8.0/10
335
16 user 8 critic

Captains and the Kings 

Rags-to-riches tale of an Irish immigrant in late 1800s.
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Episodes

Seasons


Years



1  
1976  
Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 3 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Series cast summary:
...
 Joseph Armagh 8 episodes, 1976
...
 Harry Zieff 8 episodes, 1976
...
...
 Elizabeth Healey Hennessey / ... 6 episodes, 1976
...
 Charles Desmond 6 episodes, 1976
...
 Rory Armagh 4 episodes, 1976
...
 Mary Armagh / ... 4 episodes, 1976
...
 Marjorie Chisholm Armagh 4 episodes, 1976
...
 Gentleman 4 episodes, 1976
...
 Claudia / ... 4 episodes, 1976
...
 Ed Healey 4 episodes, 1976
...
 Sean Armagh 3 episodes, 1976
...
 Courtney Wickersham 3 episodes, 1976
...
 Tom Hennessey 3 episodes, 1976
...
 Martinique 3 episodes, 1976
...
 Katherine Hennessey 3 episodes, 1976
Doug Heyes Jr. ...
 Kevin Armagh 3 episodes, 1976
...
 Honora Houlihan / ... 3 episodes, 1976
...
 Miss Emmy 3 episodes, 1976
...
 Clair Montrose 2 episodes, 1976
...
 Sen. Enfield Bassett 2 episodes, 1976
...
 Judge Newell Chisholm 2 episodes, 1976
...
 Sister Angela 2 episodes, 1976
Joe Kapp ...
 Bill Strickland / ... 2 episodes, 1976
...
 Anne-Marie 2 episodes, 1976
Rod Haase ...
 Roger Mace 2 episodes, 1976
Charles H. Gray ...
 Captain Calvin 2 episodes, 1976
Charles O. Lynch ...
 Hotel Clerk 2 episodes, 1976
Roberta Storm ...
 Mrs. Calvin 2 episodes, 1976
Edit

Storyline

Joseph Armagh was a poor Irish immigrant who came to the United States in the mid-19th century, and proceeded, through struggle, heartache and hard work, to become one of the richest and most powerful men in the country. This nine-part miniseries details Armagh's path to success. Written by Marty McKee <mmckee@soltec.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

30 September 1976 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Capitanes y los reyes  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (9 episodes)

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Producer Jo Swerling Jr. remembers "We had a lovely young actress named Beverly D'Angelo doing a love scene with Harvey Jason. It was your typical TV shot across her back to Harvey as she lets the negligee drop to the ground, and she's standing there naked. Then we did closeups of Harvey, and then of Beverly. And in Beverly's closeup we put a TV matte on the lens so that our matted field of vision would cut just at the nipple line; that was it was obvious that she was nude, but you didn't see any nipple. However, when the show was telecast, there were in the new TV sets variances in the field of vision, and half the sets in the country saw more of Beverly than the other half. The following morning, we got a panic call from Broadcast Standards that we had violated the nudity ban and that more people saw Beverly's nipples than didn't. But nobody complained. Nobody but the censors. The upshot was that we were told not to cut it that close in the future." See more »

Connections

References Citizen Kane (1941) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
One of the best "family saga" miniseries.
10 April 2006 | by See all my reviews

I really can't say enough about it here, because I've been hugely attached to it since it came out. There are several reasons to watch it - along with the "historical romance" reasons, there are the political ideas (which are that much bigger in the novel, but a very big part of this TV version). Whether it's borderline "conspiracy" thinking (with "those men" who influence everything) or not, those ideas have influenced plenty of my political thinking. (Partly because of this story, I always think the phrase "opportune little war" when I hear about ANY given war- and quite some time BEFORE the past three years.) Richard Jordan was just great as Joseph, an Irish character who hardly fits any of the images of Irishmen (even the positive ones), who's almost completely "cool", and whose emotions don't come out (in a big way) except in certain dramatic scenes, like the scenes with Catherine or Tom (for opposite reasons). There isn't enough room to mention all the best actors and characters, or scenes, but there's Perry King as Rory Armagh, Patty Duke Astin as Bernadette (I think someone here mentioned how great she was as a tragic character, and she won an Emmy for it, very deservedly), Jane Seymour as Margery, Cliff DeYoung as Brian Armagh, the aviator-film-maker etc., with his star Pearl Gray (Pearl White), Vic Morrow, who was extremely good as Tom Hennesey (and whom you really feel sorry for in that last scene with him, in spite of everything he's done), Beverly D'Angelo as Miss Emmy, Charles Durning as Big Ed Healy (I don't know if he's ever played a more entertaining character), and Harvey Jason as Harry Zeff. As far as I know, he's mainly a supporting actor in comedies, and you see that in his "sidekick" kind of relationship with Joseph, but of course with other levels to it - the scene where Joseph accuses Harry of being disloyal to him, which is the one kind of talk Harry can't stand to hear from him, and the scene where Joseph turns his back on blackmailing the senator, and Harry is glad for all three of them (not knowing what's coming next). And of course, the big guest stars, like John Houseman as Mr. Chisholm and Henry Fonda as Senator Bassett (two of the best scenes). Again, I could go on and on, but it's simply a very underrated story, as far as I know (in spite of the Emmy). Though to me, underrated is putting it pretty mildly.


7 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 16 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

'La La Land' Producer on the Art of Espionage

Jordan Horowitz shares some "secret" information about his new spy-thriller series, "Counterpart." Plus, Kevin Smith reveals his favorite Sundance movies of all time.

Watch now