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The Return of the Exorcist (1975)

Un urlo dalle tenebre (original title)
A priest becomes involved in demonology and exorcisms.

Directors:

(as Frank G. Carroll), (as Frank C. Lucas)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Exorcist
Françoise Prévost ...
Barbara, Piero's mother
...
Elena Forti
Jean-Claude Vernè ...
Piero Forti
Sonia Viviani ...
Sherry, Piero's girlfriend
Elena Svevo
Mimma Biscardi ...
Succubus (as Mimma Monticelli)
Franco Garofalo ...
Leader at the Sabbath
Giuseppe Talarico
Filippo Perego ...
Priest
Giangiacomo Elia
Giulio Baraghini
Rita Orlando
Bruno Di Levrano
Franco Lo Cascio
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Storyline

This movie starts with the teenager Peter (Jean-Claude Verne) who takes a picture of a mysterious naked woman (Mimma Monticelli) near a pastoral waterfall. When the picture is developed, the woman's image is gone, and Peter is possessed by her ghost through a cursed amulet he finds at the scene. Written by Ørnås

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Genres:

Horror

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Release Date:

23 August 1975 (Italy)  »

Also Known As:

The Possessor  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Trivia

Final film of Richard Conte. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Video Nasties: Moral Panic, Censorship & Videotape (2010) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Bewildering
16 August 2015 | by See all my reviews

HBL (and their Pepto Bismol pink logo, which reminded me of 555) released this under the title, The Exorcist III Cries and Shadows, despite the fact that when this film came out in 1975, there had not yet even been an Exorcist II, and with The Exorcist displayed in one font, the Roman numeral III in a different font, and Cries and Shadows in yet another font, with Directed by Elo Pannaccio' directly underneath the title, followed by the cast, "Screenplay by Aldo Crudo, Franco Brocani, Elo Pannaccio' Story by Guido Albonico" - it really took four people to write this Exorcist clone? "First ass~ director: Demetrio Soare" (I presume they meant *assistant*) The final item listed in the opening credits was Elo Pannaccio' s director credit, a second time.

Once the bewildering credits over rain-soaked Rome end, and the incredibly lengthy altar sacrifice/ orgy scene finally end - eight long minutes into the film - the plot is nearly a carbon copy of Wm. Peter Blatty's Exorcist, but with a male lead, as Davy Jones lookalike is possessed by a demon in the form of an attractive nude girl, glimpsed briefly and photographed near a waterfall. When the photos are developed, the girl is not at all visible in them, but Davy Jones begins all the usual behavioral problems Linda Blair did, and after a very long and slowly paced hour, an exorcist, in the form of Richard Conte, turns up to attempt to drive the demon away. Blah, blah blah, blah blah.

This occasionally has the mood and atmospherics of some of Jean Rollin's work, with its intentionally slow pacing, lush colours, abundant female nudity, and surrealist images, but it doesn't help that we are watching a near scene-for- scene ripoff, with nearly X-rated sex and nudity added to an otherwise PG-rated horror, which was released in Greece as Exorkistis No. 2 (Exorcist II) , in the UK, Japan, and Finland as The Exorcist III.

The only credit shown at the end is Directed by Elo Pannaccio', for the third time. He was so proud of this thing that he wanted his director credit listed three times?


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