6.9/10
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23 user 11 critic

Next Stop, Greenwich Village (1976)

The portrayal of pretentiously bohemian youth.

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Nominated for 2 Golden Globes. Another 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Lenny Baker ...
...
...
Sarah Roth
...
Anita Cunningham
...
Robert Fulmer (as Chris Walken)
Dori Brenner ...
Connie
...
Bernstein Chandler
...
Herb
...
Ben Lapinsky
Michael Egan ...
Herbert Berghof - Acting Coach
Rashel Novikoff ...
Mrs. Tupperman (as Rachel Novikoff)
John C. Becher ...
Sid Weinberg - Casting Director
...
...
Cop at El Station (as Joe Spinnell)
Denise Galik ...
Ellen
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Storyline

An aspiring Jewish actor moves out of his parents' Brooklyn apartment to seek his fortune in the bohemian life of Greenwich Village in 1953. He struggles to come to terms with his feelings about his mother's overbearing nature, while also trying to maintain his relationship with his girlfriend. Written by scgary66

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

1953 Was a Good Year for Leaving Home

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

4 February 1976 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ein Haar in der Suppe  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first, and, sadly, final film appearance of Lenny Baker and his only film as a leading actor. See more »

Goofs

In the early scene where Lenny leaves home, he moves his suitcase from the chair to the floor, then tells his mother that she's going to give herself a heart attack, and when the camera cuts back the suitcase is back in the chair. See more »

Quotes

Nick Kessel: Hi. Buenas noches, señor. Senñorita.
Larry Lapinsky: How are you?
Nick Kessel: Good.
Sarah Roth: Who is that?
Larry Lapinsky: It's Nick Kessler. He's a crazy guy. He saved up all his money to go to Mexico. Wanted to see the ruins. You know, get into the primitive thing. So, he quit his job and everything, and he took off for Mexico City on Monday. Two beers, Ray.
Sarah Roth: Yesterday Monday?
Larry Lapinsky: Right. So he got off the plane, and he ate a taco... and he got a terrible case of the shits... so he took the next plane back. He spent two and a half hours in Mexico. He ...
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Connections

References Little Caesar (1931) See more »

Soundtracks

For All We Know
Written by Sam Lewis (uncredited) and J. Fred Coots (uncredited)
Performed by the Dave Brubeck Quartet
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User Reviews

 
A FILM TRIBUTE TO A VERY SPECIAL PLACE AND TIME
3 March 2002 | by (USA) – See all my reviews

During June of 1954 in New York City, I graduated junior high school and, to celebrate the event, joined three of my classmates on a forbidden sojourn to the city's famous Greenwich Village. Exiting the subway station at Christopher street, we were amazed at the apparent ordinariness of this place we'd heard so much about from older adolescents and adults.

In fact, at first glance, nothing extraordinary seemed to be happening there, with the sole exception of more White people being present than four Black teenagers from Harlem were were accustomed to seeing.

For you see, this was the mid 1950's, Dr. Martin Luthor King Jr. had as yet to lead any freedom marches, Southern schools were as yet to be integrated, and in many Southern states Black people were lynched on Saturday nights as town entertainment. But three hours later, we knew that everything we'd heard about Greenwich Village was true and more. For this was a place far ahead of it's time.

In the Greenwich Village of the 1950's, racial integration had been in place for well over two decades. But far more important, forbidden talk of sexual liberation, interracial sex, homosexuality, along with political, artistic and literary freedom at all levels were openly discussed, flouted and displayed for all to see; performed to a background mixture of new age Jazz, early Rock and Roll and Folk Music. Virtually nothing was excluded from the social or musical menu this incredible place had to offer.

I can't speak for the rest of my friends on that day, but I immediately fell in love with the place and remained so, until it's untimely demise at the hands of the high rise-high priced real estate industry toward the mid 1970's. By then, the people who had made the place justifiably famous and notorious for what it was, could no longer afford to live there. So the Village remained,in name only, as it is today: a mere shadow of what it used to be.

Joyfully, director Paul Mazursky has managed to capture on film, a moving snapshot of the social life and time of a remarkable neighborhood, in what was probably the last fifteen to twenty years of it's legitimate life. And I do remember it so well. The rent parties for starving (sometimes talented) artists, the ubiquitous book shops, the coffee houses featuring impromptu poetry readings, the fashion statements (or blatant lack thereof), the mixing and making of all sorts of colorful characters who, even in their farcical attempts to parody themselves, were more alive and real then those who would put them down. This was the Greenwich Village of the 1950's and of legend.

This magical place was for me and many others (as was for the director who produced this film as an ode to his time there), our first real awakening and taste of adult life. And far more important, a fortuitous preparation for the new social order that was, in time, to come.

The place, as it was, is truly deserving of this wonderful little gem of a film.


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