Mikey and Nicky (1976) - News Poster

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New to Streaming: ‘Sense8,’ ‘Anomalisa,’ ‘The Autopsy of Jane Doe,’ ‘Deepwater Horizon,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Anomalisa (Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson)

Charlie Kaufman, the writer behind Being John Malkovich and Adaptation, teams up with animator Duke Johnson to create a complex emotional drama starring lifelike puppets. The premise is riddled with existential dread of modern-day life, presented uniquely through Kaufman’s idiosyncratic point-of-view. For protagonist and self-help author Michael Stone (voiced soulfully by David Thewlis), everyone around him has the same voice (thanks to
See full article at The Film Stage »

Oscar-Winning Production Designer Paul Sylbert Dies at 88

Paul Sylbert, who shared an Oscar for production design for Warren Beatty’s “Heaven Can Wait” and worked on notable films including “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” died Nov. 19. He was 88.

Producer Hawk Koch, who worked with him on five films, said “Paul was one of a kind. He was as smart and well-read as anyone I have ever come in contact with, and he was respected by all that knew him. Aside from the work, he loved music, literature, opera, and friends.”

Sylbert shared shared a second nomination for the 1991 Barbra Streisand film “The Prince of Tides.”

He was the identical twin brother of fellow production designer Richard Sylbert, who died in 2002.

Paul Sylbert’s career began with a production designer credit on an early TV show, CBS’ “Premiere,” in 1951 and work as a set decorator on the CBS series “Suspense” the following year and stretched through
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jesse Klein’s ‘We’re Still Together’ Explores, Anger, Rebellion, Family at Karlovy Vary

Jesse Klein’s ‘We’re Still Together’ Explores, Anger, Rebellion, Family at Karlovy Vary
Karlovy Vary Canadian director Jesse Klein sophomore feature, “We're Still Together,” world premieres Thursday in competition at Karlovy Vary. The film, about a bullied teen who befriends a tough and rebellious young single father, explores themes of loneliness, relationship, love and male failure.

Klein’s first film was the 2010 family drama “Shadowboxing.” The Montreal native most recently served as an assistant professor of film and new media at Middle Georgia State University. His next projects include “Break the Fall,” a film about a woman who returns to her husband and young daughter after a three-year absence due to postpartum depression, and “Picture Me,” a TV show about a college graduate making a documentary about her little brother, who is exploring his gender identity. “We’re Still Together” is produced by Evren Boisjoli and Marley Sniatowsky. Variety talked to Klein at Karlovy Vary.

How would you describe this particular story
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Elaine May Honored by Writers Guild of America

Elaine May Honored by Writers Guild of America
Elaine May will receive the Writers Guild of America West’s Laurel Award for Screenwriting Achievement to honor her career and body of work.

May will be honored at the Writers Guild Awards Los Angeles ceremony to be held on Feb. 13 at the Century Plaza.

Elaine May defines the phrase ‘smart and funny,’” said WGA West President Howard A. Rodman. “From the Compass Players to Nichols & May to ‘A New Leaf’ and ‘The Heartbreak Kid’ and Mikey and Nicky, she invented a strain of knowing, painful, ironic humor that quickly became central to what we now think of as comedy. She’s received Oscar nominations and WGA nominations and Writers Guild Awards, all well-deserved; but it is time to recognize, plainly and simply, the debt that all of us owe to her brave, groundbreaking, fiercely intelligent, deeply human, relentlessly honest, scorchingly funny work.”

May has been a member of the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Field Guide to Netflix Canada: ‘A New Leaf’

  • SoundOnSight
A New Leaf

Written by Elaine May

Directed by Elaine May

USA, 1971

Fellow Canadian cinephiles know that our local version of Netflix has a terrible wheat-to-chaff ratio. The thin library, coupled with the still-not-great Ui, makes it so that a disproportionately large amount of legwork has to be put into just browsing for movies. Then there’s what available. It’s unlikely that you’ll find a movie olden than you on the front page. This is because the collection sharply skews recent: at time of writing, approximately 0.01% of the films in the library were released before 1960. For comparison, about 58% of the films currently available were released this decade. Despite all this, though, I come here today not to bury Netflix Canada, nor to tear it a new one, but to provide fellow Canucks with a road map to navigating Netflix’s choppy waters. And with that, I welcome you
See full article at SoundOnSight »

'Ishtar': Seven Myths Regarding The Legendary Flop

  • Moviefone
"If all of the people who hate 'Ishtar' had seen it, I would be a rich woman today." So said Elaine May in 2006, two decades after the Warren Beatty-Dustin Hoffman comedy she wrote and directed had become synonymous with "extravagant flop." (The film grossed $14.4 million on a $55 million budget.) Up until May 22, 1987 (the day it opened in theaters, 25 years ago), advance buzz on "Ishtar" was contentious; it was either a brilliant comic masterpiece or a textbook case of overreach on the part of two giant Hollywood egos to whom no one could say, "No." After the film's release... same thing. To this day, the movie is roundly mocked for its alleged awfulness (often by people who've never seen it), while a passionate cult of fans insists it's a lost work of misunderstood genius that never got its proper due from critics or moviegoers. The truth lies somewhere in the middle.
See full article at Moviefone »

Daily Briefing. To Save and Project, Radical Adults and More

  • MUBI
"Although most film festivals are consecrated to glamorous premieres and the newsworthy new, [To Save and Project: The Ninth Moma International Festival of Film Preservation, opening tomorrow and running through November 19,] treasures the rediscovered and dusted-off," writes J Hoberman in the Voice. "Like browsing a used bookstore in an unfamiliar city — another endangered pleasure — parsing Tsap's lineup, you're never sure what will turn up. This year's attractions range from a restored color version of Georges Méliès's A Trip to the Moon (the Star Wars of 1902) and the first Soviet stereo-vision feature, Robinzon Kruso (1947), to new prints of Roger Corman's anti-segregationist screen-scorcher The Intruder (the most alarming B-movie of 1962), Louis Malle's 1969 doc Calcutta (showing with Iranian poet Forough Farrokhzad's lyrical portrait of a leper colony, The House Is Black), Alberto Lattuada's 1952 neorealist adaptation of Gogol's The Overcoat, and Elaine May's 1976 black comedy Mikey and Nicky (the best movie John Cassavetes never made), as well as the preserved work of the late downtown performance artist Stuart Sherman.
See full article at MUBI »

Actors who turn director: what drives on-screen talent behind the camera?

Paddy Considine is the latest actor to turn film-maker, with his highly acclaimed Tyrannosaur. Who else has made the switch?

Best known for his performances in Shane Meadows-helmed films such as A Room for Romeo Brass and Dead Man's Shoes, Paddy Considine is swapping his acting career – which includes stints in Hollywood in The Bourne Ultimatum and Cinderella Man – for the director's chair. His film Tyrannosaur, which he wrote and directed, was released on 7 October. But Considine isn't the first actor to sign up for a spell behind the camera. What drives other performers to make the switch?

The egoists

The need to take absolute control can be a powerful motivator. Charlie Chaplin began his film career working under the tutelage of Mack Sennett, who laid down the essentials of slapstick comedy, and directors such as Mabel Normand and Henry Lehrman. But pretty soon he was writing scripts, directing
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

What’s All The Hulu-baloo About? This Week In Criterion’s Hulu Channel

This one is coming up late, due to Criterion jam packing a ton of releases on Friday, right while I was finishing up the original post. I think they wanted to mess with me, which is very funny. But being the premier (and only) site that gives you the best coverage of Hulu Plus movies, I don’t mind taking the time at all. I’m hoping it has nothing to do with the recent shake-up going on that Josh just reported on the other day (here), and with Hulu wanting to be bought because of financial problems stemming from multiple sources, this makes one wonder what’s going to happen to the Criterion Collection and their deal with Hulu. I’m crossing my fingers that whoever buys the service, be it Amazon, Google or Yahoo (who is the frontrunner), it doesn’t ruin the deal in place for Criterion and its films.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Peter Falk obituary

Us actor whose success as the scruffy TV detective Columbo was complemented by a wide range of stage and screen roles

Show-business history records that the American actor Peter Falk, who has died aged 83, made his stage debut the year before he left high school, presciently cast as a detective. Despite the 17-year-old's fleeting success, he had no thoughts of pursuing acting as a career – if only because tough kids from the Bronx considered it an unsuitable job for a man. Just 24 years later, Falk made his first television appearance as the scruffy detective, Columbo, not only becoming the highest paid actor on television – commanding $500,000 an episode during the 1970s – but also the most famous.

Inevitably the lieutenant dedicated to unravelling the villainy of the wealthy and glamorous dominated his career, although – unlike some actors – he escaped the straitjacket, or in his case shabby raincoat, of typecasting. In addition to stage work,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Peter Falk obituary

Us actor whose success as the scruffy TV detective Columbo was complemented by a wide range of stage and screen roles

Show-business history records that the American actor Peter Falk, who has died aged 83, made his stage debut the year before he left high school, presciently cast as a detective. Despite the 17-year-old's fleeting success, he had no thoughts of pursuing acting as a career – if only because tough kids from the Bronx considered it an unsuitable job for a man. Just 24 years later, Falk made his first television appearance as the scruffy detective, Columbo, not only becoming the highest paid actor on television – commanding $500,000 an episode during the 1970s – but also the most famous.

Inevitably the lieutenant dedicated to unravelling the villainy of the wealthy and glamorous dominated his career, although – unlike some actors – he escaped the straitjacket, or in his case shabby raincoat, of typecasting. In addition to stage work,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Peter Falk, 1927 - 2011

  • MUBI
Updated through 6/26.

"Peter Falk, the stage and movie actor who became identified as the squinty, rumpled detective in Columbo, which spanned 30 years in primetime television and established one of the most iconic characters in police work, has died. He was 83." Anthony McCartney for the AP: "Falk made his film debut in 1958 with Wind Across the Everglades and established himself as a talented character actor with his performance as the vicious killer Abe Reles in Murder, Inc. Among his other movies: It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Robin and the Seven Hoods, The Great Race, Luv, Castle Keep, The Cheap Detective, The Brinks Job, The In-Laws, The Princess Bride. Falk also appeared in a number of art house favorites, including the semi-improvisational films Husbands and A Woman Under the Influence, directed by his friend John Cassavetes, and Wim Wenders's Wings of Desire, in which he played himself."

Last November,
See full article at MUBI »

See also

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