Edit
The Wilby Conspiracy (1975) Poster

Trivia

The movie, set in South Africa, often refers to "Kaffirs". A "Kaffir", according to Wikipedia, "...was used in the former South Africa to refer to a black person. Now an offensive ethnic slur, it was previously a neutral term for black southern Africans. The word is derived from the Arabic term Kafir, which means 'disbeliever' or literally, 'one who conceals (the truth)' . . . In South Africa today, the term is regarded as highly racially offensive, in the same way as "nigger" is in other countries. It is seldom used as an isolated insult, but rather is used systematically, by openly racist individuals, when talking about black people, and as such was very common in the Apartheid era. Use of the word has been actionable in South African courts since at least 1976 under the offense of crimen injuria: "the unlawful, intentional, and serious violation of the dignity of another"." The use of the word was a significant plot point, in Lethal Weapon 2 (1989).
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Most of the movie is set in South Africa, in Johannesburg and Cape Town, but due to the political sensitivity of anti-apartheid, no attempt was made to film there.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
First non-Dutch film of actor Rutger Hauer.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Sidney Poitier and Michael Caine were almost seriously injured during principal photography of a chase scene, when a fifty pound camera flew in between them, into the front seat of a Jeep, that Poitier was driving fast. Michael Caine later commented: "It went like a massive bullet, and if it had hit either of us, our head would have been crushed to pulp. Sidney and I took several days to get over the shock of our near deaths, and this incident brought us both down to Earth, with rather more than a bump."
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Movie poster artwork for this picture positioned Sidney Poitier and Michael Caine to appear as if they were hand-cuffed together, similar to Poitier and Tony Curtis in The Defiant Ones (1958).
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This movie was made and released three years after its source novel was first published in 1972. This picture is the only filmed adaptation of a story by Peter Driscoll.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Michael Caine once said of this film, that it was his "first foray into that very risky realm of 'message' pictures."
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Sidney Poitier and director Ralph Nelson reunited on this film, for their third and final film together, after previously collaborating on Duel at Diablo (1966) and Lilies of the Field (1963).
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Kenyan President Jomo Kenyatta personally invited Sidney Poitier to shoot the film in Kenya.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Ralph Nelson once said that this movie is "A film about man's humanity to man, which, in the course of entertaining, may also make people think".
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The nickname of the African National Congress was the "Black Congress".
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
First English language film of Indian actress Persis Khambatta.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Kenya portrays South Africa, as it was too politically unstable to shoot the picture there.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Rutger Hauer and Persis Khambatta starred in Nighthawks (1981).
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The word "schvartzer", heard in the film, is reportedly a Yiddish word for a black man or woman, and is considered derogatory.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
BOSS is the inaccurate and incorrectly used acronym for the South African Bureau of State Security.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Shot in Kenya, Sidney Poitier had previously filmed there for Something of Value (1957) with Rock Hudson.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Archie Duncan's final film. He died in 1979.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The distance of the trek that was traveled by Shack and Keogh, from Cape Town to Johannesberg, was 900 miles (1,448 kilometers).
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Persis Khambatta played a character with the same first name as her own.
0 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film's closing credits declare: "This motion picture is fictional and any resemblance to actual persons or events in South Africa is purely coincidental".
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page