Burnt Offerings
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006

10 items from 2017


Drive-In Dust Offs: The Sentinel (1977)

23 September 2017 11:27 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

In regards to his filmic output, director Michael Winner was wildly inconsistent at his worst and wholly divisive at his best (and vice versa). The remarkable thing is that those two extreme opinions can be about the same film; some find the kinetic sleaze of Death Wish (1974) powerful and disturbing, others find its ham-fisted social grazing problematic and off-putting. But it was a big hit, so naturally Universal let him ride the satanic tide with The Sentinel (1977), a Good vs. Evil, Portal to Hell potboiler that warms this Fulci-loving heart three years before Lucio even set foot in New Orleans.

Given a limited release in January stateside, The Sentinel barely broke even on its $4 million budget, and the critics hated it, deeming it lurid, reprehensible trash. Which it is; but it’s also ridiculously entertaining and has a few truly haunting moments. Turns out Winner could do horror—and yet »

- Scott Drebit

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Drive-In Dust Offs: The Pyx (1973)

9 September 2017 9:59 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Redemption can be a hard ticket to punch, in real life let alone on film. An arc has to be convincing in a short space of time and make us believe our protagonist’s journey. Thanks to a brilliant performance by Karen Black and a meticulously unfurled plot, The Pyx (1973) offers sorrow and resolution in a gripping package.

Released in September by Cinepix Film Properties in our home and native land, Canada, and by Cinerama Releasing Corporation in the States the following month, The Pyx used Canadian shelter funds not to tell an exploitive tale, but rather a somber character study dressed up as a neo-noir with an occult twist. Not an easy sell to be sure, but does it really matter? At the end of the day, The Pyx is another noble attempt to infuse the genre with unusual strands regardless of the box office receipts. (I mean, my »

- Scott Drebit

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"Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina"

15 August 2017 10:36 AM, PDT | SneakPeek | See recent SneakPeek news »

The latest issue of Archie Comics' "Chilling Adventures of Sabrina", written by Roberto Aguirre Sacasa and illustrated by Robert Hack, with covers by Hack and Matthew Southworth, is available August 16, 2017:

"...in 'Witch-War' Part Two, 'Burnt Offerings'...  

"... 'Edward Spellman', trapped in the body of 'Harvey'...

"...has been reunited with 'Sabrina' and ready to enact his dark agenda..."

"Sabrina the Teenage Witch", published by Archie Comics was created by writer George Gladir and illlustrator Dan DeCarlo, debuting in "Archie's Madhouse #22" (Oct. 1962).

Original premise of the series is that 'Sabrina Spellman' is a 'half-witch', living with her father's two witch sisters, 'Hilda' and 'Zelda Spellman', in the town of 'Greendale'. 

Also living with them is the family pet 'Mr. Salem Saberhagen', a witch turned into a cat as punishment for 'world domination' attempts.

Click the images to enlarge and Sneak Peek "Sabrina The Teenage Witch" »

- Michael Stevens

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DVD Review – House of 1000 Corpses (2003)

30 July 2017 11:30 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

House of 1000 Corpses, 2003.

Directed by Rob Zombie.

Starring Sid Haig, Bill Moseley, Sheri Moon, Karen Black, Tom Towles, Walton Goggins, Matthew McGrory, Rainn Wilson, Erin Daniels, and Dennis Fimple.

Synopsis:

Four young thrill-seekers exploring the backwoods of Texas become the victims of a family of sadistic killers.

With his latest movie 31 recently dividing audiences with its back-to-basics approach, crowdfunded production and the director’s seeming refusal to put out an uncensored cut, Fabulous Films have gone back to the beginning of controversial director/metal icon Rob Zombie’s filmmaking career and reissued his debut feature House of 1000 Corpses on DVD (why is there still no Blu-ray release for the UK?) and what an interesting exercise it is revisiting this offbeat little gem.

Interesting because there are many parallels between this movie and 31 – troubled production and director’s cuts notwithstanding, there are also plenty of narrative similarities – but whereas 31 felt rushed, »

- Amie Cranswick

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First-look preview of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina #8

26 July 2017 9:10 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Archie Comics has unveiled a first look preview of next month’s Chilling Adventures of Sabrina #8, which we have for you here; take a look…

“Witch-war” Part Two, “Burnt Offerings”: Edward Spellman, trapped in Harvey’s body, has been reunited with Sabrina, and is ready to enact his dark agenda!

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina #8 is out on August 16th, priced $3.99. »

- Amie Cranswick

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It Came From The Tube: Dead Of Night (1977)

9 July 2017 9:58 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Dan Curtis and Richard Matheson fit together as comfortable as Pb &J, warm slippers on a cold day, and the best of TV horror. Dead of Night (1977) is the follow up to their critically acclaimed anthology Trilogy of Terror (1975), in which Karen Black starred in three distinct episodes of small screen mayhem. And much like that one, Dead of Night shall always be remembered for a terrifying final tale.

Originally broadcast on March 29th, 1977 on NBC, Dead of Night was Curtis and Matheson’s sixth collaboration of some sort, starting with Curtis producing the arrival of Kolchak and The Night Stalker (1972). And while this isn’t the best of their ventures together, solid performances and strong writing leading up make that final segment worth the wait.

Let’s dust off our TV Guide and see what the duo have in store for us:

Dead Of Night (Tuesday, 9pm, NBC)

Three »

- Scott Drebit

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Newswire: Meet the Sweet, Sweet Lonely Girl in a dreamy Shudder exclusive

5 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Following its premiere at last year’s Fantastic Fest, where we called it “a melancholy, ’70s-set lesbian romance/Gothic horror tale featuring a blond, a brunette, and a mad aunt locked away in her Victorian house,” A.D. Calvo’s atmospheric ghost story Sweet, Sweet Lonely Girl is becoming accessible to a wider audience this week with its debut on all-horror streaming service Shudder. We’ve got an exclusive clip from the film, introducing us to innocent young Adele (Erin Wilhelmi) and her equally archetypal counterpart, the mysterious, striking Beth (Quinn Shephard):

Recommended for fans of slow-burn ‘70s horror films like Burnt Offerings and Let’s Scare Jessica To Death, Sweet, Sweet Lonely Girl is streaming on Shudder now.

»

- Katie Rife

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Let Us Now Praise The Mad Genius Of Richard Harland Smith

2 April 2017 3:09 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

A few years ago, in commemoration of the 10th anniversary of the death of influential film critic Pauline Kael, I wrote the following:

“I think (Kael) did a lot to expose the truth… that directors, writers and actors who often work awfully close to the surface may still have subterranean levels of achievement or purpose or commentary that they themselves may be least qualified to articulate. It’s what’s behind her disdain for Antonioni’s pontificating at the Cannes film festival; it’s what behind the high percentage of uselessness of proliferating DVD commentaries in which we get to hear every dull anecdote, redundant explication of plot development and any other inanity that strikes the director of the latest Jennifer Aniston rom-com to blurt out breathlessly; and it is what’s behind a director like Eli Roth, who tailors the subtext of something like Hostel Part II almost as »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Drive-In Dust Offs: The Manitou (1978)

25 March 2017 11:46 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

When I think of some of my favorite B films of the 1970s, my mind tends to drift towards the works of the late filmmaker William Girdler. This man made nine movies in six years before his tragic death in ’78 at the age of thirty; chief among them Abby (’74), Grizzly (’76), and Day of the Animals (’77). Now, quantity obviously doesn’t equal quality, and he made a few outright stinkers. But he was exciting to me because he became a better, more confident filmmaker with each film; this is especially evident with his final release, The Manitou (1978), your typical ancient Native American little person demon growing out of the back of a woman’s neck who fights the heroes in space with laser beams kind of flick. You know the type.

Independently produced, The Manitou was released by Avco Embassy in late April, with a June rollout across North America, and worldwide the following year. »

- Scott Drebit

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It Came From The Tube: The Night Stalker (1972)

26 February 2017 12:00 PM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Sometimes it’s hard to put a fresh coat of paint on an old house. The colors can bleed through no matter how many new layers are added, giving the house a look of desperation from a block away. But sometimes the right paint is used, the restoration is done with love and affection, and the new owners actually care about their surroundings. Such is the case with The Night Stalker (1972), the ABC TV movie that took the vampire out of his crumbling castle and transported him to the seedier side of the modern day Las Vegas strip; and in doing so created one of the most endearingly reluctant monster hunters of all time, Carl Kolchak.

Originally airing as the ABC Movie of the Week on Tuesday, January 11th, 1972, The Night Stalker slayed the competition in the ratings, including CBS’s successful Hawaii Five-o/Cannon lineup. And I mean destroyed »

- Scott Drebit

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006

10 items from 2017


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