6.9/10
1,566
24 user 11 critic

Next Stop, Greenwich Village (1976)

The portrayal of pretentiously bohemian youth.

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Nominated for 2 Golden Globes. Another 4 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Adventure | Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

When his apartment building is torn down, a retired lifelong New Yorker goes on a cross country odyssey with his beloved cat Tonto.

Director: Paul Mazursky
Stars: Art Carney, Ellen Burstyn, René Enríquez
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A wealthy woman from Manhattan's Upper East Side struggles to deal with her new identity and her sexuality after her husband of 16 years leaves her for a younger woman.

Director: Paul Mazursky
Stars: Jill Clayburgh, Alan Bates, Michael Murphy
Blume in Love (1973)
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

Lawyer Stephen Blume, specialized in divorces, lives a paradoxical situation when, having his own marriage break up, is still in love with his ex-wife.

Director: Paul Mazursky
Stars: George Segal, Susan Anspach, Kris Kristofferson
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

Documentary film-maker Bob Sanders and his wife Carol attend a group therapy session that serves as the backdrop for the opening scenes of the film. Returning to their Los Angeles home, the... See full summary »

Director: Paul Mazursky
Stars: Natalie Wood, Robert Culp, Elliott Gould
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.9/10 X  

Broad satire and buffoonery presented as a series of movie trailers. Among the titles and subjects are: "The Howard Huge Story", "Skate-boarders from Hell", "The Invasion of the Penis ... See full summary »

Director: Ira Miller
Stars: Royce D. Applegate, Lewis Arquette, Tom Baker
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.2/10 X  

Bohemian Alex Morrison has just finished directing his first feature length movie. In its previews, the movie is considered a critical, artistic and surefire commercial success. As such, ... See full summary »

Director: Paul Mazursky
Stars: Donald Sutherland, Ellen Burstyn, Meg Mazursky
Biography | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

Based on the true story of Valerie Solanas who was a 60s radical preaching hatred toward men in her "Scum" manifesto. She wrote a screenplay for a film that she wanted Andy Warhol to ... See full summary »

Director: Mary Harron
Stars: Lili Taylor, Jared Harris, Martha Plimpton
Certificate: M/PG Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

The lives of a disparate group of contestants intertwine in an inhumanely grueling dance marathon.

Director: Sydney Pollack
Stars: Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, Susannah York
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Ken Harrison is an artist who makes sculptures. One day he is involved in a car accident, and is paralyzed from his neck down. All he can do is talk, and he wants to die. In hospital he ... See full summary »

Director: John Badham
Stars: Richard Dreyfuss, John Cassavetes, Christine Lahti
B.C. Rock (1980)
Animation | Adventure | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

Adult animated comedy with rock music soundtrack portraying a far-fetched explanation of the Dawn of Man.

Director: Picha
Stars: Richard Darbois, Georges Aminel, Roger Carel
Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.8/10 X  

Couple of strangers arrive in a small town, each one after a different thing.

Director: David Leeds
Stars: Margot Kidder, Geoffrey Lewis, Christopher Walken
Coming Home (1978)
Drama | Romance | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A woman whose husband is fighting in Vietnam falls in love with another man who suffered a paralyzing combat injury there.

Director: Hal Ashby
Stars: Jane Fonda, Jon Voight, Bruce Dern
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
Anita Cunningham
...
Robert Fulmer (as Chris Walken)
Dori Brenner ...
...
...
Herb
...
Michael Egan ...
Rashel Novikoff ...
Mrs. Tupperman (as Rachel Novikoff)
John C. Becher ...
Sid Weinberg - Casting Director
...
Clyde Baxter
...
Cop at El Station (as Joe Spinnell)
...
Edit

Storyline

An aspiring Jewish actor moves out of his parents' Brooklyn apartment to seek his fortune in the bohemian life of Greenwich Village in 1953. He struggles to come to terms with his feelings about his mother's overbearing nature, while also trying to maintain his relationship with his girlfriend. Written by scgary66

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

1953 Was a Good Year for Leaving Home

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

4 February 1976 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ein Haar in der Suppe  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The bar where Larry goes to talk to Robert, is a real bar, in Greenwhich Village. Julius's a gay hustler bar, and has been at the same location for decades. See more »

Goofs

Set in 1953, but the unmistakable twin towers of the World Trade Center (completed in 1973) are visible in an exterior scene. See more »

Quotes

Ellen: Was everything a joke to you?
Larry Lapinsky: Not everything.
Herbert Berghof - Acting Coach: See, you're joking right now, right?
Larry Lapinsky: What do you want me to say?
Herbert Berghof - Acting Coach: Joking is what's doing you in. Joking is the American actor's disease. It's the American person's disease. Because what you're doing is you're keeping reality out so that it won't touch you. The worst kind of joking you can do is keep life out. Commenting, editorializing, joking - terrible! Don't do it. It's fatal.
See more »

Connections

References A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) See more »

Soundtracks

Yesterdays
Written by Jerome Kern (uncredited) and Otto A. Harbach (uncredited)
Performed by J.J. Johnson
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A FILM TRIBUTE TO A VERY SPECIAL PLACE AND TIME

During June of 1954 in New York City, I graduated junior high school and, to celebrate the event, joined three of my classmates on a forbidden sojourn to the city's famous Greenwich Village. Exiting the subway station at Christopher street, we were amazed at the apparent ordinariness of this place we'd heard so much about from older adolescents and adults.

In fact, at first glance, nothing extraordinary seemed to be happening there, with the sole exception of more White people being present than four Black teenagers from Harlem were were accustomed to seeing.

For you see, this was the mid 1950's, Dr. Martin Luthor King Jr. had as yet to lead any freedom marches, Southern schools were as yet to be integrated, and in many Southern states Black people were lynched on Saturday nights as town entertainment. But three hours later, we knew that everything we'd heard about Greenwich Village was true and more. For this was a place far ahead of it's time.

In the Greenwich Village of the 1950's, racial integration had been in place for well over two decades. But far more important, forbidden talk of sexual liberation, interracial sex, homosexuality, along with political, artistic and literary freedom at all levels were openly discussed, flouted and displayed for all to see; performed to a background mixture of new age Jazz, early Rock and Roll and Folk Music. Virtually nothing was excluded from the social or musical menu this incredible place had to offer.

I can't speak for the rest of my friends on that day, but I immediately fell in love with the place and remained so, until it's untimely demise at the hands of the high rise-high priced real estate industry toward the mid 1970's. By then, the people who had made the place justifiably famous and notorious for what it was, could no longer afford to live there. So the Village remained,in name only, as it is today: a mere shadow of what it used to be.

Joyfully, director Paul Mazursky has managed to capture on film, a moving snapshot of the social life and time of a remarkable neighborhood, in what was probably the last fifteen to twenty years of it's legitimate life. And I do remember it so well. The rent parties for starving (sometimes talented) artists, the ubiquitous book shops, the coffee houses featuring impromptu poetry readings, the fashion statements (or blatant lack thereof), the mixing and making of all sorts of colorful characters who, even in their farcical attempts to parody themselves, were more alive and real then those who would put them down. This was the Greenwich Village of the 1950's and of legend.

This magical place was for me and many others (as was for the director who produced this film as an ode to his time there), our first real awakening and taste of adult life. And far more important, a fortuitous preparation for the new social order that was, in time, to come.

The place, as it was, is truly deserving of this wonderful little gem of a film.


47 of 51 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 24 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page