L'argent de poche
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Small Change (1976) More at IMDbPro »L'argent de poche (original title)


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009

4 items from 2014


Watch: 2-Part, 80-Minute Documentary 'François Truffaut: The Man Who Loved Cinema'

14 October 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

“Is cinema more important than life?” That question was once asked by Francois Truffaut, the former Cahiers du cinema critic and pioneering member of the French New Wave who directed over twenty-three feature films over the course of his long and fruitful career. His pictures range from coming-of-age dramas (the immortal “400 Blows”), jazzy gangster noirs (“Shoot the Piano Player!”), evocative slices of 1960’s Bohemian life (“Jules and Jim”), light comedy (“Stolen Kisses,” “Bed and Board”), fantastical childhood yarns (“Small Change,” “The Wild Child”) and many more. His understanding of the language of cinema and how genre could ultimately be utilized to service a story that addressed universal concerns was eclipsed only by his deep and unrelenting love for his characters. Truffaut was, above all, a consummate humanist and his devotion to sincerity above all things has put him at a point of contrast with many of his contemporaries from the »

- Nicholas Laskin

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Abu Dhabi unveils Emirates competition films

22 September 2014 5:12 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Women directors make up 70% of competition films.

Abu Dhabi Film Festival (Adff) (Oct 23-Nov 1) has announced the selection for this year’s Emirates Film Competition (Efc).

The upcoming edition of the competition features a total of 53 films, of which 37 films are directed by women, across a variety of genres.

The line up also features films by Emirati filmmakers such as Nasser Al Tamimi’s Female Scream, Nasser Al-Yaqoubi’s Haneen, Hassan Kiyani’s Marwan The Boxer and Ali Mostafa’s musical Rise. In addition, Sarah Al Agroobi’s Super Lochal is among the selected films.

Desire by Hala Matar (Bahrain, starring Johnny Knoxville) has been selected for Adff’s Short Film Competition along with Koshk, from Emirati director Abdullah Al-Kaabi. These two films will participate in both Efc and the Short Film Competition.

Highly anticipated films from the Gcc region include Now Showing directed by Abdullah Al Daihani (Kuwait), Rainbow directed by Mahmood Al-Shaikh (Bahrain) and 623 directed »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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'Bill Murray Day' Celebrated at the Toronto International Film Festival

6 September 2014 9:02 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

While many consider Groundhog Day to be an annual celebration to the hilarious and distinguished career of Bill Murray, the Toronto International Film Festival officially declared September 5th as "Bill Murray Day," and the fest and its attendees paid tribute to the comedian with a retrospective of his work (including screenings of Ghostbusters and Stripes), a Q&A session, and the world premiere of Murray's latest film St. Vincent with Melissa McCarthy.

A sudden burst of heavy rain attempted to mar "Bill Murray Day" in the Canadian city as hundreds of fans became soaked, »

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Boyhood’

20 January 2014 9:24 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Everything and nothing happens over the course of Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood.” Filmed in sequence across 12 years, this unprecedented experiment in long-term storytelling attempts to capture child actor Ellar Coltrane’s coming-of-age on camera, while stubbornly resisting the impulse to impose artificial drama on his relatively typical Texan adolescence. The tradeoff is a nearly three-hour film with little narrative thrust beyond the inevitable passage of time. That’s plenty for Linklater, who has had years to digest and accept creative decisions that might elude first-time viewers. Critical support, coupled with audiences’ natural curiosity about the stunt, should translate to reasonable business for this brave IFC-backed project, which challenges popular notions of dramatic development.

These days, Hollywood mostly subscribes to Alfred Hitchcock’s philosophy, “What is drama, after all, but life with the dull bits cut out?” By contrast, Linklater embraces those dull bits, treating milestones and banal moments with equal weight, »

- Peter Debruge

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009

4 items from 2014


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