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All the President's Men (1976) Poster

Goofs

Revealing mistakes 

When Woodward is handed a photo, the woman who hands him the folder looks toward the camera as she walks off, as if to make sure she's no longer in the shot.
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Anachronisms 

Though the movie is set in 1972, a post-1975 Ford Granada drives past as Woodward is making his first phone call to Deep Throat.
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When Woodward is first shown typing a story, a scene that takes place in June, 1972, a copy of "The Almanac of American Politics" is seen on his desk. However, it's the 1974 edition of the Almanac, which would not be published for another year and a half after the scene took place.
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Above the desk of Carl Bernstein is a large button with the "Baltimore Bullets", NBA logo. The Baltimore Bullets did not move to the Washington D.C. area until the October 1974 season. The film covers the period from June 1972 until the January 1973. Displaying support for a sports team from the city of Baltimore would have been considered gauche by the district's sports fans in the early-1970s.
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Audio/visual unsynchronised 

(at around 40 mins) Woodward and Bernstein in a distant shot in the newsroom: Bernstein continues talking without pause while twice taking sips from his coffee.
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When Bob Woodward first appears in court to cover the appearance of the men caught at Watergate, the voice of actor George Wyner was dubbed over the voice of the first lawyer Woodward is actually talking to in the scene.
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While reviewing the contents of Dardas's file in the District Attorney's office.
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Boom mic visible 

At bottom left, when Bradlee calls out "Woodstein!"
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Character error 

When Bernstein is interviewing Judy Hobeck she says that in a 2 day period, 6 million dollars came in. When Woodward and Bernstein were going over the notes of the interview, Bernstein says that in a 6 day period, 6 million dollars came in.
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Continuity 

The overhead shots of Woodward's car driving out of the parking ramp on two occasions, weeks apart show the same people coming and going on the sidewalk and all the same cars parked the same way in the garage.
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When Woodward and Bernstein are in Woodward's apartment, and Bernstein throws Woodward a cookie, Woodward puts it down, and the position of the cookie on the desk changes repeatedly between shots.
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As Bernstein is waiting to see Dardis, a man enters and is told by the secretary to go in and that he's expecting him. But moments later after Bernstein tricks the secretary and barges into Dardis' office, the man is gone but was never seen leaving.
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When Bernstein and Woodward meet in Sloan's house the cushions on the sofa alter position between shots.
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When Woodward and Bernstein visit Judy Hoback to press for confirmation of her information, there is an iced tea pitcher on the table where she sits. The liquid level in the pitcher noticeably fluctuates from shot to shot.
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When Woodward and Bernstein are discussing how to go about getting the bookkeeper to tell all, at Bernstein's apartment, Bernstein grabs a cookie from a jar and throws it to Woodward. Bernstein's own cookie is in his right hand but then turns into a cigarette, then a cookie again, then nothing, then a cookie, then a cigarette...
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When Carl Bernstein interviews Segretti in his apartment, the two go out onto Segretti's balcony. When Bernstein sits down his arms are on the armrests of the chair. Then suddenly he has his right hand tucked into his pants and in his left hand he is holding a lit cigarette.
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When Woodward is working during the TV announcement of Nixon's appointment as Republican candidate, there is a jump cut. This coincides with a cut in the TV coverage.
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When Woodward and Bernstein go to see the bookkeeper the level in the pitcher of tea changes from front to back camera shots. Also the newspaper in the front of the pitcher appears and disappears between camera shots.
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A brief sequence shows a 1972 Chevrolet Caprice (with four rectangular taillights) transporting a bundle of Washington Post newspapers through nighttime Washington to the White House, at least until the very last close-up shot of it passing through the gates of the White House, where it abruptly changes to a 1973 Chevy Bel Air (with two square taillights).
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Woodward is typing up a story late in the film and the close-up of the typewriter paper shows the word "criticise". When the wire teletype is printing his story minutes later, it reads "criticize," the difference being the British vs. American spellings.
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During Bernstein's conversation with Sharon Lyons, her hair changes repeatedly: at one point it will be windblown and hanging in front of her shoulders, in the next shot freshly brushed and pushed back. Also, in the two shots during this scene, her water glass is half full and her hands are hidden under the table; the camera then cuts directly to a waist-up shot in which her hands are clearly visible and her glass has only an inch of water in it.
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After calling the White House asking for Howard Hunt, Woodward calls the Mullen Company where he was told by Charles Colson's secretary he also worked. The insert of him dialing the phone shows the number ending in 1414 which is the number he previously called to get the White House.
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When Bernstein is talking on the phone to the librarian at the Library of Congress, he is typing. When the librarian comes back on the line after a pause and contradicts her earlier statements, Bernstein reaches for some paper and starts writing notes, but when he goes over to see Woodward after the phone call, he takes the paper out of the typewriter and gives it to Woodward, saying they are his notes.
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Crew or equipment visible 

Bob Woodward goes outside the offices of The Washington Post to make a more private phone call from a phone booth. Just as he's entering the booth, you can see the face of one of the crew members reflected off the metal strip of the booth frame.
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Errors in geography 

At one point, Woodward is shown driving east in front of the White House, but then ending up immediately afterwards at the John F. Kennedy Center, which is west of the White House.
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Factual errors 

In a 2007 web discussion on Watergate, reporter Bob Woodward gave the following answer when asked for the biggest factual error in this movie: "The movie is an incredibly accurate portrait of what happened. To limit the number of characters, the city editor, Barry Sussman, was merged into another character. That is regrettable, and something Carl Bernstein and I should have fought, because Sussman played a critical role in guiding and directing our reporting."
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In the movie the reporter (played by Peggy Fuller) who tells Bernstein that former Post employee and subsequent White House functionary Ken Clawson claimed he wrote the infamous "Canuck Letter" is called Sally Aiken. The real-life reporter's name was Marilyn Berger.
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When he phones the Library of Congress, there is a close-up of Woodward dialing "1414". The phone number of the Library of Congress in 1972 was 426-5000. Presumably this shot was meant to show him phoning the White House at 456-1414.
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In the first note to Woodward from Deep Throat, he says to meet at 2 AM in the garage. Woodward takes a cab and gets out in front of the John F. Kennedy Center to switch taxis. At that time, there is a crowd of people leaving the Kennedy Center, as if leaving a performance. No performance at the Kennedy Center would have gone that late.
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The name of the lawyer encountered by Woodward at the arraignment of the Watergate burglars gives his name as "Markham". In reality, the lawyer identified himself to Woodward as Douglas Caddy.
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Miscellaneous 

In a one of the tight shots of the teletype slowly revealing a line in one of the early Washington Post's articles, the word "criticize" is misspelled, using the British spelling: "Federal Audit report, expected to criticise the filing of some campaign funds of President ....". Perhaps it was shot in the UK?
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Revealing mistakes 

As Woodward is ending a call from a phone booth, a car in the street behind it clearly slows down and two people look out presumably to watch the scene being filmed.
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After Bernstein and Woodward talk to Dean about why he revoked his statement, you can see people walking into the hallway, startling when they see the camera and then walk past the wall as if they could keep out of the shot.
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See also

Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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