The Sunshine Boys (1975) - News Poster

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Exclusive: How ‘Taxi’ Informed Danny DeVito’s Tony-Nominated Broadway Debut

Exclusive: How ‘Taxi’ Informed Danny DeVito’s Tony-Nominated Broadway Debut
It may seem odd that an actor as firmly associated with New Yawk as Danny DeVito would wait till his early 70s to make his Broadway debut, in this year’s revival of Arthur Miller’s The Price. Mind you, DeVito -- who’s actually a Jersey boy, born in Neptune Township and raised in Asbury Park -- initially prepared for a stage career, graduating from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and performing at major regionals and off-Broadway before landing the TV role, as dispatcher Louie De Palma on Taxi, that made him a star.

“I’d come close to doing Broadway a couple of times a while ago, but it didn’t work out,” says DeVito. “As an actor, you go where the work is” -- and DeVito’s had no shortage, between his seemingly endless film credits (as a producer and director as well) and his numerous television projects, among them the
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

The Top 25 Funniest Actors of All Time

  • Cinelinx
Who are the funniest, wackiest, cleverest, wittiest comic actors in the history of film and television? Take a look at our list and see who we came up with.

The top 25 laugh-getters…

#25…George Carlin: Probably the best stand-up comedian of all-time. He brilliantly satirized American culture, mixing his liberal social commentary with an often unapologetically coarse and dirty style of language. His penchant for obscenities was most evident in his trademark routine “Seven words you can never say on television”. No one was better at mocking the excesses of American culture than Carlin.

#24…Robin Williams: He had a manic energy and great improvisational skills. His hyper, free-form style inspired many comedians to follow, such as Jim Carrey. He shot to fame in the TV series Mork & Mindy, before breaking away to very successful movie career, appearing in films like Good Morning Vietnam, The World According to Garp, Mrs. Doubtfire and Popeye.
See full article at Cinelinx »

The 25 greatest Oscar speeches

  • Hitfix
The 25 greatest Oscar speeches
We're just a week away from another gold-tinged year of speeches, upsets, and snubs. After all the hype, what ends up mattering about the Oscars? I'd argue it's the speeches, and that's why we're picking the 25 best acceptance speeches ever -- by actors only. Sorry, but glamor is a key element in any Oscar moment and I don't have time to remember if the guy who adapted The Last Emperor thanked his mom.  25. Dustin Hoffman, Kramer vs. Kramer Dustin Hoffman's seriousness initially seems worrisome, but his mix of sarcasm and sincerity is right for the ceremony.  24. Marion Cotillard, La Vie en Rose Cotillard's tearful speech makes you realize how rare it is than an Oscar recipient is surprised to win. As Cotillard scrambles to make sense of the honor, she comes up with an ebullient finale: "Thank you, life! Thank you, love! It is -- there are some angels in this city.
See full article at Hitfix »

Richard Benjamin To Attend "The Sunshine Boys" 40th Anniversary Screening In L.A., August 4

  • CinemaRetro
Herbert Ross’s 1975 film The Sunshine Boys, which stars Walter Matthau, George Burns, and Richard Benjamin, celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles will be holding a special one-night-only showing of the 111-minute film on Tuesday, August 4th, 2015 at 7:00 pm. Actor Richard Benjamin is scheduled to appear at the screening and is due to partake in a Q & A and discussion on the making of the film.

From the press release:

Fortieth anniversary screening of The Sunshine Boys (1975), Tuesday, August 4 at 7 Pm at the Royal.

Walter Matthau, George Burns, and Richard Benjamin star in the film version of Neil Simon's hit Broadway comedy about a pair of feuding vaudeville stars who are pressured to reunite for a TV special. The film was nominated for four Academy Awards, and Burns won the Oscar for his first significant film role since Honolulu in 1939. The
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Remembering the First and Only Arab World Movie Star Known Around the Globe

Omar Sharif in 'Doctor Zhivago.' Egyptian star Omar Sharif, 'The Karate Kid' producer Jerry Weintraub: Brief career recaps A little late in the game – and following the longish Theodore Bikel article posted yesterday – below are brief career recaps of a couple of film veterans who died in July 2015: actor Omar Sharif and producer Jerry Weintraub. A follow-up post will offer an overview of the career of peplum (sword-and-sandal movie) actor Jacques Sernas, whose passing earlier this month has been all but ignored by the myopic English-language media. Omar Sharif: Film career beginnings in North Africa The death of Egyptian film actor Omar Sharif at age 83 following a heart attack on July 10 would have been ignored by the English-language media (especially in the U.S.) as well had Sharif remained a star within the Arabic-speaking world. After all, an "international" star is only worth remembering
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Warner Bros.’ Archive Collection Covering All Bases With Everything From Wolfen to Noir-Classic Satan Met A Lady

Warner Bros.’ Archive Collection has been doing quite the job giving genre and non-genre fans an extensive amount of DVD and Bluray releases of classic horror, crime noir and comedy films, some of which are available for the first time. Sure there are Quite a lot of new genre films to keep us busy for ages, but it does feel good to sit back and watch classic films that not only inspired today’s film-making, but paved the way for a lot of recent films.

We thought it would be nice to write a bit about some of our favorite releases from WB’s Archive Collection, thanks to the gang over there for sending a few titles my way to check out. Read on!

Wolfen (1981)

The story of a series of murders being investigated by a detective and his new partner (Albert Finney and the absolutely gorgeous Diane Venora), Wolfen suffered,
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Richard Benjamin Reflects On "The Sunshine Boys": A Cinema Retro Interview

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

On June 16, the Warner Archive will release the 1975 screen version of Neil Simon's comedy classic "The Sunshine Boys" as a Blu-ray special edition. The film stars Walter Matthau and George Burns as Lewis and Clark, a legendary vaudeville comedy team who have not been on speaking terms since they broke up their act eleven years ago. For their work in the film, Matthau was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar, George Burns won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar and Richard Benjamin, who co-stars as Matthau's harried nephew and agent who tries the Herculean task of reuniting the team for a television special about comedy greats, won a Golden Globe award. Cinema Retro had the opportunity to speak with Richard Benjamin about his memories of working on the film.  

Cinema Retro: "The Sunshine Boys" must have had a very personal meaning to you, given the fact that your uncle,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Costume Designer Patricia Norris Dies at 83

Costume Designer Patricia Norris Dies at 83
Patricia Norris, the Oscar-nommed and Emmy-winning production designer and costume designer who helped craft distinctive looks for “12 Years a Slave,” “Scarface” and numerous other films, as well as TV’s “Twin Peaks,” died of natural causes on Feb. 20 in Van Nuys, Calif. She was 83.

Working with noted directors including David Lynch, Terrence Malick, Robert Altman, Wim Wenders and Brian De Palma, she was Oscar-nommed six times, for “12 Years a Slave,” “Sunset,” “Victor, Victoria,” “The Elephant Man” and “Days of Heaven.”

Though she didn’t win the Oscar for “12 Years,” she did win the Costume Designers’ Period Film Award. Norris, who was known as Patty, was the only person to receive Lifetime Achievement Awards from both the Costume Designers Guild and the Art Directors Guild.

“At a time when women were new at the creative table, Patricia made a place for herself,” said Marcia Hinds, chair of the Art Directors Council at the Adg.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Costume Designer Patricia Norris Dies at 83

Costume Designer Patricia Norris Dies at 83
Patricia Norris, the Oscar-nommed and Emmy-winning production designer and costume designer who helped craft distinctive looks for “12 Years a Slave,” “Scarface” and numerous other films, as well as TV’s “Twin Peaks,” died of natural causes in Van Nuys, Calif., on Feb. 20. She was 83.

Working with noted directors including David Lynch, Terrence Malick, Robert Altman, Wim Wenders and Brian De Palma, she was Oscar-nommed six times, for “12 Years a Slave,” “Sunset,” “Victor, Victoria,” “The Elephant Man” and “Days of Heaven.”

Though she didn’t win the Oscar for “12 Years,” she did win the Costume Designers’ Period Film Award. Norris, who was known as Patty, was the only person to receive Lifetime Achievement Awards from both the Costume Designers Guild and the Art Directors Guild.

She had a longtime collaboration with Lynch. She designed the costumes for Lynch’s “The Elephant Man,” “The Straight Story,” “Lost Highway,” “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 10 Most Badass Oscar Speeches Ever

  • Hitfix
The 10 Most Badass Oscar Speeches Ever
I am ready for Oscar speeches. I am ready for badass Oscar speeches. And here are 10 that remind you what it looks like when a bad-ass wields a gold statue and tells it like it is.  1. Lee Grant remembers what Hollywood did to her. And now they will never forget. Lee Grant, who won a Best Supporting Actress for "Shampoo," was blacklisted in the '50s and had to put her entire career on hold. She eventually rebounded with an Emmy for "Peyton Place" and a couple of Oscar nominations. When the time came to approach the dais, she had reckoning on her mind. Addressing her Oscar, she said, "We had a fight 20 years ago. I think he's changed. I know I haven't." Bam. 2. George Burns was the hottest young star of '75. George Burns picked up an Oscar for "The Sunshine Boys" at the age of 80. And yet, he
See full article at Hitfix »

Casting Society of America to Honor Rob Marshall, Ellen Lewis

Casting Society of America to Honor Rob Marshall, Ellen Lewis
Rob Marshall and Ellen Lewis will be honored at this year’s Artios Awards, the Casting Society of America has announced.

Marshall, who received award recognition for his direction of films “Chicago,” “Memoirs of a Geisha” and “Nine,” as well as his 1998 Broadway revival of “Cabaret,” will receive the New York Apple Award. It honors New Yorkers who have made significant contributions with casting directors.

Lewis will receive the Hoyt Bowers award, which recognizes unique spirit, ideals and creativity in casting. Lewis has casted movies such as “Goodfellas,” “Forrest Gump” and “The Wolf of Wall Street,” and is known for her work with Martin Scorsese.

“Marshall and Lewis have defined excellence in their respective fields, and each has played a vital role in the advancement of the casting industry,” said Richard Hicks, president of the Casting Society of America. “Throughout their careers, the honorees and nominees have been instrumental in
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Casting Society of America to Honor Rob Marshall, Ellen Lewis

Casting Society of America to Honor Rob Marshall, Ellen Lewis
Rob Marshall and Ellen Lewis will be honored at this year’s Artios Awards, the Casting Society of America has announced.

Marshall, who received award recognition for his direction of films “Chicago,” “Memoirs of a Geisha” and “Nine,” as well as his 1998 Broadway revival of “Cabaret,” will receive the New York Apple Award. It honors New Yorkers who have made significant contributions with casting directors.

Lewis will receive the Hoyt Bowers award, which recognizes unique spirit, ideals and creativity in casting. Lewis has casted movies such as “Goodfellas,” “Forrest Gump” and “The Wolf of Wall Street,” and is known for her work with Martin Scorsese.

“Marshall and Lewis have defined excellence in their respective fields, and each has played a vital role in the advancement of the casting industry,” said Richard Hicks, president of the Casting Society of America. “Throughout their careers, the honorees and nominees have been instrumental in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Casting Society to honor 'Into the Woods' director Rob Marshall at Artios Awards

  • Hitfix
Casting Society to honor 'Into the Woods' director Rob Marshall at Artios Awards
While the Oscars have yet to make room for casting directors — a pivotal part of the Best Picture equation — the oversight isn't stopping the Casting Society of America from readying its third decade of picking up the Academy's slack. Csa announced Monday morning that the 30th Annual Artios Awards will honor Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning director Rob Marshall and Emmy Award-winning casting director Ellen Lewis for their individual work in the world of casting. The news arrives with nominations in categories of television, theater, new media and short film, and on the heels of the ceremony's move from November to Jan. 22, the thick of the awards season. Feature film nominations will be announced closer to the show date. Marshall, whose adaptation of Stephen Sondheim's "Into the Woods" bows Dec. 25, will receive the New York Apple Award, "recognizing individuals who have made special contributions to the New York entertainment
See full article at Hitfix »

“Hey, Glad You Won But…”: Top 10 Nominees Deprived of Oscar Gold in Favor of Another Contender

  • SoundOnSight
The knock on the Academy Awards throughout the years always seem to be how certain actors, directors and films are snubbed in favor of other chosen nominations. Sometimes the justification for these overlooked selections in performances and motion pictures are warranted. Many will agree that a lot of injustices have been committed based on how some Oscar-worthy selections were slighted.

Has anyone ever considered the equal possibilities of omission when one Oscar nominee wins the golden statuette over another nominee that one thought was more deserving for the victory? There have been numerous instances when observers who have witnessed an Oscar win thought that their competitor should have received it instead. It is only human nature to have an opinion as to feel who should have claimed Oscar gold as opposed to the fellow nominee that actually accomplished the goal.

Let us look at the top ten instances where it
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Big Screen to Small Screen: Top 10 Films About Television

  • SoundOnSight
There has always been an understated rivalry between the mediums of movies and television. Many years ago it was even thought as being somewhat of a drastic career letdown if actors/actresses from film decided to depart for the landscape of television. The truth is that for some performers that had stalled or uneventful momentum in motion pictures that the concept of “slumming it” in television actually saved their show business profession. Hence, the boob tube made them relevant whereas the big screen had unceremoniously passed them by.

However, there is also a mutual respect that cinema and television share that go hand in hand when shaping our appreciation for entertainment on both the big and small screen. When movies depict the aspects of the TV world giving a sociological, psychological or emotional perspective then it is not so uncool to be a proud couch potato after all, right? Let
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Comedians and their parents: Nina Conti and father Tom

'It sounds like it was a risible, weird topic to you': Nina and Tom Conti get to grips with her choice of career

Tom Conti says he and Nina's mother Kara had a favourite expression in the early days. When there was a lull in the conversation, one of them would ask the other, "Do you know anything about ventriloquism?" Both were actors, and neither of them did.

"How bizarre," Nina says. "It sounds like it was a risible, weird topic to you."

"Yes," Tom continues happily in a rich, rolling Scottish accent, "it was an absurdity."

Nina is weighing up her father's words. This conversation could go either way. She smiles. "It was an absurdity to me, too. I only did it to please Ken Campbell, because he wanted me to try it and he was quite scary. You had to do what he said – you always did his bidding.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Best of the Week Ahead: Oct. 10-16

"Shepard & Dark" on screens in L.A. and NYC; comedy duo Tj & Dave play NYC's Town Hall; Tony Danza discusses his career at the Drama League Theatr Center; the Glass-Wilson opera "Einstein on the Beach" finally premieres in L.A.; and Judd Hirsch and Danny Devito reviving Neil Simon's "The Sunshine Boys" at the Ahmanson are what we're looking forward to this week. Click Here To View Slideshow
See full article at Backstage »

The Sunshine Boys: Theater Review

The Sunshine Boys: Theater Review
If someone chose to burlesque the institutional theater of Los Angeles with a view to mocking its parochialism (and who could conceivably want to do that?), they’d might concoct a revival of The Sunshine Boys, starring, say, the reunited team of Danny DeVito and Judd Hirsch, “together again for the first time” since the hit series Taxi. But it turns out the laugh’s on us, since this sly-footed reprise of the 1972 Neil Simon comedy about a retired vaudeville comedy team still thrashing out old grudges and resentments is anything but toothless, providing some genuine bite and letting deft

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Adam Ferrara On "Nurse Jackie": Exclusive Interview

  • CinemaRetro
Adam Ferrara with Edie Falco in Nurse Jackie. (Photo: Ken Regan/Showtime)

By Eddy Friedfeld

Actor/comedian Adam Ferrara used to fight fires with Denis Leary on Rescue Me. He now drives way too fast on Top Gear. This season he is trading witty banter and love scenes with Edie Falco. As New York City Police Sergeant Frank Verelli, his scenes with Falco are as funny and even hotter than those with the crew of the fictional “62 Truck.”

Nurse Jackie, the superb Showtime comedy drama about hospitals, addiction, friendship, and family, with the former Carmella Soprano, the brilliant Edie Falco, leading a magnificent cast and guest stars including Merritt Wever, Paul Schulze, Dominic Fumusa, Anna Deavere Smith and Peter Facinelli, Bobby Cannavale, Morris Chestnut, Stephen Wallem, Betty Gilpin, and Ferrara.

As the fifth season wraps up this Sunday night, the show is still smart, tight, and interesting and has just
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Milo O'Shea obituary

Irish stage and screen character actor who appeared in Barbarella, The Verdict and the BBC's 1969 sitcom Me Mammy

For a performer of such fame and versatility, the distinguished Irish character actor Milo O'Shea, who has died aged 86, is not associated with any role in particular, or indeed any clutch of them. He was chiefly associated with his own expressive dark eyes, bushy eyebrows, outstanding mimetic talents and distinctive Dublin brogue.

His impish presence irradiated countless fine movies – including Joseph Strick's Ulysses (1967), Roger Vadim's Barbarella (1968) and Sidney Lumet's The Verdict (1982) – and many top-drawer American television series, from Cheers, The Golden Girls and Frasier, right through to The West Wing (2003-04), in which he played the chief justice Roy Ashland.

He had settled in New York in 1976 with his second wife, Kitty Sullivan, in order to be equidistant from his own main bases of operation, Hollywood and London. The
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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