Le locataire
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The Tenant (1976) More at IMDbPro »Le locataire (original title)


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

4 items from 2016


Andrew Dominik’s 10 Favorite Films

27 May 2016 11:40 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Across his three features this century, Andrew Dominik has explored masculine ideals (and the lack thereof) with an uncompromising vision. While earning the most acclaim for his stunning western The Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert Ford, his follow-up Killing Them Softly is also distinctive in its laser-focused fury, getting the impressive distinction of an “F” CinemaScore to cement it as something truly special. His long-gestating next feature, Blonde, is hopefully still happening (the last we heard, Netflix may back it and shooting could begin as early as this year), but as we wait for confirmation, today we’re looking at his favorite films of all-time.

Courtesy of his Sight & Sound ballot, it’s a primarily American-focused line-up with classics from Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, Billy Wilder, and David Lynch (x2). Perhaps most interesting is his favorite Alfred Hitchcock film, one of the man’s last five features: Marnie, »

- Jordan Raup

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New on Video: ‘What?’

19 May 2016 3:36 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

What?

Written by Gérard Brach, Roman Polanski

Directed by Roman Polanski

Italy/France/Germany, 1972

You can forgive Roman Polanski if he wanted to take things easy in 1972 and make a light-hearted, frivolous little movie. Less than two years removed from the grisly Manson family murders that took from the acclaimed filmmaker his wife and unborn child, Polanski first confronted his troubled demons with a suitably grim adaptation of Macbeth (1971). After that, apparently ready for solace of a livelier variety, he and a motley crew of friends and associates set sail for Carlo Ponti’s extravagant Italian villa. There they made the peculiarly disappointing What?, a raucous sex comedy without much sex and with very little comedy.

What? begins as globe-trotting Nancy (Sydne Rome) has hitched a ride with some Italian natives. As she speaks of her touristic adventures, the men in the car are more focused on her palpable sexuality. »

- Jeremy Carr

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Scale the Best Films Taking Place in a High-Rise

13 May 2016 11:54 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

What is it about towering apartment buildings that fascinates filmmakers, especially those working in horror, sci-fi, and fantasy? It’s easy to imagine these eyesores of urban development — especially those with secured entrances and exclusive tenants — harboring sinister secrets inside their walls.

High-Rise, director Ben Wheatley adaptation’s of J.G. Ballard‘s eponymous sci-fi novel, more than fits into this strange subset of films, as it focuses on dystopian class warfare inside a monolithic beast of Brualist architecture. With the film now in theaters (and on VOD), we look at other other films that imagine the incredible, horrifying, or supernatural happenings in and around these deceptively unassuming structures.

Apartment Trilogy (Roman Polanski)

Has any set of films turned the usual drudgeries of apartment living — climbing up your stairs for the umpteenth time, dealing with troubled amenities, and trying your best to acknowledge neighbors’ existence without getting the least bit involved »

- TFS Staff

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What?

6 May 2016 7:25 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

What is this -- a naughty sex odyssey as absurdist art? Or a non-pc slice of sleazy art film exploitation? Either way it's a (minor) Polanski masterpiece of direction, influenced by the Italian setting. Is what turns Polanski on? The entire excercise is a Kafka comedy of erotic discomfort. What? Blu-ray Severin 1972 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 110 min. / Che? / Street Date April 26, 2016 / 29.95 Starring Marcello Mastroianni, Sydne Rome, Hugh Griffith, Guido Alberti, Gianfranco Piacentini, Romollo Valli. Cinematography Marcello Gatti, Giuseppe Ruzzolini Production Design Aurelio Crugnola Film Editor Alastair McIntyre Original Music Claudio Gizzi Written by Gérard Brach, Roman Polanski Produced by Carlo Ponti Directed by Roman Polanski

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

It's a slippery slope, I tell you: art films are the gateway to surrealism, and surrealism connects straight to bondage and kinky costume play, which is a direct conduit either to Comic-Con or being forced to resign from the P.T.A. »

- Glenn Erickson

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

4 items from 2016


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