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All the President's Men (1976)

"The Washington Post" reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein uncover the details of the Watergate scandal that leads to President Richard Nixon's resignation.

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(book), (book) | 1 more credit »
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2,846 ( 66)

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Won 4 Oscars. Another 13 wins & 21 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Bookkeeper
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Penny Fuller ...
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Foreign Editor
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Frank Wills
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Arresting Officer #1
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Storyline

In the run-up to the 1972 elections, Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward covers what seems to be a minor break-in at the Democratic Party National headquarters. He is surprised to find top lawyers already on the defense case, and the discovery of names and addresses of Republican fund organizers on the accused further arouses his suspicions. The editor of the Post is prepared to run with the story and assigns Woodward and Carl Bernstein to it. They find the trail leading higher and higher in the Republican Party, and eventually into the White House itself. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The most devastating detective story of the century! See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

9 April 1976 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Todos los hombres del presidente  »

Box Office

Budget:

$8,500,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Star Jason Robards received all of his Academy Award nominations for playing real-life people: Benjamin C. Bradlee in All the President's Men (1976), Dashiell Hammett in Julia (1977), and Howard Hughes in Melvin and Howard (1980). Robards won for the first two films but not the third. Each of these three Oscar nominations was in the Best Actor in a Supporting Role category. See more »

Goofs

When Bernstein is interviewing Judy Hobeck she says that in a 2 day period, 6 million dollars came in. When Woodward and Bernstein were going over the notes of the interview, Bernstein says that in a 6 day period, 6 million dollars came in. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[first lines including archive footage]
Walter Cronkite: Now here comes the president's helicopter, Marine Helicopter Number One, landing on the plaza on the east side of the east front of the Capitol.
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Crazy Credits

The opening Warner Bros. Zooming \\' logo is in black and white. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Trading Places (1983) See more »

Soundtracks

Concerto in C for two trumpets
(RV 537)
Written by Antonio Vivaldi
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Exciting Investigative Journalism
28 May 2003 | by (Whistler, BC, Canada) – See all my reviews

Rating: 9 out of 10. Directed by Alan Pakula. Robert Redford does a great job playing the role of journalist Bob Woodward. The more talented Dustin Hoffman gives an excellent performance as Carl Bernstein. I once heard that this movie is a good guide for 'how-to' and 'how-not-to' conduct investigative journalism.

The two journalists team up right after the Watergate burglars get arrested. They follow their own clues, but these tips only lead to dead ends, the puzzle is complicated. However, these Watergate burglars seem to be linked to the Republican Party and possibly to the White House.

Alan Pakula does an incredible job of keeping the movie suspenseful and intriguing. As the story progresses, the viewer feels deeply involved in how these two journalists uncover the conspiracy. The contrast between the two main characters adds to the movie. Redford as Woodward has a relaxed and charming approach, while Hoffman as Bernstein is more persistent and sometimes daring.

Woodward has a White House contact played by Hal Holbrook named 'Deep Throat' that he meets in 'Cloak and Dagger' style in a dark undercover parking lot, we never see his face clearly and he speaks in a rough rasping voice. 'Deep Throat' provides Woodward information in an indirect manner and keeps the journalists on the right track. This type of informant character has been replicated many times over in suspense movies and TV, especially on the TV series 'The X-Files'.

Jason Robarbs as Bill Bradlee, editor of 'The Washington Post' performs remarkably as boss of the newspaper. Constantly reminding Woodward and Bernstein to find good solid evidence, but he also gets frustrated when none of the informants will go on the record with what they know. Robarbs won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for this role.

I never get bored with watching this movie. If you have not seen it before, treat yourself to a viewing.


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