and sometimes an unnerving amount of death hovered over like a black raincloud that won’t go away. Over the course of the making of the Poltergeist trilogy, four cast members died. The most shocking was 12-year-old Heather O’Rourke, who died of septic shock at age 12. No one was seriously hurt during filming of The Omen. but chaos seemed to surround everyone involved. Star Gregory Peck and screenwriter David Seltzer had their flights struck by. »

- Wrap Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Photographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki dies aged 91

6 January 2017 1:41 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Bielecki worked on Star Wars, Superman and Alien.

Photographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki has died aged 91.

Born in Lviv, Poland in 1925, Bielecki came to London after WWII to work as a photojournalist before establishing his lab Sb international in the 1960’s in order to focus on film still photography.

Working with renowned stillsmen such as Bob Penn, Johnny Jay and Tony Snowdon, Bielecki commissioned, developed and distributed photographic material for the marketing for major films of the 1970’s and 1980’s, among them The Omen, The French Connection, Monty Python’s Meaning of Life and the Rocky Horror Picture Show. 

He also worked on the first Star Wars, Superman and Alien movies as an advertising and publicity consultant. Across his career he was commissioned as a consultant by 20th Century Fox, MGM, Columbia, The Ladd Company, Universal, Walt Disney Studios and many independents.

Directors he worked with include Mel Brooks, Peter Bogdanovich, [link »

Permalink | Report a problem


Potographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki dies aged 91

6 January 2017 1:41 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Bielecki worked on Star Wars, Superman and Alien.

Photographer and publicity consultant Stanley Bielecki has died aged 91.

Born in Lviv, Poland in 1925, Bielecki came to London after WWII to work as a photojournalist before establishing his lab Sb international in the 1960’s in order to focus on film still photography.

Working with renowned stillsmen such as Bob Penn, Johnny Jay and Tony Snowdon, Bielecki commissioned, developed and distributed photographic material for the marketing for major films of the 1970’s and 1980’s, among them The Omen, The French Connection, Monty Python’s Meaning of Life and the Rocky Horror Picture Show. 

He also worked on the first Star Wars, Superman and Alien movies as an advertising and publicity consultant. Across his career he was commissioned as a consultant by 20th Century Fox, MGM, Columbia, The Ladd Company, Universal, Walt Disney Studios and many independents.

Directors he worked with include Mel Brooks, Peter Bogdanovich, [link »

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003

14 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners