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Novecento
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1900 (1976) More at IMDbPro »Novecento (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   15,212 votes »
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Down 11% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
Franco Arcalli (written by) and
Giuseppe Bertolucci (written by) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for 1900 on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
4 November 1977 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Set in Italy, the film follows the lives and interactions of two boys/men, one born a bastard of peasant stock (Depardieu)... See more » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
3 wins & 3 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
As satisfying as the best classic novels; shame about that touch of political revisionism See more (92 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Robert De Niro ... Alfredo Berlinghieri

Gérard Depardieu ... Olmo Dalcò (as Gerard Depardieu)

Dominique Sanda ... Ada Fiastri Paulhan
Francesca Bertini ... Sister Desolata
Laura Betti ... Regina
Werner Bruhns ... Ottavio Berlinghieri
Stefania Casini ... Neve - Epileptic Woman

Sterling Hayden ... Leo Dalcò
Anna Henkel-Grönemeyer ... Anita the Younger (as Anna Henkel)
Ellen Schwiers ... Amelia

Alida Valli ... Signora Pioppi
Romolo Valli ... Giovanni Berlinghieri
Bianca Magliacca ... Peasant Woman
Giacomo Rizzo ... Rigoletto
Pippo Campanini ... Don Tarcisio
Paolo Pavesi ... Alfredo as a Child
Roberto Maccanti ... Olmo as a Child
Antonio Piovanelli ... Turo Dalcò

Paulo Branco ... Orso Dalcò (as Paolo Branco)
Liù Bosisio ... Nella Dalcò (as Liú Bosisio)
Maria Monti ... Rosina Dalcò
Anna Maria Gherardi ... Eleonora
Demesio Lusardi ... Montanaro - Big Eared Peasant
Pietro Longari Ponzoni ... Pioppi
Angelo Pellegrino ... Tailor
José Quaglio ... Aranzini
Clara Colosimo ... Woman who accuses Olmo
Mario Meniconi
Carlotta Barilli ... Peasant
Odoardo Dall'aglio ... Oreste Dalcò
Piero Vida
Vittorio Fanfoni ... Fanfoni - a fascist
Alessandro Bosio ... Fascist
Sergio Serafini ... Young Fascist
Patrizia De Clara ... Stella
Edda Ferronao ... Stella's Daughter
Winni Riva ... Parisian Peasant
Fabio Garriba ... Peasant at Attila's execution
Nazzareno Natale ... Peasant at Attila's execution
Katerina Kosak ... Parisian Peasant

Stefania Sandrelli ... Anita Foschi

Donald Sutherland ... Attila Mellanchini

Burt Lancaster ... Alfredo Berlinghieri the Elder
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Francesco D'Adda ... Soldier on Train (uncredited)
Allen Midgette ... Vagabond (uncredited)
Salvator Mureddu ... Chief of the King's Guards (uncredited)
Mimmo Poli ... Fascist (uncredited)
Tiziana Senatore ... Regina as a Child (uncredited)
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Directed by
Bernardo Bertolucci 
 
Writing credits
Franco Arcalli (written by) and
Giuseppe Bertolucci (written by) and
Bernardo Bertolucci (written by)

Produced by
Alberto Grimaldi .... producer
 
Original Music by
Ennio Morricone 
 
Cinematography by
Vittorio Storaro 
 
Film Editing by
Franco Arcalli 
 
Production Design by
Maria Paola Maino 
Gianni Quaranta 
 
Art Direction by
Ezio Frigerio 
 
Set Decoration by
Maria Paola Maino 
 
Costume Design by
Gitt Magrini 
 
Makeup Department
Paolo Borselli .... hair stylist
Iole Cecchini .... hair stylist (as Jole Cecchini)
Giannetto De Rossi .... key makeup artist
Fabrizio Sforza .... makeup artist
Maurizio Trani .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Giuseppe Banchelli .... production supervisor
Paolo De Andreis .... production manager
Augusto Marabelli .... production supervisor
Alessandro Mattei .... production supervisor
Silvano Spoletini .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Massimo Arcalli .... assistant director
Suzanne Durrenberger .... second assistant director
Clare Peploe .... second assistant director
Gabriele Polverosi .... assistant director
Peter Shepherd .... assistant director
Giovanni Soldati .... second assistant director
Claudio Taddei .... third assistant director
Giuseppe Bertolucci .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Carlo Agate .... construction chief
Mauro Pagano .... assistant production designer
Gianni Silvestri .... set dresser
 
Sound Department
Fausto Ancillai .... sound mixer
Roberto Arcangeli .... foley artist
Michael Billingsley .... sound editor (as Mike Billingsley)
Claudio Maielli .... sound
Giuliano Maielli .... sound recordist
Alessandro Peticca .... sound editor (as Sandro Peticca)
Decio Trani .... boom operator
 
Visual Effects by
Andrea Baracca .... digital color timing: restored version HD to 35mm (uncredited)
Ludovico Bettarello .... digital online film restoration: Technicolor Rome (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Giuseppe Alberti .... assistant camera
Luciano Galli .... chief electrician
Alfredo Marchetti .... key grip
Mauro Marchetti .... assistant camera
Angelo Novi .... still photographer
Enzo Tosi .... camera operator
Enrico Umetelli .... camera operator
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Vittoria Guaita .... assistant costume designer
 
Editorial Department
Gabriella Cristiani .... assistant editor
Ugo De Rossi .... assistant editor
Fernanda Indoni .... second assistant editor
Ernesto Novelli .... color technician
Rosemarie Ruddies .... assistant editor
Elvio Sordoni .... assistant editor
Chris Balton .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Angelo Giovagnoli .... musician: french horn
Nando Monica .... musician: accordion
Ennio Morricone .... conductor
Rota .... musician: ocarina (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Ferruccio Amendola .... voice dubbing: Robert De Niro
Claudio Camaso .... voice dubbing: Gérard Depardieu (as Claudio Volonté)
Riccardo Caneva .... administrative director
Riccardo Cucciolla .... dubbing director
Leonardo Curreri .... administrator
Mario Di Biase .... general manager
Rossella Ferrero .... production secretary (as Rosella Ferrero)
Maurizio Forti .... administrator
Clemente Giovannini .... press office
Alberto Grimaldi .... presenter
Antonio Guidi .... voice dubbing: Donald Sutherland
Renato Mori .... voice dubbing: Sterling Hayden
Nico Naldini .... press office
Enzo Ocone .... continuity
Antonio Pala .... administrator
Giuseppe Rinaldi .... voice dubbing: Burt Lancaster
Angelo Sarago .... administrator
Rita Savagnone .... voice dubbing: Dominique Sanda
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Novecento" - Italy (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
USA:245 min (heavily cut) (R-rated version) | 317 min (2 parts) | Argentina:250 min (heavily cut) | Australia:248 min (heavily cut)
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:X (original rating) | Argentina:18 (re-rating) | Australia:R | Canada:R | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Finland:K-15 (DVD) | Finland:K-16 (1988) | Finland:K-18 (1976) | France:-16 (uncut) | Germany:18 (uncut version) | Hungary:18 | Italy:VM14 (part 1) | Italy:VM14 (part 2) | New Zealand:R18 | Norway:18 | Norway:18 (DVD release) (2005) | Portugal:M/16 (uncut) | Singapore:R21 (cut) | South Korea:18 | Spain:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:18 | USA:R (original rating) | USA:Unrated (uncut version) | USA:NC-17 (uncut version) (rating surrendered) | West Germany:16 (f) (original rating) | West Germany:16 (video rating) (cut)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Bernardo Bertolucci stated that in an interview, he filmed the scenes of the movie based on the four seasons. If you notice, the meeting of the boys is summer, the adult reunion of Alfredo and Olmo takes place in a fall moment. The Fascist takeover is winter, while the end of World War Two is spring.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: In the movie, Olmo is depicted as coming back from World War One, while Alfredo, even though conscripted, manages to stay at home thanks to his father's connections. In reality, people born in 1901 (like Olmo and Alfredo) were never conscripted to fight in the war, as they were only 17 when it ended in November 1918. The last ones to be conscripted in Italy where those born in 1899.See more »
Quotes:
Alfredo Berlinghieri:[Had just accused Olmo of hiding his wife] I'm sorry, I don't know what's the matter with me. I don't know, I'm not feeling well, I think I have a heart condition.
[Grabs his hand]
Alfredo Berlinghieri:Feel my heart.
Olmo Dalco:[Knocks him away] What heart? You're just sick in the head!
Alfredo Berlinghieri:Maybe you're right. I don't know, I'm going crazy. Ada's gone and I can't find her.
Olmo Dalco:And you come looking for her in my bed?
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in 1900: Creating an Epic (2006) (V)See more »

FAQ

Why are there two titles for this film, "1900" & "Novecento"?
Why did Attila become a fascist?
Why didn't Alfredo put a halt to Attila's actions?
See more »
76 out of 99 people found the following review useful.
As satisfying as the best classic novels; shame about that touch of political revisionism, 29 January 2006
Author: Asa_Nisi_Masa2 from Rome, Italy

All in all, I loved Bertolucci's 1900. By the end of it (I watched the uncut, 318 minute version and it was an effortless, engrossing, never over-long experience), I found myself feeling as satisfied as someone who's just finished reading one of those wonderful, very long classic novels. There are, however, some major flaws, not just in narrative structure but also in content, and this is why I've given it "just" a 9/10. It's rather disjointed and all over the place, like a huge, gangly foal rather than a harmoniously-formed horse.

However, I don't agree with one accusation I heard that was leveled at it, regarding its change of tone. In my view it was unavoidable and appropriate when dealing with a historic period going from the beginning of the 20th century to the rise to power of Mussolini (1922), and finally to the culmination of full-blown Fascist oppression. The "change of tone" in the film perfectly captured the profound and shocking changes that swept over Italy, as if bitten by something that had made it go mad.

My main problem with the film, however, was of content rather than structure: the over-simplification of its politics, not to mention the inaccuracy in the way it portrays the reasons for the rise of Fascism. These smack of just a little too much historical revisionism even for a tendentially left-wing person like me. But then, 1900 was made in the 70s, smack bang in the middle of a decade in which the Italian left wing had a strong hold on the country's artistic and cultural institutions. After decades of poverty, ignorance and forced silence, these institutions voiced their views with a more earnest tone than they would have had if they'd never been repressed. Pasolini, Bertolucci, Moravia and several others producing art during the 50s-70s in Italy are a prime example of this kind of voice. Inevitably, it was tinged with a political agenda – it couldn't have been otherwise, as political freedom was a new toy and everyone was so keen to play with it.

Bertolucci's film would have us believe that the rich landowners (represented here by the Berlinghieri – Robert De Niro's character's family) were responsible alone for sponsoring the Fascists. Keen to maintain the country in an archaic state of feudalism with the poor, ignorant multitudes working their estates as semi-slaves, they encouraged or turned a blind eye to the violent cruelty of the blackshirts. They employed them as "guard dogs" (as De Niro's character Alfredo refers to Attila, Donald Sutherland's Fascist bully character at one point), giving them official charges as managers of their estates and oppressors of any sign of rebellion, etc. Though this has effectively happened, a more objective historic version will take into account that for Fascism to spread so rapidly and so well, it must have had some hold on the "common people", too. Just consider that the rich landowners were a tiny, tiny minority of the population and not all were sympathetic to Mussolini – originally a Socialist himself. The rich often supported the monarchy and/or church instead (and Mussolini aspired to a lay state, not a religious one). It was indeed so many of the common men and women of Italy who responded well to the young Mussolini, who was neither particularly cultured nor a member of the elite, yet was a charismatic go-getter who could speak to the crowds in a way that made sense to them for the first time ever. The landowners and aristocrats, decadent and totally out of touch from reality (as Bertolucci's film shows so well), had no idea how to relate to the masses. In contrast, Mussolini wanted to harness the energy of the multitudes, giving them a sense of worth for the first time ever. What a cruel irony this turned out to be for all those people!

What Bertolucci's film is successful at putting across is the fact that neutrality, turning a blind eye to and staying passive to Fascism was in itself responsible for allowing it to thrive. ****SPOILERS****: Alfredo does nothing to stop Attila and his stooges beat Olmo, Gèrard Depardieu's character, to a bloody mess, despite the fact he knew that Olmo was innocent of having killed the child at the wedding party. This scene is so effective in creating a sense of frustration in the viewer. Watching that scene, it comes naturally to ask oneself: "Why didn't anyone do anything to stop it?" EXACTLY! ****END OF SPOILERS.****

Regarding the accusation leveled at the uncut version of the film containing pornographic sequences: I thought pornography's sole purpose was to titillate and arouse. Do any scenes in this movie try to achieve this? Most certainly not! Naked human bodies can be representative of so much more than just sex. They are not just about the degree of their ability to arouse or otherwise, but also about a whole other spectrum of human states and feelings. Strength, vulnerability, tenderness, compassion, closeness, distance, receptiveness and whatever else is sometimes just not possible to express in so many lines of dialogue. Why shouldn't a sexual encounter – even one featuring genitals in view – speak volumes about so many other aspects of men and women's humanity?

I could write so much more about this movie! Though not as mesmerisingly beautiful to look at as Bertolucci's 1970 film Il Conformista, it is none the less a testament to Vittorio Storaro's genius photography once again. I will probably be watching this movie many more times and discovering more layers, more beauty and even more imperfections… which is all worthwhile when confronted with such amazing material. Whoever's been comparing 1900's portrayal of Fascism with the way it was dealt with in Il Conformista isn't being entirely fair: the latter takes a far more intellectual approach (after all, Fascism was a multi-faceted phenomenon) and is a less ambitious film anyway, therefore less likely to fail.

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