"Quincy M.E."
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

11 items from 2014


Legendary TV Producer Glen A. Larson Dead At 77

16 November 2014 8:57 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

The iconic television writer, creator, and producer Glen A. Larson passed away Friday, November 14, at the age of 77.

Larson was perhaps best known for creating some of the most iconic TV shows of the 1970s and '80s including Alias Smith and Jones, McCloud, Buck Rogers In The 25th Century, B.J. And The Bear, Trauma Center, Quincy M.E., Manimal, The Fall Guy, and Magnum P.I..

However, two of Larson's most lasting creations are still cultural touchstones to this day. In 1982, Larson introduced Kitt, the artificially intelligent car, and David Hasselhoff's Michael Knight to American audiences with Knight Rider, and it quickly became one of the biggest TV hits of its day.

Photos: Stars We've Lost In Recent Years

Four years prior, Larson created a show that would, much later, become a hugely celebrated franchise. In 1978, Larson brought the cult classic sci-fi series Battlestar Galactica to TVs across the country.

While not a huge »

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Battlestar Galactica Creator Glen A. Larson Dies

16 November 2014 8:18 AM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

The television writer and producer Glen A. Larson, whose oeuvre includes hit television shows from Battlestar Galactica, Quincy M.E., Magnum, P.I., Knight Rider, and a number of others died Friday night in Los Angeles, California. He had been battling esophageal cancer. He was 77.Larson's first writing credit was for The Fugitive, and he later worked his way up the ladder, creating his first show, Alias Smith and Jones in 1971. He later made Battlestar Galactica, which lasted for just a season in 1978-79, because of high production costs. The show is best known now for its beloved rebirth in the mid aughts on Syfy. His biggest hits would come in the '80s with the mustachioed Tom Selleck in Magnum P.I. and Knight Rider starring David Hasselhoff. He earned three Emmy nominations for McCloud and Quincy, M.E. When Larson was younger, he was part of a vocal quartet called »

- E. Alex Jung

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'Battlestar Galactica' Creator Glen A. Larson Passes Away at 77

15 November 2014 1:38 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

One of the leading voices in 70s and 80s television has passed away. Glen A. Larson died Friday night at the age of 77 at a California hospital. He succumbed to esophageal cancer.

Glen A. Larson is known as one of television's seminal storytellers. He is responsible for creating over a dozen hit TV series. The highlights in his career include Battlestar Galactica, Knight Rider, Magnum P.I., Manimal, Quincy M.E., Buck Rogers in the 25th Century and Cover Up.

Glen A. Larson got his start in show business during the 1950s, serving as a member of The Four Preps musical group. A decade later, he began his writing career, which started with an episode of The Fugitive.

He won a trio of Emmys starting in 1974 and 1975 for McCloud, which took home trophies for Outstanding Limited Series. And then he won again in 1977 for Quincy M.E., which took home the award for Outstanding Drama Series. »

- MovieWeb

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'Magnum P.I.' Creator Dead -- Glen A. Larson Dies From Cancer at 77

15 November 2014 12:25 PM, PST | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

Glen A. Larson -- who created the hit shows "Magnum P.I.", "Knight Rider" and "Quincy M.E." -- has died from esophageal cancer at the age of 77.The incredibly successful writer died Friday night at UCLA Medical Center ... according to his son James.Larson was one of the most prolific producers of the '70s and '80s ... creating a string of iconic hit shows -- including "Battlestar Galactica," "The Fall Guy," "B.J. and the Bear, »

- TMZ Staff

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Battlestar Galactica, Magnum P.I. Creator Glen A. Larson Dies at 77

15 November 2014 12:10 PM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Children of the ’70s and ’80s have lost one of their seminal storytellers.

Emmy nominee Glen A. Larson, who created dozens of hit series including Battlestar Galactica, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, Quincy M.E., Cover Up, Magnum, P.I., Manimal, The Fall Guy and Knight Rider, died Friday night at age 77 at a California hospital. The cause of death was esophageal cancer.

Larson, who began his show-biz career in the 1950s as a member of The Four Preps singing group, transitioned to TV writing a decade later with an episode of The Fugitive.

His trio of Emmy nominations came »

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Bill Cosby stops speaking when NPR asked about rape allegations

15 November 2014 11:49 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Bill Cosby stops speaking when NPR asked about rape allegations When “Weekend Edition’s” Scott Simon brought up the allegations in an interview taped last week but aired this morning, he was met with silence. "This question gives me no pleasure, Mr. Cosby, but there have been serious allegations raised about you in recent days,” Simon asked. To which, according to Simon, Cosby responded by shaking his head no. Glen A. Larson dies -- creator of “Knight Rider,” “Battlestar Galactica,” “Magnum P.I." Larson, 77, also created “The Fall Guy” and “Quincy M.E.” Larson died Friday night of esophageal cancer at UCLA Medical Center. A script for a very important “American Horror Story: Freak Show” scene was stolen According to TMZ, the one-page script has been shopped around to various media outlets. “The Wire’s” David Simon loved this “Comeback” clip “so hard” Watch Valerie Cherish react to seeing a poster for »

- Norman Weiss

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‘Battlestar Galactica’ Creator Glen A. Larson Dies at 77

15 November 2014 10:43 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Legendary TV creator Glen A. Larson, the writer-producer behind “Battlestar Galactica,” “Magnum, P.I.,” “Knight Rider” and “Quincy M.E.” died on Friday, the Los Angeles Times reports. He was 77.

His son James told the Lat that Larson passed away of complications from esophageal cancer Friday night at UCLA Medical Center.

Larson had a string of TV hits in the 1970s and 80s, and dozens of writing and producing credits to his name. He created his first show, “Alias Smith and Jones,” in 1971, but left the ABC Western right after star Peter Duel committed suicide.

Larson also co-conceived “Quincy M.E.” with Lou Shaw. The NBC forensic drama starring Jack Klugman had an impressive eight-season run from 1976-83.

He created “Battlestar Galactica” a few years later. Although the series only lasted a single season (ABC cut the cord in 1979 after two dozen episodes partly because of its hefty production cost), it spawned a series of spinoffs. »

- Maane Khatchatourian

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Glen A. Larson, Creator of TV’s 'Quincy M.E.,' 'Magnum, P.I.' and 'Battlestar Galactica,' Dies at 77

13 November 2014 2:49 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Glen A. Larson, the wildly successful television writer-producer whose enviable track record includes Quincy M.E., Magnum, P.I., Battlestar Galactica, Knight Rider and The Fall Guy, has died. He was 77. Larson, a singer in the 1950s clean-cut pop group The Four Preps who went on to compose many of the theme songs for his TV shows, died Friday night of esophageal cancer at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, his son, James, told The Hollywood Reporter. Larson also wrote and produced for such noteworthy series as ABC’s It Takes a Thief, starring his fellow Hollywood High

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- Mike Barnes

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Forever episode 2 review: Look Before You Leap

25 September 2014 1:30 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Forever settles into a generic groove by its second episode. Here's Billy's review of Look Before You Leap...

This review contains spoilers.

1.2 Look Before You Leap

It was hard not to be mildly disappointed with the first regular season episode of Forever, because Look Before You Leap seemed very mechanical for the most part. The charm evident in the pilot all but vaporised, and we were presented with a by-the-numbers case that wouldn’t have seemed out of place in an eighties cop show.

What we really wanted to see was the relationship between Detective Jo Martinez and Dr Henry Morgan to develop, but it just didn't. Jo simply sees Henry as a fast track to detecting results and drags him around like her favourite accessory. It didn’t help that they introduced a new superior for Jo in the form of Lt. Joanne Reece (Lorraine Toussaint), who was the »

- louisamellor

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Ed Nelson, ‘Peyton Place’ Star, Character Actor, Dies at 85

12 August 2014 4:41 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Ed Nelson, a star of the 1960s primetime soap “Peyton Place” and an actor with almost 200 credits, mostly in television, died on Saturday in Greensboro, N.C. He was 85.

Nelson had most recently appeared in the 2003 courtroom thriller “Runaway Jury,” starring Gene Hackman. He had a more significant role as General Sherman in the 1998 Jackie Chan vehicle “Who Am I.”

On “Peyton Place,” he played Dr. Michael Rossi during the entire five-year run of the series — 436 episodes. He returned in 1985 for reunion telepic “Peyton Place: The Next Generation.”

But Nelson was already a TV veteran by the time he was cast on “Peyton Place” in 1964. After a string of small parts in Roger Corman B movies during the mid to late ’50s, he began guesting on Westerns such as “Zane Grey Theater,” “Have Gun — Will Travel,” “The Rifleman,” “Maverick,” “Rawhide” and “Gunsmoke” plus other series such as “Twilight Zone,” “The Untouchables, »

- Carmel Dagan

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R.I.P. Character Actor Larry D. Mann

7 January 2014 9:23 PM, PST | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

The man whose 100-plus film and TV credits include voicing Yukon Cornelius in the holiday TV classic Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer and playing the train conductor in Best Picture Oscar winner The Sting died Monday in Los Angeles. Larry D. Mann was 91. The Toronto native got his start on Canadian TV and went on to appear on classic shows ranging from Howdy Doody to MacGyver. In between, his dozens of TV appearances included 77 Sunset Strip, The Big Valley, Ben Casey, My Favorite Martian, Get Smart, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., Hogan’s Heroes, Bewitched, Green Acres, Gunsmoke, Quincy M.E., The Dukes Of Hazzard and recurring as a judge on Hill Street Blues. His big-screen credits include The Quick And The Dead, Robin And The 7 Hoods, The Singing Nun, In The Heat Of The Night and The Octogon. »

- THE DEADLINE TEAM

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

11 items from 2014


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