IMDb > Logan's Run (1976)
Logan's Run
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Logan's Run (1976) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.8/10   34,400 votes »
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Down 9% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
David Zelag Goodman (screenplay)
William F. Nolan (novel) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Logan's Run on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
23 June 1976 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The only thing you can't have in this perfect world of total pleasure is your 30th birthday . . . Logan is 29. See more »
Plot:
An idyllic sci-fi future has one major drawback: life must end at 30. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 7 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Whether you're Green, Red,or Over 30 This is Great Sci-Fi!!! See more (230 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Michael York ... Logan

Richard Jordan ... Francis

Jenny Agutter ... Jessica

Roscoe Lee Browne ... Box

Farrah Fawcett ... Holly (as Farrah Fawcett-Majors)

Michael Anderson Jr. ... Doc

Peter Ustinov ... Old Man
Randolph Roberts ... 2nd Sanctuary Man
Lara Lindsay ... The Woman Runner

Gary Morgan ... Billy

Michelle Stacy ... Mary 2
Laura Hippe ... Woman Customer

David Westberg ... Sandman
Camilla Carr ... Sanctuary Woman

Greg Lewis ... Cub (as Gregg Lewis)
Ashley Cox ... Timid Girl
Bill Couch ... Sandman
Glenn R. Wilder ... Runner (as Glen Wilder)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Joe L. Blevins ... Last Day Character (uncredited)
Roger Borden ... Sandman Daniel (uncredited)
Paula Crist ... City Dweller (uncredited)

Dick DeCoit ... (uncredited)
Chuck Gaylord ... Cub (uncredited)

Mitchell Gaylord ... Cub (uncredited)
Johnny Haymer ... (uncredited)

William E. Johnson III ... Extra (uncredited)
Richard Kelton ... Sanctuary Man (voice) (uncredited)
Jessie Kirby ... Confused City Dweller (uncredited)
Greg Michaels ... 3rd Sanctuary Man / Ambush Man (uncredited)
Bob Neill ... 1st Sanctuary Man (uncredited)
Candice Rialson ... 1st Screamer in Logan's Apartment (uncredited)
Johnny Timko ... (uncredited)

Directed by
Michael Anderson 
 
Writing credits
David Zelag Goodman (screenplay)

William F. Nolan (novel "Logan's Run") and
George Clayton Johnson (novel "Logan's Run")

Produced by
Hugh Benson .... associate producer
Saul David .... producer
 
Original Music by
Jerry Goldsmith 
 
Cinematography by
Ernest Laszlo (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Bob Wyman 
 
Casting by
Jack Baur 
 
Production Design by
Dale Hennesy (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Dale Hennesy 
 
Set Decoration by
Robert De Vestel 
 
Costume Design by
Bill Thomas 
 
Makeup Department
Judith A. Cory .... hair styles (as Judy Alexander Corey)
William Tuttle .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Byron Roberts .... unit production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Alan Brimfeld .... second assistant director (as Alan H. Brimfield)
Win Phelps .... second assistant director
David Silver .... assistant director
John Slosser .... second second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Jack M. Marino .... property master
Charles Sertin .... property assistant
William Cruse .... set designer (uncredited)
Dave Margolin .... painter (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Jerry Jost .... sound
William L. McCaughey .... sound (as William McCaughey)
John Riordan .... sound editor (as John P. Riordan)
Aaron Rochin .... sound
Harry W. Tetrick .... sound
Ken Dufva .... foley artist (uncredited)
Stephen Katz .... stereo sound consultant: Dolby (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Glen Robinson .... special effects
Wayne Beauchamp .... special effects (uncredited)
Thomas L. Fisher .... special effects assistant (uncredited)
Gary L. King .... special effects (uncredited)
Jay King .... special effects technician (uncredited)
Terry W. King .... special effects technician (uncredited)
Wayne Rose .... special effects (uncredited)
Jimmy Thomson .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
L.B. Abbott .... special visual effects designer
James F. Liles .... optical supervisor (as Jim Liles)
Larry Robinson .... assistant: L. B. Abbott
Frank Van der Veer .... additional visuals (as Frank Van Der Veer)
Matthew Yuricich .... matte paintings
 
Stunts
Bill Couch .... stunt coordinator
Glenn R. Wilder .... stunt coordinator (as Glen Wilder)
Phil Adams .... stunts (uncredited)
Denny Arnold .... stunts (uncredited)
Gregory J. Barnett .... stunts (uncredited)
Craig R. Baxley .... stunts (uncredited)
May Boss .... stunts (uncredited)
Steven Burnett .... stunts (uncredited)
Dottie Catching .... stunts (uncredited)
Bill Couch Jr. .... stunts (uncredited)
Paula Crist .... stunts (uncredited)
Pepper Curtis .... stunts (uncredited)
Angelo De Meo .... stunts (uncredited)
Paula Dell .... stunts (uncredited)
Wayne Dillard .... stunts (uncredited)
Jeannie Epper .... stunts (uncredited)
Donna Garrett .... stunts (uncredited)
Chuck Gaylord .... stunts (uncredited)
Mitchell Gaylord .... stunts (uncredited)
Barbara Graham .... stunts (uncredited)
Tommy J. Huff .... stunts (uncredited)
Whitey Hughes .... stunts (uncredited)
Loren Janes .... stunts (uncredited)
Rosemary Johnston .... stunts (uncredited)
Dawn Landing .... stunts (uncredited)
Carol Lee .... stunts (uncredited)
'Wild' Bill Mock .... stunts (uncredited)
Gary Morgan .... stunts (uncredited)
Carole Navarro .... stunts (uncredited)
Beth Nufer .... stunts (uncredited)
Regina Parton .... stunts (uncredited)
Alex Plasschaert .... stunts (uncredited)
Fluir Powell .... stunts (uncredited)
Dar Robinson .... stunts (uncredited)
Walter Robles .... stunts (uncredited)
Russell Saunders .... stunts (uncredited)
Lori Thomas .... stunts (uncredited)
Mike Washlake .... stunts (uncredited)
Glenn R. Wilder .... stunts (uncredited)
Sunny Woods .... stunts (uncredited)
Dick Ziker .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Martin Kashuk .... key grip (as Martin G. Kashuk)
Don Stott .... chief set electrician
Ron Anderson .... electrician (uncredited)
Doug Byers .... electrician (uncredited)
Scott Hamilton .... still photographer (uncredited)
Robert Jason .... electrician (uncredited)
Robert C. Jessup .... director of photography: second unit (uncredited)
Mike Redding .... lighting technician (uncredited)
Gary Stark .... electrician (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Richard Butz .... wardrobe (as Dick Butz)
Edna Taylor .... wardrobe
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Freeman A. Davies .... associate film editor (as Freeman A. Davies Jr.)
Chuck Ellison .... assistant film editor (as Charles G. Ellison)
 
Music Department
Harry V. Lojewski .... music supervisor
William Saracino .... music editor
Harry Bluestone .... musician: violin (uncredited)
Larry Bunker .... musician: percussion (uncredited)
Jerry Goldsmith .... conductor (uncredited)
Willard Jones .... music copyist (uncredited)
Artie Kane .... musician: piano and keyboards (uncredited)
Milton Kestenbaum .... musician: bass (uncredited)
Virginia Majewski .... musician: viola (uncredited)
Arthur Morton .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Richard Nash .... musician: trombone (uncredited)
Uan Rasey .... musician: trumpet (uncredited)
Emil Richards .... musician: percussion (uncredited)
Aaron Rochin .... music engineer (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Leon Charles .... dialogue coach
Lara Lindsay .... assistant to producer
Ron Mitchell .... production assistant
Don Morgan .... unit publicist
Christopher Outwater .... laser consultant
Ray Quiroz .... script supervisor
Richard Vetter .... consultant: Todd-AO
Stefan Wenta .... choreography
 
Thanks
Diane Booker .... thanks: executive director, the Texas Film Commission, Dallas, Texas
W.E. Cooper .... thanks: president, Dallas Market Center, Dallas, Texas
T.S. Eliot .... "Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats" is quoted by permission
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
119 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Metrocolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) | Dolby (35 mm prints) (as Dolby System Noise Reduction-High Fidelity) | 4-Track Stereo
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:G (alternate rating) | Australia:PG (original rating) | Canada:PG (Manitoba) | Canada:A (Nova Scotia) | Canada:AA (Ontario) | Canada:G (Quebec) | Canada:PG (TV rating) | Finland:K-16 | Iceland:L | Italy:T | Netherlands:12 | Norway:16 | Singapore:PG | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (tv rating) | UK:12 (video rating: feature and audio commentary: 227 min 31 sec) (2008) | UK:PG (SubTV) (1991) | UK:PG (video rating) (1986) (1995) | USA:PG | West Germany:12
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Roscoe Lee Browne both voiced and performed Box the robot on-set. The unwieldy costume made it impossible for Browne to right himself if he fell over.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Logan and Jessica first go outside and see the sunrise, the sun is just above the horizon line, then high above it, then back to just above it again.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Logan:[tapping on a glass window of maternity room] Wake up.
Francis 7:Logan, you are here. I couldn't believe it when they told me. What are you doing?
Logan:[indicates baby] Logan 6. Well it's not everyday that they authorize a new sandman. I tell you Francis,
[indicating baby]
Logan:that's him.
Francis 7:Well maybe, maybe not. What does it matter? Anyway, he isn't yours anymore.
Logan:[continues tapping lightly on the glass]
Francis 7:All right, you want me to wake him?
[bangs loudly on the glass with his baton]
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Dangerous Days: Making Blade Runner (2007) (V)See more »

FAQ

Is "Logan's Run" based on a book?
Is there an old man in the book as in the movie?
Are there any plot differences between the book and the movie?
See more »
27 out of 39 people found the following review useful.
Whether you're Green, Red,or Over 30 This is Great Sci-Fi!!!, 15 January 2004
Author: Adam Bernstein (adambernstein60s@gmail.com) from Northwest, USA

Logan's Run is an excellent stylish sci-fi film from 1975 starring the great Michael York and the beautiful Jenny Agutter. It blew my mind seeing it as an 11-year-old and was so obsessed with it my mother used to say, "He thinks everything's the 23rd century". Logan 5 (York) is a Sandman who kills runners, people who reach the age of 30, but reject the chance to Renew on Carousel. As the film begins we see the cool domed city with Jerry Goldsmith's futuristic trippy soundtrack. In this world mainly filmed in a Fort Worth mall everyone has a life-clock and when they reach 30 it starts to blink red. Those who believe in renewal attend the Last Day ritual when the 30-year-olds come out with hoods and masks, then "Identify...be strong and you will be renewed" says the female computer voice. They disrobe to reveal tights with Evel Knievel designs and start to spin around and float up and blow up to the cheers of the crowd.

Logan and his friend Francis (Richard Jordan) go on a hunt for runners killing them with fire spewing guns. Then Logan finds an Anck key and the master computer makes him search for Sanctuary by posing as a runner (some reviews of this film say Logan is 30, but he's "4-years-away", i.e. 26--York was really 32 though).

The best thing about this is the stylish futuristic designs, the great believable acting of the stars, and the off-the-wall nonsensical speech of the senile old man (Peter Ustinov). And there's some great adventure as Logan and Jessica are chased out of the city by Francis through the labyrinthine subsystems, Box the crazy robot, and a beautiful ice cave scene. And for us guys our favorite line is "we better take our clothes off before they freeze", kind of weird that they put them back on, but our wish throughout the film comes true with a quick glimpse of Jenny Agutter disrobed. Actually there is a fully nude scene here with them in each others' arms while Box sculpts them as per the book, alas it was cut from the film for a PG rating. I never did quite get what Box was supposed to be.

The plot itself has some serious inconsistencies. In the book the age for Renewal was 21, and the author got the idea from '60s youth culture (it was written in 1967). The idea was that youth would take over and get rid of all adults. The reason for the change to age 30 is the stars would be unbelievable as 20 year olds. You have to make many leaps over logic to suspend your disbelief here. You could say the city used this as population control. The idea of Renewal, well you can believe in reincarnation, but in this world it's implied Renewal means some scientific process controlled by the computer. When the computer tells Logan there are 1056 unaccounted for runners he says "no one's ever been renewed?!" However his conclusion cannot be logically drawn from information on unaccounted for runners.

In the cool "surrogation" scene with Logan in multiple hologram images saying "There is Noooooo Sanctuary", his answer does not compute so the city blows up....or was it his shooting the computer with his gun...or both. Here's a way to rationalize it though: the computer has a secret program to destroy the city when someone prefers life outside the dome...the purpose of shelter for what's left of humanity is fulfilled and it's time for them to go "outside". And how they get outside the city to meet the old man so quickly and without a scratch on them is beyond me. But I felt at the end, what happens now? That cool city of sex, drugs, and cool carousel ritual is gone. As Francis said, "Is this good, is this what you want?!" Now they are free to scrounge for survival and grow old and decrepid. I believe in the book it wasn't an enclosed city, it was the whole world. I wonder what the world outside the DC area was like in the film's backstory.

Bottom line is the film is great not because of the plot, but because of the creativity and style. It won a special academy award for special effects and it's a true classic. Michael York still gets people who come up to him telling him Logan's Run was their favorite film of his (even with all the other great roles he's had). And the rumors are flying about a remake! I'm working on a screenplay now to submit.

Was the above review useful to you?
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Fantasy Imagery To Reinfore A Conformist Message LauraJ1234
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The Carousel DoubleRD77
Flirting with greatness mclaughlinconnor338
Were bras banned in the 23rd century? SelectorSwitch
THAT was the plan??? mkohary
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