The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane (1976) - News Poster

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Horror-on-Sea 2018 Interview: Mj Dixon on ‘Mask of Thorn’

Mask of Thorn is a throwback to the classic 80 slashers from writer and director Mj Dixon, which has been selected to play at the Horror-on-Sea Film Festival on Friday 19th January. I got chance to ask Mj a few questions about the continuing legacy of Thorn, his influences in horror and what else is coming in the ever expanding Mycho horror universe.

What can we expect from the film?

I guess it’s hard to say without giving too much away, but we usually try to take the classic slasher formula that the Mychoverse is built on and then turn it upside down and at least approach it from a very different angle. We’re not really interested in making the same film again and again, so it was important find a fresh way to tell the next part of the story. I guess the influences for the film were
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

What’s Coming to Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime in November 2017

What’s Coming to Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime in November 2017
November may mean the end of Halloween, but that doesn’t mean that the creepy fun has to end as Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon continue to add some freaky films to November’s list of streaming content.

Netflix will start the month off with films like “Oculus” and “Silent Hill” for fans of big scares and “Casper” and “Scary Movie” for those who looking for a milder way to keep the Halloween spirit alive, and will also add in “9” and “Piranha” later in the month. For those who would rather leave the October spookiness behind, science fiction comedies like “Chappie” and “Men in Black” or family-friendly films like “Charlotte’s Web” and “The Boss Baby” should make for fun movie nights.

Hulu will also keep the frights coming with offerings like “Bram Stoker’s Dracula” and “Beowulf,” but will also get a headstart on the winter holiday season with “Christmas with the Cranks,” Happy Christmas,” and collection
See full article at Variety - Film News »

  • CinemaRetro
Issue #37 (January 2017)

Steven J. Rubin's 40th anniversary tribute to "Rocky"; extensive coverage On the making of this landmark film with exclusive comments from key members of the cast and crew. 

Christopher Weedman celebrates the career of British actress Anne Heywood with insights from the lady herself.

Diane Rodgers' homage to the Monkees' only feature film, "Head"- with a screenplay by Jack Nicholson!

Martin Gainsford diagnoses the problems of bringing Doc Savage to the big screen in the ill-fated 1970s production.

Nick Anez extols the virtues of Sidney Lumet's brilliant but little-scene "The Offence" with a powerhouse performance by Sean Connery.

Tim Greaves examines the creepy-but-neglected chiller "The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane" starring young Jodie Foster.

Did Sergio Leone "ghost direct" the cult Italian Western "My Name is Nobody"? Chris Button examines the case for and against this theory.

Raymond Benson works overtime, providing us with
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Off The Shelf – Episode 89 – New Blu-ray and DVD Releases for Tuesday, May 10th 2016

In this episode of Off The Shelf, Ryan and Brian take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for Tuesday, May 10th 2016.

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Follow-Up Shout Select Operation Dumbo Drop? Bill Hunt on Uhd Bd Cat People News Arrow Video: David Cronenberg’s Early Works (UK Only), The Complete Count Yorga (UK Only), Kinji Fukasaku films (Individual Releases), Microwave Massacre, The Bloodstained Butterfly Kino Lorber: Trouble Man, Witchcraft, Freeway (1988) Scorpion/Kino: Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen Fabulous Films (UK): June 6th: Brewster’s Millions, Dragnet, King Ralph, The Jetsons Movie, Cheech and Chong’s Next Movie Links to Amazon Back Roads Classic Hitchcock Deadpool Eisenstein in Guanajuato Father of the Bride Gabo: The Creation of Gabriel Garcia Marquez I Don’t Belong Anywhere: The Cinema of Chantal Akerman In a Lonely Place The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane
See full article at CriterionCast »

11 Good Movies to Watch on Hulu for April 2016

That’s right. Hulu. I’m here to tell you that there’s a cinematic streaming goldmine available on Hulu that includes recent hits, older classics, domestic releases, and foreign imports. It’s even home to hundreds of Criterion titles. Sure there’s plenty of filler and seemingly thousands of titles I’ve never heard of before, but I’m not here to talk about possible gems like Nocturnal Agony… I’m here to recommend some good movies to watch this month on Hulu. Pick of the Month: ’71 (2014) A young British soldier (Jack O’Connell) enters the street of 1971 Belfast in an attempt to keep the peace, but when a riot breaks out and he’s accidentally left behind what he finds is anything but peaceful. This is a crackerjack thriller that brings tension and suspense to what’s in some ways a modern(-ish) update of The Naked Prey. O
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Canadian Masterpiece The Little Girl Who Lives Down The Lane Coming to Blu-ray

Dark melodrama starring Jodie Foster set for Blu-ray release. More sophisticated horror film fans will no doubt be thrilled by the news that Kino Lorber is planning to release one of the most delicate, challenging and confounding horror movies of the 1970s. That picture is director Nicolas Gessner’s 1977 adaptation of Laird Koenig’s novel…

The post Canadian Masterpiece The Little Girl Who Lives Down The Lane Coming to Blu-ray appeared first on Shock Till You Drop.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »

The Eyes of My Mother | 2016 Sundance Film Festival Review

And Soon the Darkness: Pesce’s Debut a Superbly Stylized Nightmare

If Portugal were the portal to some Lynchian netherworld of dreams deferred, it would look something like Nicolas Pesce’s sumptuously grotesque directorial debut, The Eyes of My Mother. A striking palette of black and white cinematography from Zach Kuperstein recalls the scarred, destitute lives from the ruins of Arturo Ripstein’s filmography, a macabre yet uncharacteristically sound portrait of psychological unraveling. We all know the kind of potent degeneration to be fashioned on isolated farmhouses where dysfunctional children are paired with musings of surgical practices, as seen in films from Haneke or even last year’s Goodnight Mommy. Pesce, who previously directed multiple music videos, as well as assistant editor on Josh Mond’s James White (2015), debuts a spectacularly gruesome calling card which may deconstruct the notion of the physical lens through which living beings observe the world,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Top 5 Films about Killer Kids

Sure, children are our future. But what if they turn out to be our demise? Whether kids are compelled to murder through the extremity of a situation or because they are seemingly rotten to the core, the idea that precious innocence can be twisted into something hideously unrecognizable continues to be a terrifying trope of the horror genre. Here is a list of movies where creepy little hands commit unspeakable deeds.

5. The Bad Seed

Written by John Lee Mahin, Maxwell Anderson, and William March

Written by Mervyn LeRoy

USA, 1956

The Bad Seed’s Rhonda (Patty McCormack) is a pig-tailed little girl who threatens, hurts, and murders anyone who hinders her from getting every whim. Although the film skirts around this truth for too long, it is clear from the beginning that she is the culprit of any pain being inflicted. The movie contains lengthy intervals where almost nothing happens, but
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Alice, Sweet Alice DVD Review

Director: Alfred Sole,

Starring: Linda Miller, Paula E. Sheppard, Niles McMaster, Jane Lowry, Rudolph Willrich, Mildred Clinton, Alphonso DeNoble, Michael Hardstark, Brooke Shields,

Running Time: 106 Minutes

Certificate: 18

Extras: Audio Commentary with director and editor, alternative title sequence,

Every once in a while you find yourself coming across a film you’ve never heard of. You just assume it’s a generic entry into a crowded genre and you put it on not expecting much. That film ends up blowing you away, offering one of the greatest examples of its ilk, while simultaneously forcing you to question why it isn’t a staple classic. Alice, Sweet Alice is one such film, a delicious 1970s horror in the vein of Don’T Look Now, Picnic At Hanging Rock, and The Little Girl Who Lives Down The Lane.

Alice, Sweet Alice sees a family preparing for the first communion of their youngest daughter,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

31 Days of Horror (Killer Kids): Top 5 Films about Killer Kids

Sure, children are our future. But what if they turn out to be our demise? Whether kids are compelled to murder through the extremity of a situation or because they are seemingly rotten to the core, the idea that precious innocence can be twisted into something hideously unrecognizable continues to be a terrifying trope of the horror genre. Here is a list of movies where creepy little hands commit unspeakable deeds.

5. The Bad Seed

Written by John Lee Mahin, Maxwell Anderson, and William March

Written by Mervyn LeRoy

USA, 1956

The Bad Seed’s Rhonda (Patty McCormack) is a pig-tailed little girl who threatens, hurts, and murders anyone who hinders her from getting every whim. Although the film skirts around this truth for too long, it is clear from the beginning that she is the culprit of any pain being inflicted. The movie contains lengthy intervals where almost nothing happens, but
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Rewind: ‘The Little Girl Who Lives Down The Lane’ Review (1976)

Stars: Jodie Foster, Martin Sheen, Alexis Smith, Mort Shuman, Scott Jacoby | Written by Laird Koenig | Directed by Nicolas Gessner

Based on a novel by Laird Koenig and directed by Nicolas Gessner, The Little Girl Who Lives Down The Lane is a strange film, and one that I’ve been meaning to watch for quite some time. Released in 1976 and starring a 14 year old Jodie Foster, the film is macabre, dark, unsettling and even more importantly, underrated. I rarely hear people talk about this film. Now maybe I’m just looking in the wrong places for discussions about it, but I haven’t heard anyone really mention their feelings about it in the past.

The film follows the character of Rynn (Foster), a 13 year old girl who lives in a large secluded house in a small American seaside town. She keeps to herself, doesn’t venture to town for groceries and doesn’t go to school.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Kid-Thing | Review

Another Little Girl Down the Lane…

While the latest feature length film from the Zellner Brothers, Kid-Thing, may not be meant for children, its stammered nature definitely plays itself out as an adolescent affair. Their latest feature (after 2008’s comedic Goliath) is set in the Texas countryside, right outside of Austin, certainly a locale primed for ominous and terrifying happenings. Yet one can’t help but feel that the opaque and ambiguous tone of their latest effort squanders an excellent opportunity to have been a better film.

At the center of Kid-Thing is the 10 year old Annie (Sydney Aguirre), a motherless child left to her own devices while her goat farmer father (Nathan Zellner) engages in demolition derby and wastes a considerable amount of time engaging in inane activities with his equally simple friend, Caleb (David Zellner). A gas leak at her school has forced it to close for an
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Kevin Fraser’s Poster Friday Vol. VIII

There are so many films in existence right now, and they’re growing in number every day. A person can never watch them all and that’s slightly depressing to me. I’ll probably die without having seen some classic film that slipped me by. As I lay on my deathbed, I’ll confess this to my children. I won’t know their names because I was too busy watching movies their whole lives. Yep, I’ll be a good father.

Check out these cool posters for films I’ve never heard of and never seen!

I came across this poster for The Little Girl Who Lives Down The Lane and just had to include it. I’d never heard of this film before, it’s got an impressive cast and seems interesting so I’m not sure why this is my first encounter. The poster itself isn’t really even that well done,
See full article at City of Films »

Here Are 9 Thriller Recommendations For Horror Fans

  • FEARnet
Here Are 9 Thriller Recommendations For Horror Fans
Back when I manned the horror section of the video store I worked at, anytime I’d find a customer skimming through all the “S” titles with mild frustration, 99 percent of the time, I knew exactly what it was they were looking for. And when I would finally ask, my suspicions were confirmed. “Do you have ‘The Silence Of The Lamb’”? To which I’d always reply, “Ah, the Hannibal Lector movies are all in the ‘mystery/thriller’ section.” And usually this would spur a conversation with that customer that would begin with, “Really? I always thought the Hannibal Lector movies were horror!” And it got me thinking about a handful of other titles that horror fans might not even think to hunt for in the “mystery/thriller” section. There are the obvious choices like Se7en or Misery. Then, there’s also stuff like The Sixth Sense, which yes,
See full article at FEARnet »

Golden Globes 2013: Tina Fey's Magic, Amy Poehler's Glamor, and the Inward Outing of Jodie Foster

It's only January 14, but I guarantee that the 2013 Golden Globes will be the best awards show of the entire year. Why? Because the Golden Globes are gloriously useless, and its attendees are aware of that fact. That's why everyone onscreen appears to be having a great, fun time filled with unrehearsed moments. The Golden Globes combine the gaudiness of "Night of 100 Stars" with the hilarious posturing of a student council election. Frankly, we should call them the Pia Zadora's Choice Awards. Respect. Or don't! Both options are completely acceptable and fun.

Tina Fey and Amy Poehler were your ravishing emcees, and I'd hate to regurgitate what everyone has said (and has been saying) about these deeply, heroically funny women, but whatever: They were flawless. Sharp, gentle, biting, and irreverent, and always at surprising moments. I slapped the wall during the opening monologue (duologue?) when Tina said that Ricky Gervais
See full article at The Backlot »

In Honor of Jodie Foster's Lifetime Achievement Award, Let's Pick Her 5 Most Underrated Achievements in Film

Jodie Foster will be the newest recipient of the Golden Globes' Cecil B. De Mille Lifetime Achievement Award this winter, which makes her one of the youngest to take the title. (Judy Garland was 39, for the record -- Foster is 49.) As long as I've watched movies, I've found Foster a singular and interesting presence on film. I can't say that about many former child stars. Though if Tiffany Brissette wants to star in robo-version of Nell any time soon, I guarantee I'll be the first in line.

To honor Foster's achievement, I thought we'd highlight her lesser-known achievements. Here are my five favorite tidbits.

1. She beat Meryl, Glenn, Thelma, and Louise at the Oscars.

The two-time Oscar winner picked up Best Actress statuettes for 1988's The Accused (which, I have to say, is a dated, melodramatic joke of a movie) and The Silence of the Lambs (which is only the
See full article at The Backlot »

The Way Review

Martin Sheen is a treasure. Now 71 years of age, it's impossible to look at him and not think of Kit, the polite murderer he played in Terrence Malick's Badlands, or Willard, the military assassin in Francis Coppola's Apocalypse Now, or the creep who menaced Jodie Foster in The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane, or his performances in memorable movies made directly for television (The Execution of Private Slovik, The California Kid, The Missiles of October). He was charm and evil incarnate in David Cronenberg's The Dead Zone. When he returned to television as President Jed Bartlet in The West Wing, he left another mark as the kind of political leader who everyone dreams existed in real life. And he was a vital...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Bad Movies We Love: Jodie Foster in The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane

Bad Movies We Love: Jodie Foster in The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane
I know there are important movies coming out this week like X-Men: X Marks the Suck, so forgive me for blowing off new releases when choosing today's Bad Movie. Truth is, I've been thinking about the star of next week's huge debut, Super 8's venerable Elle Fanning, and the merits of child actresses as a species. Why do child actresses rule? Or do they? Do we reward them for their raw abilities or for acting like pocket versions of adults (and therefore, ourselves)? I'm steering this train of thought back to the greatest kid thespian of all time, Jodie Foster, and a weird movie she made in 1976 called The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane. Have you heard of it? It's about being 13, matching wits with a pedophile played by Martin Sheen, killing some lady, and befriending a teenage magician. Gawk with me.
See full article at Movieline »

Motion Picture Purgatory: The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane

1976 was a great year for horror fans. The Omen, Carrie, Assault on Precinct 13, Island of the Damned, Burnt Offerings. The list goes on and on. It also included the subject of Trembles' Motion Picture Purgatory this week: The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane starring Jodie Foster and Martin Sheen. Remember it?

Synopsis:

Rynn Jacobs is a thirteen-year-old girl who lives in a secluded house that she and her father have rented in a quiet seaside community. But whenever anybody from the town tries to satisfy their curiosity, Rynn's father is never around, and it seems as if the girl is all alone. Rynn's resourcefulness is put to the test as several people try to find out what she might be hiding, including the snobby landlady and her sleazy son.

“Self-preservation augmentation!”

Discuss Motion Picture Purgatory in the comments section below!
See full article at Dread Central »

Jodie Foster: Hot Hollywood Celebrity Photo Gallery of the Day

HollywoodNews.com: Our selected celebrity to be included in our “Hot Hollywood Celebrity Photo Gallery of the Day” is Jodie Foster. She just premiered her new movie “The Beaver” in Cannes.

Jodie Foster ◄ Back Next ►Picture 1 of 11

Jodie Foster - 64th Annual Cannes Film Festival - "The Beaver"

◄ Back Next ►Picture 1 of 11

Jodie Foster - 64th Annual Cannes Film Festival - "The Beaver"

Alicia Christian “Jodie” Foster (born November 19, 1962) is an American actress, film director, producer as well as being a former child actress.

Foster began acting in commercials at three years of age, and her first significant role came in the 1976 film Taxi Driver as the preteen prostitute Iris for which she received a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Also that year, she starred in the cult film The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane. She won an Academy Award for Best Actress in
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »
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