7.1/10
10,552
101 user 79 critic

The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane (1976)

13-year-old Rynn Jacobs lives alone in a high-class Quebec small town, but unknown to the neighbors, she is leading a secret and dangerous life.

Director:

(as Nicholas Gessner)

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
...
Mort Shuman ...
...
...
Town Hall Clerk
Clesson Goodhue ...
Bank Manager
Hubert Noël ...
Bank Clerk (as Hubert Noel)
Jacques Famery ...
Bank Clerk
Mary Morter ...
Teller
Julie Wildman ...
Teller
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Storyline

Rynn Jacobs is a thirteen-year-old girl who lives in a secluded house that she and her father have rented in a quiet seaside community. But whenever anybody from the town tries to satisfy their curiosity, Rynn's father is never around, and it seems as if the girl is all alone. Rynn's resourcefulness is put to the test as several people try to find out what she might be hiding, including the snobby landlady and her sleazy son. Written by acidxian

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Ask Her No Questions And Nobody Dies. See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

26 January 1977 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Das Mädchen am Ende der Straße  »

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Box Office

Budget:

CAD 1,100,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Eleven years later, co-stars Martin Sheen and Jodie Foster both appeared in Siesta (1987). See more »

Goofs

Towards the end of the movie, Frank Hallet places the needle on an LP record and classical music is heard. While they are drinking tea, Frank asks Rynn what the music is and she replies, "Chopin, Piano Concerto No. 1." As all vinyl LP's had labels in the center which indicated which work/s of music was/were on them, Frank should have known it was Chopin's First Piano Concerto without having to ask Rynn. See more »

Quotes

Rynn: Maybe you don't understand about poets: Edgar Allen Poe was a drug addict, Dylan Thomas drank himself to death, Sylvia Plath took her own life.
Miglioriti: Rynn, we're talking about your father.
Rynn: Yeah well, sometimes my father goes into his room and locks the door, keeps something in a desk drawer, I don't know what it is. I know when he locks that door, he doesn't want me to see the way he becomes, you know?
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Crazy Credits

Rynn sits staring at Frank Hallet through the entire ending credits as the fire burns behind her. See more »

Connections

References Mary Poppins (1964) See more »

Soundtracks

My Dear Mario
Written and Performed by Christian Gaubert Et Son Orchestre
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Not Your Typical Story Line! What a Terrific Off-Beat Thriller.
18 July 2000 | by See all my reviews

Great Suspense and Atmosphere. This movie instantly became one of my all-time favorites and is difficult to describe without giving too much away. More than most movies I can remember, reading too many comments about it's content beforehand can detract from the viewing experience (and a great one at that!) and ruin the suspense. I will try not to give too much about the film away beforehand.

First of all, I loved the production quality, atmosphere and locale. It would be a great movie to see on Halloween night for example, at least in my opinion. It really can be watched anytime however and will be just as great. The acting was high quality, all the way around but especially with Jodie Foster and Martin Sheen and the direction and score are excellent as well.

I had a problem with the plausibility of Jodie Foster's character behaving essentially as an adult. It was a little tough for me to buy into a 13 (or newly turned 14 year old) cooking gourmet meals, serving fine wines, listening to Chopin and generally acting much older than her chronological age.

Even taking into consideration the events in her life which apparently had shaped her personality, she seemed too mature for her age. If you put that concern aside however and accept it as a given premise of the movie you can sit back and enjoy the fun of trying to figure out what's going on.

And trying to figure out what's going on really *is* fun in this movie. Figuring out what's going on with her mysterious father is enough to keep you occupied in itself (if you think you've figured out what's going on with him you will find later that you probably haven't) and that's only one aspect of this complex scenario.

I hate when movies this good are not in general circulation any longer. Brian de Palma's "Sisters" and many other excellent movies also fall into this category. I can't figure out why studios can't figure out ways to continue to make them available to the public, after all...they went to the trouble to make them in the first place.

If you do get a chance to see "Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane" however, jump at it. You aren't likely to be disappointed.


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