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Keoma (1976) More at IMDbPro »

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Keoma -- Franco Nero is KEOMA, a half-breed gunfighter weary of killing as a way of life.
Keoma -- KEOMA stars Nero (Die Hard 2; The Virgin And The Gypsy; Camelot) as the half-breed gunslinger of the title, returning after fighting in the American Civil War to find his home town infected with the plague and under the dictator-like rule of a criminal gang leader named Caldwell. Keoma's return is welcomed by his aged father but resented by his three half-brothers, not least because, against their father's wishes, they are now in the employment of the corrupt Caldwell. Intent on restoring justice to the town, Keoma finds himself up against Caldwell's horde of gangsters and his own flesh and blood in a deadly and ultimately tragic conflict.

Directed with breathtaking visual style and flair by Enzo G. Castellari, KEOMA is a unique, innovative and uncommonly original entry in the Spaghetti Western genre. Featuring powerful performances from a superb cast that also includes Woody Strode (The Quick And The Dead; Once Upon A Time In The West; Spartacus), William Berger (Love Letters Of A Portuguese Nun) and Donald O'Brien (The Name Of The Rose), KEOMA ranks alongside "Django" as one of Franco Nero's finest films.

KEOMA is released on DVD by Argent Films. Special Features include exclusive introduction by acclaimed filmmaker Alex Cox, brand new extensive interview with director Enzo G. Castellari, theatrical trailers, plus "Western Trail" – trailers for Argent's forthcoming spaghetti western releases.


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George Eastman (story)
Mino Roli (screenplay) ...
View company contact information for Keoma on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
25 November 1976 (Italy) See more »
Half-breed Keoma returns to his border hometown after service in the Civil War and finds it under the control of Caldwell... See more » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
KEOMA (Enzo G. Castellari, 1976) *** See more (42 total) »


  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Franco Nero ... Keoma Shannon
William Berger ... William Shannon
Olga Karlatos ... Liza Farrow

Orso Maria Guerrini ... Butch Shannon
Gabriella Giacobbe ... The Witch
Antonio Marsina ... Lenny Shannon

Joshua Sinclair ... Sam Shannon (as John Loffredo)
Donald O'Brien ... Caldwell (as Donald O'Brian)
Leonardo Scavino ... Doctor (as Leon Lenoir)
Wolfango Soldati ... Confederate Soldier
Victoria Zinny ... Brothel Owner
Alfio Caltabiano ... Member of Caldwell's Gang

Woody Strode ... George
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Domenico Cianfriglia ... Member of Caldwell's Gang (uncredited)
Giovanni Cianfriglia ... Gang Member (uncredited)
Pierangelo Civera ... Plague Victim (uncredited)
Arnaldo Dell'Acqua ... Member of Caldwell's Gang (uncredited)
Roberto Dell'Acqua ... Member of Caldwell's Gang (uncredited)
Riccardo Pizzuti ... Gunman (uncredited)
Angelo Ragusa ... Member of Caldwell's Gang (uncredited)
Sergio Ruggeri ... Man Hit in the Saloon (uncredited)
Franco Ukmar ... Confederate Soldier (uncredited)
Massimo Vanni ... Confederate Soldier (uncredited)

Directed by
Enzo G. Castellari 
Writing credits
George Eastman (story) (as Luigi Montefiori)

Mino Roli (screenplay) &
Nico Ducci (screenplay) &
George Eastman (screenplay) (as Luigi Montefiori) &
Enzo G. Castellari (screenplay)

Joshua Sinclair  dialogue (uncredited)

Produced by
Manolo Bolognini .... producer (uncredited)
Original Music by
Guido De Angelis 
Maurizio De Angelis 
Cinematography by
Aiace Parolin 
Film Editing by
Gianfranco Amicucci 
Production Design by
Carlo Simi 
Set Decoration by
Carlo Gentili 
Costume Design by
Massimo Lentini 
Carlo Simi 
Makeup Department
Giusy Bovino .... hair stylist (as Giuseppina Bovino)
Carboni .... wig maker
Alfonso Gola .... makeup artist
Gilberto Provenghi .... assistant makeup artist
Rocchetti .... wig maker
Production Management
Nicolò Forte .... production manager
Carlo Giovagnorio .... unit manager
Stefano Pegoraro .... production manager
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Giuseppe Giglietti .... second assistant director
Rocco Lerro .... assistant director
Art Department
Gilberto Carbonaro .... set constructor
Silvano Natali .... set dresser
Sound Department
Benito Alchimede .... boom operator
Nick Alexander .... dubbing editor (voices: Orso Maria Guerrini)
Tonino Cacciottolo .... sound effects
Bernardino Fronzetti .... sound recordist
Romano Pampaloni .... re-recording engineer
Special Effects by
Giovanni Corridori .... special effects
Rocco Lerro .... stunt coordinator
Angelo Ragusa .... stunt double: Franco Nero
Camera and Electrical Department
Giovanni Bergamini .... camera operator
Massimo Carta .... assistant camera
Maurizio Cipriani .... assistant camera
Guglielmo Maga .... key grip
Bruno Pasqualini .... gaffer
Ermanno Serto .... still photographer: action stills
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Maria Castrignano .... seamstress
Editorial Department
Roberto Amicucci .... assistant editor
Cesarina Casini .... first assistant editor
Other crew
Manolo Bolognini .... presenter
Rocco Lerro .... master of arms
Luigi Scardino .... production accountant
Vivalda Vigorelli .... continuity
Luciano De Ambrosis .... voice dubbing: Riccardo Pizzuti (uncredited)
Manlio De Angelis .... voice dubbing: Joshua Sinclair (uncredited)
Vittoria Febbi .... voice dubbing: Olga Karlatos (uncredited)
Michele Gammino .... voice dubbing: Wolfango Soldati (uncredited)
Antonio Guidi .... voice dubbing: Alfio Catabiano (uncredited)
Renato Mori .... voice dubbing: Donald O'Brien (uncredited)
Angelo Nicotra .... voice dubbing: Antonio Marsina (uncredited)
Glauco Onorato .... voice dubbing: Woody Strode (uncredited)
Giorgio Piazza .... voice dubbing: Leonardo Scavino (uncredited)
Giuseppe Rinaldi .... voice dubbing: William Berger (uncredited)
Vittorio Stagni .... voice dubbing: Massimo Vanni (uncredited)

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Desperado" - USA (cut version)
"Django Rides Again" - USA (informal English title)
"Django's Great Return" - USA (informal English title)
"Keoma: The Avenger" - USA (dubbed version)
See more »
Norway:97 min | Italy:105 min | West Germany:90 min
Color (Eastmancolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Argentina:13 | Australia:MA | Canada:PG (Manitoba/Ontario) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Finland:K-18 (uncut) (self applied) (2007) | Finland:K-16 (cut) (1978) | France:-12 | Hong Kong:IIB | Norway:16 (video rating) | Norway:15 (DVD release) (2007) | Norway:(Banned) (1978-2003) (cinema release) | Singapore:PG | Spain:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:18 | UK:12 (re-rating) (2004 ) (cut) | West Germany:16 (f)

Did You Know?

William Berger is respectively 13, 15, 18 and 25 years older than the actors playing his sons.See more »
The Witch:Why did you come back?
Keoma:The world keeps going around and around. So you always end up in the same place.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in The Irredeemables (2014)See more »
In Front of My DesperationSee more »


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9 out of 12 people found the following review useful.
KEOMA (Enzo G. Castellari, 1976) ***, 8 September 2006
Author: MARIO GAUCI ( from Naxxar, Malta

Director Castellari is nowadays perhaps best-known (if at all) by the younger generation of film buffs for one thing: making the original INGLORIOUS BASTARDS (1977), which Quentin Tarantino has been threatening to remake for years now. However, in my opinion, he should instead be remembered for making this impressive, belated Spaghetti Western gem.

An odd blend of violent action and heady mysticism apparently concocted by one of the credited screenwriters Luigi Montefiori (better known to hardened Euro-Cult fans as an actor under the alias of George Eastman) but, as star Franco Nero and Castellari himself state in the Anchor Bay DVD supplements, the script took so long to get written that they decided to work without one and make the dialogue up as they went along! That the end result is so satisfying (and practically unique in the subgenre) is a remarkable achievement in itself.

Keoma is a half-breed returning home from the American Civil War to find his hometown ravaged by the plague and overtaken by the villainous Caldwell (Donal O' Brien); among his cohorts are Nero's three half-brothers who had made his childhood a living hell, with his surrogate father (William Berger) and colored mentor turned banjo-playing town-drunk (Woody Strode) unable to do much to counter Caldwell's oppression. A Bergmanesque, cadaverous old woman is frequently seen roaming the streets dragging a cart behind her...

What follows is the typical confrontation between Good and Evil but Castellari infuses the familiar mixture with several directorial flourishes: occasionally striking compositions (particularly a memorably Fordian opening shot), frequent use of slow-motion in true Peckinpah-style, flashbacks in which Keoma is a spectator to his own past experiences (inspired by Elia Kazan's THE ARRANGEMENT [1969]!), a touch of elliptical editing, Christian symbolism (Keoma is crucified at one point) and, most distressingly of all, a folksy soundtrack (inspired by Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan, no less and by a shrill, high-pitched female singer and an out-of-tune deep-voiced male) which narrates in song the action we're seeing on the screen. I say distressingly because the Guido and Maurizo De Angelis compositions found here have forever been a thorn in the side of even the film's staunchest admirers!! Personally, I didn't mind the female singer so much after a while but when her (possibly drunk) male companion took over in the last half hour, I was in for some cringe-inducing moments for sure...!

Despite these misgivings, the film is still one of the best Spaghetti Westerns out there (and certainly the last great example of the subgenre); its undoubted highlight is provided by a terrific, lovingly protracted action set-piece in which Nero, Berger and a reformed Strode (back to his former arrow-shooting glory - perhaps a nod to the role he played in Richard Brooks' splendid THE PROFESSIONALS [1966]) wipe out most of Caldwell's gang. Their triumph is short-lived, however, because both Berger and Strode lose their lives in the ongoing struggle (Berger poignantly so, while Strode's death scene is particularly great), with Nero almost bowing out himself under the strain of his siblings' torture - who have subsequently disposed of Caldwell and taken over the town themselves; the final confrontation, then, between Keoma and his three half-brothers is eerily set to the "strains" of Olga Karlatos' (playing a woman Keoma had earlier on saved from a plague-infested colony) wailing and screaming as she lies giving birth to a child amidst the carnage!

While at first I was disappointed that the Anchor Bay DVD only included the English dub, having watched it now it seems clear that the actors were all speaking their dialogue in English on the set - although, as connoisseurs will certainly know, this was all re-recorded back in the studios anyway (as was common practice in the Italian film industry). Still, if ever it gets shown again on Italian TV, I'll be sure to check it out just for completeness' sake. Thankfully, however, Castellari contributes a highly enthusiastic and informative Audio Commentary in which he discusses his major influences while making the film, among them Sidney J. Furie's THE APPALOOSA (1966), Altman's McCABE AND MRS. MILLER (1971) and Peckinpah's PAT GARRETT AND BILLY THE KID (1973).

Ultimately, Franco Nero in the title role is almost as iconic a figure as Django and, hopefully, I should be getting to another fairly obscure but highly intriguing Spaghetti Westen of his - Luigi Bazzoni's MAN, PRIDE AND VENGEANCE (1968), an eccentric updating of Georges Bizet's opera "Carmen", co-starring Klaus Kinski and Tina Aumont - pretty soon...

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i loooooooooooooooove this soundtrack gregoirescherer
Has there ever been worse music made? IndianaSmith
Film was shot in English!!! paololita
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